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The Sound of Success

Posted By Michael Leonetti, CSAP, Wednesday, July 10, 2019

In a past issue of Strategic Alliance Monthly, we asked Bruce Cozadd, cofounder and chief executive of Jazz  Pharmaceuticals, Could Music Be the Secret Sauce of Compelling Collaborative Leaders?

 

“This concept of individual excellence, but it’s all about how you play as a group, really resonates to me as a management philosophy,” explained Cozadd, not merely a scientist, but also a classically trained musician who routinely plays all requests on the company piano while surrounded by  singing employees. “It’s a playful, energetic theme that fits perfectly with alliance management,” chimed Ann Kilrain, Jazz’s head of alliance management. “We recognize that while individuals are able to accomplish much as individuals,

we create something much greater together.”

 

The musician-CEO and his CAO continue their remarkable riff on the topic of collaborative leadership, discussing how leaders model their  organization’s values and specifically about how alliance leaders can impact the culture of an organization—change it, grow it, and help it prosper. Talk about resonance. In my observation, the best partnering companies have leaders who display the qualities Bruce Cozadd projects. And the best alliance executives model transparent leadership with partners and bring that same style to their internal leadership and alliance team culture.

 

Cozadd reminds me of my former CEO and the straightforward model I developed when I was his alliance leader.

I call it The Four Cs of Alliance Leadership:

  • Communication
  • Culture
  • Collaboration
  • Compromise

Communication. And I mean all the time. Overcommunication is the name of the game. But remember, as the late Stephen Covey taught, “Seek first to understand.” Every day you need to ask yourself, in your internal leadership role, are you seeking to understand in the way you would with your partner? Then, given that understanding, are you providing the constant, effective communication required to be understood?

 

Culture. My CEO used to tell me, “Don’t lose your soul.” He wasn’t discussing matters of faith, rather, of culture. He defined culture as what made our company great. Culture eats everything—breakfast, lunch, and dinner. But it has to be good culture—most of us have struggled uphill to partner when we work in the opposite kind of corporate culture. In a good culture, everyone is respected, not just the boss; everyone, including the boss, is accountable, expected to be open, honest, trustworthy.

 

Collaboration. That’s what we do with partners—but are you demonstrating and practicing a partner mindset within your own organization? Again, not easy. You may be criticized, you may be challenged, you may be asked who do you work for—us or them? But when you break through—when collaborative leadership begins to become part of your culture, supported by your CEO— you’re going to be wildly successful with your partners.

 

Compromise. True leaders model, every day, the ability to compromise without abdicating. Never compromise your goal. Instead, seek greatness, but understand the solution you define together will be the solution that will make you successful. You have to define it together, with your colleague or your partner, which means you have to compromise.

 

Notice that “Command” doesn’t appear in my Four C’s of Alliance Leadership. Any enduring leader knows how to command, but great partnering organizations, and great companies, get great results because people truly invest, not because they’re told what to do. Partners work the same way, as Cozadd recognizes.

 

“When we start discussions with a potential partner,” he explains in this issue, “my comment to our team is, ‘If we’re successful, we’re going to end up working with those people on the other side of the table. Let’s start treating them from the first time we meet them with respect, transparency, honesty. No hide-the-ball, no misrepresentation of our interests. They should come out with a high degree of trust in everyone. It has to be the whole team.’”

 

Call it conducting the collaborative symphony—or, simply, the sound of success. 

Tags:  Alliance Leadership  Bruce Cozadd  Collaboration  Communication  Compromise  Culture  Jazz Pharmaceuticals  Music  Resonance  Strategic Alliances  The Four Cs 

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