My Profile   |   Print Page   |   Contact Us   |   Sign In   |   Register
ASAP Blog
Blog Home All Blogs
Welcome to ASAP Blog, the best place to stay current regarding upcoming events, member companies, the latest trends, and leaders in the industry. Blogs are posted at least once a week; members may subscribe to receive notifications when new blogs are posted by clicking the "Subscribe" link above.

 

Search all posts for:   

 

Top tags: alliance management  alliances  collaboration  partnering  alliance  alliance managers  partners  partner  alliance manager  ecosystem  partnerships  The Rhythm of Business  partnership  Jan Twombly  biopharma  governance  Eli Lilly and Company  Strategic Alliance Magazine  Vantage Partners  IBM  IoT  ASAP BioPharma Conference  strategy  healthcare  NetApp  2015 ASAP Global Alliance Summit  Cisco  cloud  communication  digital transformation 

On the Eve of Disruption: Summit Keynote Will Explore How Digital Transformation Affects Nearly Every Industry

Posted By Michael J. Burke, 16 hours ago

“Disruption,” in addition to being a much-used term in the business press, is a two-edged sword: an exciting prospect if you’re the one doing the disrupting; not so much if your company or industry finds itself being disrupted and forced to scramble and adapt. Some disruptions may be temporary—as, we fervently hope, will be those spawned by COVID-19—while others are likely here to stay.

It’s these more lasting and far-reaching effects that will be the subject of a keynote address at the ASAP Global Alliance Summit, now scheduled for late June, to be given by Steve Steinhilber, global vice president of ecosystems and business development at Equinix. The presentation, titled “Creating Alliances and Digital Ecosystem Capabilities in an Increasingly Platform Enabled and Interconnected World,” will examine how the speed and scale of information technology growth and new global platforms will enable—and even necessitate—the digital transformation of nearly all businesses, creating many new business models in the process.

According to Steinhilber, the speed and rate of disruption varies by industry, but many existing value chains are already under significant disruptive threat. Industries that are “content sensitive or highly inefficient value chains” have already experienced this disruption, he said, as whole segments of the value chain have been eliminated. These industries include advertising, newspapers, movies, and retail, as well as the travel industry, including hotel bookings and other reservations services.

Others are either just starting out on this journey or find themselves somewhere in the middle. Steinhilber cited the automotive and transportation services industries as examples of verticals that are just beginning to experience the waves of change, while “all layers of the IT industry and also the satellite launch industry” are in the midst of ongoing disruption.

According to an IDC survey, by 2022—less than two years away—at least 60 percent of global GDP will be digitized, with growth in every industry driven by digitally enhanced offerings, operations, and relationships. And according to McKinsey, digital ecosystems will account for more than $60 trillion in revenue by 2025, or more than 30 percent of global corporate revenue. As we’ve seen—and if you haven’t already, check out our cover story on ecosystems in the Q1 2020 issue of Strategic Alliance Quarterly for more on this trend—these disruptive forces are enabled by an explosion of information technology delivered via platform-enabled companies monetized by new business models. These platform models are proving to be much more profitable than product pipeline business models, and also offer accelerated time to market for new products and services and create new ways to share the wealth. This has directly translated into massive growth in platform companies’ market capitalizations.

These new ecosystem- and platform-based models have significant implications for how partnering frameworks and practices are changing, said Steinhilber, requiring “a blend of both strategic, high-touch partner management as well as low-touch engagement via new tools and systems.” And as organizations as a whole struggle to adjust and adapt, today’s—and tomorrow’s—alliance and partnering professionals will need to change their ways, too.

“They’ll still need conventional strategic alliance skills in order to manage complex, highly strategic relationships,” Steinhilber said. “But they’ll also need to have the ability to build programmatic models to engage companies that are wanting to innovate on top of the platform. This means implementing new financial models such as revenue sharing, deploying tools to automate partner engagement and management, developing dashboards that can manage rapid scaling, and being able to ensure the quality of what partners are offering on your platform.”

Curious to learn more? Me too! Stay tuned for more information on this and other outstanding presentations to be offered at the upcoming ASAP Global Alliance Summit. 

Tags:  alliance  digital ecosystems  Digital Transformation  disruptive  ecosystem  engagement  Equinix  frameworks  IDC  IT industry  McKinsey  partner  partnering professionals  platform-based models  satellite launch industry  Steve Steinhilber  strategic relationships  value chains 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Strategic Alliance Quarterly Q2 Outtakes: How Alliance Managers Keep Data Alliances from Running Afoul of IP, Privacy Laws

Posted By Jon Lavietes, Saturday, April 4, 2020

We’re deep in the throes of assembling our Q2 2020 edition of Strategic Alliance Quarterly, which means we’ve gathered insights from a number of ASAP members and friends of the community. As is always the case, not every useful tidbit of information we’ve gleaned will make it into the issue. That is where this blog comes in. It gives us a forum to share some tips that may one day come in handy for an alliance professional, and hints at what will hit your mailbox in the coming weeks.

This quarter’s Strategic Alliance Quarterly examines the tenets of IP and privacy law that alliance managers must know when putting together and running a data-driven alliance. The piece is a follow-on to our feature on early AI alliances that appeared in the previous issue. It covers some basics of specific statutes like the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA), and chronicles some broad measures around negotiating initial contracts, handling data at all parts of the alliance life cycle, and driving amendments to the agreement when necessary.

 A Template for Expediting Contract Negotiations

In the article, Rita Heimes, general counsel and privacy officer for the International Association of Privacy Professionals (IAPP), shared some valuable knowledge around how to determine whether the data at the heart of a partnership is classified as personally identifiable information (PII), and thus subject to GDPR and maybe CCPA regulations. She also outlined how to collect that data and transfer it to partners, when to dispose of it, and ways to limit liability where this new privacy legislation is vague.  

Heimes also had another pointer for alliance managers, who by and large don’t carry law degrees, that you won’t read in the full print story.

“It’s always a good idea to work with qualified counsel in the first instances [of working with data-driven alliances] to create a really robust template, assuming the alliance manager’s employer is in position to start the contract negotiations,” said Heimes. 

In Heimes’s estimation, creating and reusing a template will help alliance professionals learn the basic language of GDPR and CCPA and the entry-level issues they need to address on behalf of their organizations. Moreover, it gives them something concrete to fine-tune with legal if and when a potential partner has redlined a contract proposal or radically changed the initial terms. 

Creeping Toward a Potential Legal Breach

Brian O’Shaughnessy, partner at Dinsmore & Shohl LLP and a former ASAP BioPharma Conference co-presenter, talked about what he called “mission creep” in an alliance that spans several years. In the print version, he expanded on how alliance managers need to convene stakeholders regularly to check whether the alliance’s original purpose is still relevant and whether the current contract still reflects its mission. He spoke about the alliance manager’s critical responsibility for driving contract amendments should a collaboration take a slightly different course from the one charted at the outset of the voyage.

What didn’t make it into print are some of the potential consequences if an alliance manager fails to catch this mission creep in time. The research team “might not be generating the data the other side [intended], or you’re not producing the products that they need,” O’Shaughnessy said by way of example. Or worse, employees executing alliance responsibilities could be using the partner’s IP in a way that’s not contemplated in the agreement—for example, using a diagnostic device to diagnose a condition it wasn’t intended for, a potentially costly contract infringement.  

“You don’t want to be the one that has invested millions of dollars and thousands of FTEs (full-time employee) to generate a bunch of information and data only to find out that because you were using that data wrong, or you weren’t complying with certain contractual obligations, now the other side can terminate the agreement, with the result that perhaps you don’t get the benefit you had sought,” said O’Shaughnessy.

Many ASAP members are involved in data-centric alliances around AI-powered drug discovery initiatives, IoT products or services, and new ways to diagnose patients’ illnesses more quickly and accurately, among many other use cases. Don’t miss the ASAP editorial team’s overview of the basics in keeping your data-centered alliance out of legal hot water stemming from IP misuse or privacy violations. Be on the lookout for the Q2 Strategic Alliance Quarterly in May.

In the meantime, if you haven’t already, check out your copy of the Q1 Strategic Alliance Quarterly and absorb the emerging best practices in joint marketing, collaborative selling, and research and development as they relate to AI alliances. 

Tags:  AI alliances  AI-powered  alliance managers  Contract Negotiations  data alliances  data-centered  data-centric  Dinsmore & Shohl LLP  drug discovery  General Data Protection Regulation  IP and privacy law  O’Shaughnessy  Rita Heimes  Strategic Alliance Quarterly 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

A Message to Our ASAP Member Community

Posted By Michael Leonetti, CSAP, Saturday, April 4, 2020

The global health crisis involving COVID-19 has forced all of us to change how and where we’re working, how we’re living, where we’re going (or not going), and so much more. Our hearts go out to all those whose health has been affected by this crisis, or who have loved ones they care about who are vulnerable. And we gratefully acknowledge and thank all the brave healthcare workers and others who are on the front lines of this disease, bravely exposing themselves to it as they try to save lives. Many ASAP members, too, are part of organizations that are working to produce vaccines, treatments, and vital medical equipment that can help in the fight against COVID-19.

Meanwhile, we’re very aware that across the globe, the way business is getting done looks very different right now. Like many organizations large and small, the ASAP team is working remotely and adjusting to this new reality. However, we’re still here for you! We’re working hard to put together great content for our member community and to bring it directly to you virtually. Here are just a few of the things we’re working on:

  • We’re continuing to develop quality alliance management virtual learning opportunities to go out to you as part of our series of ASAP Netcast Webinars.
  • We’re bringing you regular updates and digests of partnering news via our Strategic Alliance Weekly and Monthly emails.
  • Our ASAP blog and ASAP newsfeed remain ongoing vehicles to provide you with partnering and alliance news and insights, outtakes from our magazine articles, and more.
  • Speaking of our magazine, Strategic Alliance Quarterly is alive and well! The Q2 issue is in the works and planning has already begun for Q3 and beyond.
  • Although a number of ASAP chapter events have had to be postponed, we’re working with our chapter leaders and members to get them rescheduled—so stay tuned!
  • Planning has already begun for the popular ASAP BioPharma Conference to be held in September—with the call for presentations now open through May 1.
  • Last but not least, we’re working toward providing a high-quality, content-rich ASAP Global Alliance Summit in late June.

Like you, we’re continuing to do our jobs as best we can under these extraordinary circumstances, and we’re working every day to provide content that matters to our wonderful ASAP community. If there is anything we can do to help you and your teams during this time, please do not hesitate to reach out to our ASAP staff.

And above all, thank you! Thank you for being a member of our ASAP community. Our collective strength lies within all those engaged in the alliance and partnering world of which you are a vital part. Together, we’ll get through this!

Tags:  alliance management  ASAP BioPharma Conference  ASAP blog  ASAP Global Alliance Summit  ASAP Netcast Webinars  ASAP newsfeed  COVID-19  member community  Partnering  produce vaccines  Strategic Alliance Quarterly  Strategic Alliance Weekly  treatments  virtual learning  virtually  vital medical equipment 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

AI Is Simple—Until It’s Not

Posted By Jon Lavietes, Thursday, March 26, 2020

ASAP members, the Q1 2020 edition of Strategic Alliance Quarterly is now in your hands, and we hope you enjoy our feature that examines some of the early tenets emerging around still-nascent artificial intelligence (AI) alliances that now dot all walks of business. Per usual, this blog serves as a vehicle to share some of the thoughtful commentary that didn’t make it into the print feature. The following insights come to you via Bruce Anderson, electronics industry global managing director at IBM. 

We touched briefly in the piece on how vertical-industry expertise is a must for creating some of the more advanced AI applications in the market today. This isn’t true of all AI-enabled products and services—Anderson cited smart speakers, which evolve their communication based on the data they collect throughout their interactions with end users, as an example of an application that doesn’t require much more than the optimization of a set of programming APIs to bring to market.

Those Who Have External Data Use It—Those Who Don’t, Buy It

However, to develop a program for optimizing manufacturing schedules, development teams need more than just base APIs. Anderson noted that an AI algorithm of this nature would in all likelihood need to digest various sets of internal end-user data, plus some external data sources, such as weather (to account for factors like humidity and temperature). In this case, the coding skill and IT knowledge of software developers can only take you so far. They need to collaborate with manufacturing veterans to figure out how to integrate domain expertise that is specific to that manufacturing environment. In many cases, companies may conclude that there isn’t “a [single] package with all of the data I might want. There’s engineering, and perhaps data acquisition, that has to be done,” according to Anderson.

Alliance managers charged with bringing AI innovations to market must get creative and figure out which companies might possess the data sets needed to create a new AI application. Then they must use their deal-making skills to put together win-win agreements that incentivize those data proprietors to share their data sets. (We discuss this new “offering manager” role in depth in the quarterly feature.)

Anderson also spoke about the difference between early back-end technology AI alliances and partnerships designed to bring an AI solution to market—more specifically, how the former is often much simpler than the latter. Bringing together servers, development platforms, sensors, traditional enterprise applications, and data management services that will ultimately power your AI APIs could be just as simple as integrating technology pieces.

“One of the companies involved may not know what you’re using [its product] for. You just know you’re using a lot of it,” said Anderson.

Happy Selling? Easier Said Than Done

But once an ecosystem of partners starts to jointly comarket and/or cosell a product offering, another layer of complexity is added.

“The more people that you get involved, there’s a lot of people who want a slice of the pie—in other words, the revenue—so you start to get complex marketing and selling arrangements,” said Anderson. “You could have a single offering that is jointly developed with somebody else. It could be sold by either of the parties. It could be delivered by either of the parties. There could be a third company in there, as well, if they’re involved in the overall stack.”

The challenge can be summed up in one question: “How do you keep it so that all of the alliance partners are happy?” asked Anderson.

Again, in the quarterly feature we delve into some of the specific issues partners need to sort out in these situations in order to bring orderly, concise, and impactful sales presentations to prospective buyers. Check-out the print issue you received earlier this month! 

Tags:  AI  API  Artificial Intelligence  Bruce Anderson  comarket  cosell  data management services  external data  IBM  innovations  integration  Strategic Alliance Quarterly 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Making Adjustments: ASAP Global Alliance Summit Now in June!

Posted By Michael Leonetti, CSAP, Monday, March 9, 2020

We’ve all had the experience of an unexpected event that suddenly threw a wrench into our alliances or our lives. Depending on the nature of the event, its magnitude, and how close to home it hits, we generally do our best to understand how the landscape has changed, adjust to the implications, make accommodations, and move forward. Reality may defy our hopes and expectations, but we pick up the pieces, dust ourselves off, and keep getting up in the morning amid the now-altered environment.

So it is with the coronavirus, or COVID-19, whose effects worldwide have already proven serious. Our hearts go out to all those who have been directly affected by this virus, especially the families of those who have died from it around the globe. In addition, this contagious disease—and the fear of it—has already had a significant economic impact, including declines in business and vacation travel and the cancellation or postponement of a number of conventions, conferences, and trade shows in various industries. Most organizations have been forced to respond in some way, whether to shift events to alternative dates or from physical to virtual, to curtail travel to safeguard their people, or to try to limit the damage to their bottom line. Or all of the above.

We at ASAP have faced these challenges as well, resulting in the difficult decision to reschedule our Global Alliance Summit, which had been scheduled for next week, to June 23–25 in Tampa, Florida. In the great scheme of things this move may barely register, but for a member organization like ours, as you can imagine, it’s a big deal. Shifting the Summit to new dates has required a huge and immediate lift on the part of ASAP staff and board, which is ongoing as I write this.

The good news is, the show will go on! I’m very happy that we were able to secure the original conference venue, the Renaissance Tampa International Plaza Hotel, for our late-June dates. I’m even more pleased to report that at present, nearly 75 percent of our presenters, panelists, and moderators have confirmed that they’ll be there.

What this means is that we’ll still have a terrific program, as planned—a program that, as always, includes presentations by some of the alliance and partnering profession’s best and brightest minds and leading lights, including these:

  • A keynote presentation by Steve Steinhilber, global vice president, ecosystems and business development, at Equinix: “Creating Alliances and Digital Ecosystem Capabilities in an Increasingly Platform Enabled and Interconnected World.” Steve ran alliances at Cisco for a number of years, and while there authored the influential book Strategic Alliances: Three Ways to Make Them Work (2008). He was also among those interviewed for our Q1 2020 cover story in Strategic Alliance Quarterly on the rise and far-reaching effects of ecosystems in nearly every industry, and his insights into this important and growing area are sure to be valuable and applicable to any industry.
  • A fascinating panel moderated by Adam Kornetsky of Vantage Partners titled “Big Pharma M&A and Alliance Portfolios: What’s at the End of the Rainbow?” This interactive discussion will feature panelists including Mark Coflin, CSAP, vice president and head of global alliances at Takeda Pharmaceuticals; Dana Hughes, vice president of integration management and alliance management at Pfizer; and Jeffrey C. Hurley, senior director, GBD global alliance lead at Takeda. These longtime ASAP members will share their recent M&A experiences, provide insights into how alliance portfolios have been managed through the transaction process, and engage participants in sharing additional perspectives critical for unlocking and maximizing the full value of an alliance portfolio.
  • A presentation by Dan Rippey, director of engineering for Microsoft’s One Commercial Partner program, and Amit Sinha, chief customer officer and cofounder of WorkSpan, called “How the Microsoft Partner-to-Partner Program Is Disrupting the Way Technology Companies Are Leveraging the Power of Ecosystems for Business Growth, Customer Acquisition, and Gaining a Competitive Advantage.” With the rise of ecosystems has come the increasing deployment of partner-to-partner (P2P) programs, and Microsoft’s may be the largest on the planet, connecting partners directly with each other to deliver value to customers without Microsoft’s intervention. Powered by WorkSpan Ecosystem Cloud, this program increases profitability by selling solutions from one or more of Microsoft’s partners, achieving faster time-to-market by leveraging prebuilt joint solutions, closing larger deals, and reaching more customers by co-selling with other Microsoft partners for a bigger joint pipeline. This new model of partnering has wide applicability and Dan and Amit’s description of how it works is a must-hear.
  • Another terrific panel moderated by Jan Twombly, president of The Rhythm of Business, called “Biopharma Commercial Alliance Management Challenges.” Panelists will include Brooke Paige, CSAP, ASAP board chair and former vice president of alliance management at Pear Therapeutics; and David S. Thompson, CSAP, chief alliance officer at Eli Lilly and Company. In the long life of a successful biopharma alliance, the commercialization phase brings its own particular challenges and problems. This panel promises to be a lively discussion of such topics as how alliance managers deliver value in a commercial alliance, considerations for driving alignment in local geographies and at a corporate level, aspects of alliance governance to get right to maximize value, and much more.

I’m not indulging in hyperbole when I say that these are just a very few of the highlights. Again,  more than three-quarters of the original Summit agenda is planned  to remain intact—including preconference workshops, single-speaker presentations, illuminating panel discussions, and of course, valuable networking opportunities.

We know there are many factors governing decisions on where to travel and why—especially under current conditions. But we’re confident that even after shifting to the June dates, we’ll be fielding a stellar lineup at the Summit in Tampa—one you’ll want to be present for. If you haven’t registered yet and/or for whatever reason were uncertain about attending in March, you now have some extra time to decide.

Additionally, the Renaissance has set up a new block of rooms at our discounted rate of $219.00+ per night. To book your room for the new conference dates, please click on the link below:

https://www.marriott.com/event-reservations/reservation-link.mi?id=1583953400577&key=GRP&app=resvlink

Let’s all try to plan for normal again! Won’t you join us? I hope to see you in Tampa!

Tags:  alliances  Amit Sinha  biopharma  Brooke Paige  Dan Rippey  Dana Hughes  David Thompson  Ecosystems  Eli Lilly and Company  Equinix  Jan Twombly  Jeffrey Hurley  Mark Coflin  Microsoft  P2P  partners  Pfizer  Steve Steinhilber  Takeda  The Rhythm of Business  Vantage Partners  WorkSpan 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 
Page 1 of 85
1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6  >   >>   >| 
For more information email us at info@strategic-alliances.org or call +1-781-562-1630