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ASAP BioPharma Conference Keynoter Dr. Sam Nussbaum: ’An Industry under Siege Must Take on a Different Social Contract’

Posted By John W. DeWitt, Wednesday, October 5, 2016

A couple of weeks ago, renowned physician Dr. Samuel Nussbaum—who served as chief medical officer for Anthem through 16 years of dramatic change in the healthcare industry—took the stage at the Sept. 7-9, 2016 ASAP BioPharma Conference in Boston with a big grin, twinkling eyes, and an embrace of new ASAP Chairman Brooke Paige. Paige introduced Dr. Nussbaum and noted that speaking in Boston was a homecoming for “America’s Physician,” who trained in internal medicine at Massachusetts General and then in endocrinology at Harvard. Indeed, Nussbaum, who is now strategic consultant for EGB Advisors, paid homage to the Boston and Cambridge, Mass., area’s medical science history and still-expanding potential for academic partnerships.

“One only has to go a few blocks west of here to see where Merck began to work with Harvard; Novartis has a research center near MIT in Cambridge,” Nussbaum noted. Then he turned serious. “It’s great to be here,” he began, “but it’s also an extraordinary time in healthcare, an industry, a space, under siege. It’s no longer fully understandable to say we discover, we cure, we make health better for the world. One has to take on a different social contract … and drive collaboration.”

Nussbaum echoed Dickens’ famous description of the Elizabethan era in England.

“We live at a time which is unprecedented. It’s the best of times, because we are in an age of unprecedented advances in medical technology and human science, yet it’s the worst of times, because we have a healthcare system in the US and around the world that doesn’t provide access for everyone. The state of public health is not a focus; the quality of medical care doesn’t keep pace with the science. Looking back to halcyon days, we had a great healthcare system [in the US] and research leading to some of the most extraordinary advances in healthcare. Yet we have storm clouds on the horizon.”

Nussbaum discussed a variety of driving forces vs. restraining forces

  • Breakthrough science vs. affordability for government and private payers
  • Personalized medicine vs. reputation issues
  • Technology, big data, bioinformatics vs. value-based payment models, bundled payment
  • Patient-centered outcomes and clinical design vs. impact of consolidation

He juxtaposed several triumphs of modern medicine with what has become a key factor in recent news coverage of the pharma industry and in the run-up to 2016 US presidential election.

“Cardiac death rates dramatically reduced. Antiviral drugs transform HIV into a chronic illness vs. a killer. And screening and better drugs improve cancer survival. But there is anger, there is outrage,” over high-profile drug price increases in the US and lack of access in other places in the world. “Why are people so angry? Because they can’t afford, and as nations, we can’t afford, the cost of healthcare,” he said. “Over the last decade, the average US family wage hasn’t changed much—from $49,309 to $53,800. Why the movement to Sanders or Trump? Capitalizing on outrage.”

He further explained the context of this outrage—and why expanded coverage (in Massachusetts and across the US under Obama’s Affordable Care Act) hasn’t been the cure-all for healthcare in the US.

“Massachusetts was the first state to have universal coverage. It was done under ‘Romney Care,’ similar to ‘Obamacare,” he said. The problem? “In Massachusetts, healthcare costs went up $5.1 billion and everyone applauded that type of access. But look what happened to other essential services: public health spending down 40 percent; mental health spending down 33 percent, etc.” In other words, Nussbaum explained, “We stole from what are called the social determinants of health. We know that education and housing leads to better health and better health outcomes,” while costing less. In other words, prevention costs much less than the healthcare cure.

“More importantly,” Nussbaum continued, “we are not using our $3.2 billion wisely—30-40 percent of healthcare spending is wasted on unnecessary services, administrative costs, prices, fraud. This is what we have to contend with. That’s why it is about collaboration, why it is the focus of the Obama administration, and of private business, to introduce reforms.”

Don’t miss “Dr. Sam Nussbaum: Healing the US Healthcare System One Politician at a Time,” my colleague Genevieve Fraser’s previous blog coverage of Dr. Nussbaum’s keynote address

Tags:  Anthem  ASAP BioPharma Conference  big data  bioinformatics  Brooke Paige  bundled payment  Dr. Samuel Nussbaum  driving forces vs. restraining forces  EGB Advisors  Harvard  healthcare  Merck  MIT  Novartis  Personalized medicine  reputation issues  Technology  value-based payment models 

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‘Design in Pencil’ as You Integrate Change into the Design Thinking Process (Part Three): How Alliance Teams Build an Experience Map, Grapple with Challenges, and Iterate

Posted By Genevieve Fraser, Monday, October 3, 2016
Updated: Friday, September 30, 2016

As you work through the design thinking process and apply it to your partnerships, you are building techniques to reach a decision, and you are learning to work together. With an alliance team and two core partners, you can get at an aligned recommendation or proposal. The ideal is to brainstorm and map out the most efficient way partners can get to the most effective process to come to a proposal. Then bring the partners together and arrive at a decision. Instead of “You have your way and I have mine,” ask “What is the alliance way?”

Now participants in the “Using Design Thinking to Drive Speed, Innovation, and Alignment in Partnering” workshop are exploring how to build an experience map. At this point in the 90-minute interactive session at the Sept. 7-9, 2016 ASAP BioPharma Conference in Boston, ASAP board member Jan Twombly, CSAP, and her partner at The Rhythm of Business, Bentley University professor Jeff Shuman, Ph.D., CSAP, are leading breakout groups through the process, advising executives to:

  • Step back and focus on empathic needs using their emotional intelligence.
  • Define what the empathic needs are for the co-diagnostic partner.
  • Report back to the larger project team—scientists, governance bodies, and other stakeholders.
  • Brainstorm with the larger group in mind.
  • Accelerate the delivery process, and eliminate elements can slow the process down.
  • Separate decision making into a core group for brainstorming and a companion diagnostics partners group.
  • Question if either party has experience. If both or neither have experience, then negotiate.

It’s critically important for alliance managers to drive the process and ensure it’s actually happening. Establish a collaboration leadership team; compare the companions in a diagnostic space and find companion diagnostic partners. Define the objective of the proposal and components. Both parties should come up with a short list of partners. There should be a joint evaluation process before asking for project approval. Get feedback, and redesign the prototype loop. Bring leaders and managers together to do this. Obtain a joint alliance management agreement on a new design. Relaunch the collaboration, implement from both partners, and plan for a joint development.

  • Two groups should come together and define a shared problem or goal.
  • Identify the problems.
  • Bring back to the company collective and individual brainstorming and group feedback.
  • Finalize and propose to the steering committee.

Approach Issues with Partners—and Build Iteration into the Process

Implementation

There is a skill to defining assumptions that may turn out to be true, or not true. Engage people, and roll it out to create a social charter, and stick to it. When looking at the final piece—look to iterate. You may find you didn’t get the question right, or you may discover you didn’t understand and so-and-so needed to be brought into the process. Question: Are you delivering the design experience? Make sure you find measures that define it. Prior to the proposal being presented to governance, make sure everyone has bought in.

As part of the workshop, groups were formed and asked to identify three assumptions inherent in the process they designed. Additionally, they were asked to assess the following: What is the most critical assumption you have made, and if it’s wrong, what is the impact? 

Group responses:

  • People won’t be candid or transparent or participate in individual conversations.
  • The development team is vetting the plan properly, and it was checked for joint alignment.
  • Both teams want to work jointly and collaborate. Or do they think they know best?  
  • They assume the other company has experience, but they may not have the experience or data needed.
  • In the list of shared attributes, make sure the internal list matches up. If not, it won’t pass governance.
  • You don’t need hard data numbers to prove or disprove the assumption.

Final thoughts

ID assumptions.  Use iteration. Move forward and focus on the intended outcome.  Start the intended experience, and map backwards. All stakeholders must get their needs satisfied; if not, they will stick out their foot and stop the process. Give power to partners if you wish to engage in a productive and collaborative process.

Tags:  alliance managers  alliance teams  Bentley University  biopharma  collaboration  decision making  design thinking  healthcare  Jan Twombly  Jeff Shuman  leadership team  non-asset based alliances  partnering  partners  The Rhythm of Business 

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‘Design in Pencil’ as You Integrate Change into the Design Thinking Process, Part II: Alliance Execs Explore the Culture of Creativity from Inspiration to Iteration

Posted By Genevieve Fraser, Friday, September 30, 2016

Throughout the fast-paced workshop, “Using Design Thinking to Drive Speed, Innovation, and Alignment in Partnering” at the Sept. 7-9, 2016 ASAP BioPharma Conference in Boston, ASAP board member Jan Twombly, CSAP, and her partner at The Rhythm of Business, Bentley University business professor Jeff Shuman, Ph.D., CSAP, focused on real-life scenarios biopharma alliance teams encounter, such as partnering with multiple partners, non-asset based alliances, and partnering with other sectors that run on much faster clock speeds than is typically seen in biopharma. 

“If the end goal is ‘getting there’ despite these complexities, whatever ‘getting there’ has been determined to be will set off an exhaustive testing and learning cycle in a high-uncertainty environment,” Shuman explained. For many, this may involve developing new cultural behaviors for the team, referred to as a “culture of creativity.” In the arts and design world, the expectation is that the process involves creation and change, where art forms of whatever medium are created and altered or edited in a series of steps considered native to the process. But because we operate in a more linear environment, one project or task at a time, the need to pivot and change direction may seem like a form of failure. For some, iteration does not come easy, yet it is integral to the ultimate success of a project.

In the “how” of “getting there,” the first step involves clarifying the motivations, perceptions and beliefs of stakeholders in the inspiration phase, engaging in a process of discovery and inquiry to hone in on the core question to answer. This is especially important when working with multiple partners because each team comes with its own set of corporate cultural values and language.

In working with a partner, Twombly emphasized, work within a framework of give-and-get thinking.  “Look at their needs first, what is it you need to do to help them to get what they need, and they will do the same for you. Visualize success and how it is different than what has been done in the past. Then test the idea in a safe situation. Map it out, and role play as a test.”

Drawing from one of the “greatest hits” of business strategy, the workshop focus turned to techniques outlined in Google Ventures’ five-day sprint, which can be used to launch products and build services. The sprint gives a team a shortcut to learning, by starting with a journey or experience map where you map out a problem and pick a place to focus. In the case of biopharma and healthcare, the focus might be on how patients access a new product faster. Following the mapping phase, you brainstorm competing solutions. Next, you move on to making decisions and creating a testable hypothesis. Then comes a prototype, and finally, testing.

“Start with the end. What is the objective? Who are the players?” Jan and Jeff asked the gathering. Jan warned that in brainstorming, most don’t do it well.  It’s important to stay focused on the question and come up with as many ideas as possible and then to prioritize.

Part III of our “Design in Pencil” story will discuss how to build an experience map for teams, grapple with issues that arise, and build iteration into the design thinking process. 

Tags:  alliance teams  ASAP BioPharma Conference  Bentley University  biopharma  healthcare  Jan Twombly  Jeff Shuman  non-asset based alliances  partnering  The Rhythm of Business 

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Two Studies Provide Valuable Economic and Financial Metrics To Support Partnering and Revenues

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Wednesday, September 14, 2016

ASAP unveiled a landmark alliance management study to a packed room at the Revere Hotel in Boston, a block from the Boston Common, during the recent 2016 ASAP BioPharma Conference, “New Faces, Unexpected Places in Partnering: The Foresight to Lead, the Foundation to Succeed,” which took place Sept. 7-9. The session “Applying the Latest Alliance Management Research to Your Partnering Practice” introduced the ASAP-commissioned 6th State of Alliance study, “The Economics of Alliances, Social Capital, and Alliance Performance,” researched and authored by Dr. Shawn Wilson, DBA, vice president and general manager at Beaulieu Group. The report provides economic and financial metrics based on extensive research and data analysis. "What is so important about this report is that it's the first time alliance management studies have gathered defined economic or financial outcomes as well as provided recommendations for improvement,” pointed out Michael Leonetti, CSAP, CEO of the Association of Strategic Alliance Professionals, during the session introduction. The session also included a presentation by Stuart Kliman, CA-AM, co-founder of Vantage Partners, on his company’s 2015 study “Transcending Organizational Barriers—A Cross-Industry View of Alliance Management Trends and Challenges.” Part I of this blog focuses on Wilson’s key findings. 

If you attended the ASAP BioPharma Conference last week or in years past, chances are you’re working for a successful company that has great balance and capability sheets, as well as skilled managers supporting company alliances. If you’re only concerned about the visible firm profile, however, you may miss the iceberg below the surface—the more massive structural configurations, norms, meanings, and work systems. Those subsurface dynamics can be swirling with conflict, which is why Dr. Shawn Wilson of Beaulieu Group, one of the world’s largest floorcovering manufacturers, did a deep dive about a year ago with a three-stage study that included qualitative interviews, a pilot study, and quantitative study of social capital. The consultant, published author, and researcher affiliated with Georgia’s Kennesaw State University worked with ASAP to provide new financial and economic ROI analytics that reflect partnering best practices. The study is based on the finding of three distinct dimensions of social capital: structural, cognitive, and relational. 

Social capital is the aggregate informal resources available to an individual, group, or institution that is generated by positive interactions. It effectively facilitates interactions, acting as a catalyst for inter- and intra-organizational transactions. Wilson used the concept of social capital as a tool to explore the tougher dynamics between organizations—and the potential to alleviate organizational problems in transactions and other interactions. 

“Social capital can be a force that pulls firms together or pushes them away. The more those dimensions of social capital push firms away, the longer the bridge needs to become in an alliance,” observed Wilson. “One of the biggest challenges firms have is that they overestimate what spans the bridge.” He then begged the question: “Were we successful because of the unknown factors under the iceberg?” 

The audience was then asked to consider a strong relationship between two people. “That strong relational tie doesn’t mean there will be strong ties when the entire family gets together,” he pointed out.  Now consider the failed alliance between Tesla and Toyota, which started as a friendship between the two CEOs, he continued.  “The mismatch between the two firms was too much for the alliance to bear.” 

The second finding from the study is that “the right kind of experience counts,” he said. The data don’t show that social capital improves when relationships strengthen; when it comes to an alliance executive’s experience, it’s not about the tools brought in. It’s about how to measure up to a firm’s potential partnership through nuance, he added. 

The third finding? Companies with above-average social capital outperformed their peers. The financial measures were much higher when perceptual measures were met, such as satisfaction, the accomplishment of strategic objectives, and stability. 

Watch for Part II of our coverage on “Applying the Latest Alliance Management Research to Your Partnering Practice,” Stuart Kliman’s presentation of Vantage Partner’s study “Transcending Organizational Barriers—A Cross-Industry View of Alliance Management Trends and Challenges.” You can read more about ASAP’s 6th State of Alliances in the Summer 2016 Strategic Alliance Magazine.

Tags:  6th State of Alliance  alliance  alliance management  Beaulieu Group  Dr. Shawn Wilson  economic and financial metrics  economic ROI analytics  Michael Leonetti  partnering best practices  partnerships  perceptual measures  social capital  Stuart Kliman  Tesla  tools  Toyota  Vantage Partners 

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‘Design in Pencil’ as You Integrate Change into the Design Thinking Process (Part One): BioPharma Partnering Execs Explore How to ‘Get Smart Quickly’ and ‘Change as Needed’

Posted By Genevieve Fraser, Tuesday, September 13, 2016

Participants packed the “Using Design Thinking to Drive Speed, Innovation, and Alignment in Partnering” workshop at the Sept. 7-9, 2016 ASAP BioPharma Conference in Boston, diving into the 90-minute session to gain insight into design thinking as an innovative strategy that can be applied to alliance management.

Though design as a way of thinking in the sciences was explored as early as the late 1960s, the approach was expanded on by Rolf Faste at Stanford University in the 1980s and 90s. Design thinking was adapted for business purposes by Faste's Stanford colleague, David M. Kelley, who in 1991 founded IDEO, which focuses on a human-centered approach to innovative, problem-solving solutions.

Led by ASAP board member Jan Twombly, CSAP, and her partner at The Rhythm of Business, Bentley University professor, Jeff Shuman, Ph.D., CSAP, the interactive session drew from IDEO as well as an IBM model that can be adapted to help alliance management teams solve problems at the speed and scale today’s corporate world demands. The workshop was designed to provide participants with proven tools and techniques that can immediately be put to use to align operating processes—or to address any complex problem. 

“When you know what you need to learn, you can get smart quickly,” Twombly stated as she explained how the design thinking process defines the problem and then uses the basic framework to arrive at desired customer process and outcomes.  Implementation of the solution always involves the needs of the end user.  However, iteration, the repetition of a process, is key to assessing outcomes and implementing change. And the iterations change as you begin to think smarter, she said. 

“You need to identify assumptions, and then ID info that was derived from that assumption and decide if the assumption was good or bad. But do it in pencil,” Twombly warned the group. “Give yourselves the opportunity to change as needed. Take time out of the process to do this.”

Key points in assessing end user needs and gaining other stakeholders’ inputs:

  • Interview with empathy, put stakeholders at ease, talk to invoke stories, give examples, and be specific.
  • Question statements—repeat back what you’ve heard to arrive at “yes” in an agreement and move forward.
  • Look for inconsistency and for nonverbal cues, such as, hesitation in a voice and areas that need to be worked through.
  • Do not ask leading questions and don’t give them the answers—let them come up with the truth of how they think and feel.
  • Find ways to work so you can be more efficient and effective.

Twombly cautioned that when working in tandem with another group, act as a joint think tank where you both develop a concept and don’t develop competing concepts in isolation and then fight over them. Think of how others might feel if the proposal they worked on, on their own, was roundly rejected. She then asked the participants grouped by tables to develop three questions that need to be asked of team member. 

At this point in the workshop, Shuman began to actively work with the groups. The questions needed to look at “what we’ve experienced that gets at what was wrong with the process.” The purpose of the questions is to generate design strategy from design thinking. Questions developed by the groups included:

  • What is frustrating about the ways we collaborate?
  • What is the value of meetings?
  • What about this process keeps you up at night?
  • What do you think is working about the collaboration?  What isn’t working?
  • How do you feel the meeting is going?  Be candid.
  • What defines a great collaboration meeting?  What does it accomplish?

“Use the questioning process to see what matters and then base your design on it,” Twombly said. “Ask why and how. It’s always good to gather data in pairs. One asks questions and one captures data. Order the answers in a series of needs statements, as in: 

Question: Why do we need more efficient acceleration?

Answer: We need greater efficiency to drive the agenda, to get the product to the customer.

Question:  If that is why, then how do we get there? 

Stay tuned to the ASAP Blog for Part Two of our coverage of Twombly and Shuman’s design thinking workshop, as well as continued blog posts about other informative and provocative sessions that ASAP Media team covered during last week’s 2016 ASAP BioPharma Conference at the Revere Hotel Boston Common. 

Tags:  alliance management  Bentley University  collaboration  customer  David M. Kelley  design thinking  IBM  IDEO  innovative strategy  Jan Twombly  Jeff Shuman  problem-solving solutions  Rolf Faste  stakeholders  Stanford University  The Rhythm of Business 

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