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The Virtuous Cycle in Alliance Management—a Summit Spotlight Exclusive (Part 2)

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Tuesday, March 5, 2019
Updated: Monday, March 4, 2019

“The alliance manager’s role is to understand the importance of timing,” advises Christine Carberry, CSAP, in Part One of ASAP Media’s interview with the seasoned alliance manager and former chief operating officer of Keryx Biopharmaceuticals (now a subsidiary of Akebia Therapeutics). Carberry, who also previously served as chair of the ASAP board of directors, will be providing a leadership spotlight plenary session, “Collaborate-Create: The Value of the Virtuous Cycle,” at the 2019 ASAP Global Alliance Summit, “Agile Partnering in Today’s Collaborative Ecosystem,” March 10-13 at the Westin Fort Lauderdale Beach Resort in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. ASAP Media’s conversation with Carberry continues below.

Carberry’s role for six months of her year working for Keryx was as co-leader of integration planning with counterpart Akebia. Early on, she realized that her role wouldn’t continue with the new organization. She is philosophical about it. “You are working on trying to have everybody see the value of the merger—employees in the companies, investors, and shareholders. Yet people know you are not going to be part of it,” she explains of the challenge. “It’s about taking the time, if you can, to explore and not think that you have to jump right back into doing exactly what you were doing. Each experience leads to another.”

Alliance mangers are seekers of “the high road” trying to rise above conflict and egos, and keeping everyone focused on the common goal.  “You’re really a navigator,” she adds. “One of the criticisms that we’ve heard is alliance managers need to think of themselves much more broadly. And think of themselves as the people always looking for a portfolio of alliances and expanding value, not just be within the confines of agreements that you have today. That’s the challenge I want to give to the audience [at the Summit] in thinking about how we can have a greater impact by making better, stronger connections between ideas and resources, creating better conditions for collaboration. Your alliance portfolio is dynamic, and I think that alliance managers can create more value by really understanding that one alliance is one piece of a company portfolio and needs to align with company strategy.”

Before her one-year stint with Keryx, Carberry spent three and a half years with FORUM Pharmaceuticals (formerly EnVivo Pharmaceuticals) and 26 years with Biogen, where she stated out in an entry-level position during a time when genetic engineering was “scary science.” Biogen was a Fortune 500 international company that brought several drugs to patients “that changed their lives,” she adds. 

Despite being in transition between jobs, Carberry has “a very full plate.” In addition to her spotlight plenary session, as chairman emerita of ASAP, she will attend the Summit board and advisory meetings and will lead a roundtable about alliance management in a crisis situation. “It’s similar to what I’ve done in other transitional periods. It allows me to increase involvement in leadership roles,” she says.

Learn about Carberry’s talk and other leadership sessions and register for the 2019 ASAP Global Alliance Summit at http://asapsummit.org. See the ASAP Media team’s comprehensive before, during, and after coverage of the 2019 Summit in Strategic Alliance publications and on the ASAP blog.  

Tags:  Akebia Therapeutics  Alliance Excellence Award  alliance manager  Christine Carberry  conflict  digital  expanding value  Keryx Biopharmaceuticals  partnership  Patheon  strategic partner  technology  Thermo Fisher 

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The Virtuous Cycle in Alliance Management—a Summit Spotlight Exclusive (Part 1)

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Tuesday, March 5, 2019
Updated: Monday, March 4, 2019

“There is a time and purpose for everything. So the alliance manager’s role is to understand the importance of timing.” Thus advises Christine Carberry, CSAP, a seasoned alliance manager and former chief operating officer of Keryx Biopharmaceuticals (now a subsidiary of Akebia Therapeutics). Carberry, who also previously served as chair of the ASAP board of directors, will be providing a leadership spotlight session “Collaborate-Create: The Value of the Virtuous Cycle” at the 2019 ASAP Global Alliance Summit, “Agile Partnering in Today’s Collaborative Ecosystem,” March 10-13 at the Westin Fort Lauderdale Beach Resort in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

A virtuous cycle connects right ideas with right resources in the right timing, she continues. “Timing is part of creating the right environment for collaboration and pulling those pieces together and then generating value,” Carberry explains. “That value often generates new ideas that just feed back into it. Growing new ideas may mean you need different kinds of resources. You may have an idea on how to improve a patient’s experience in a clinical trial. From that, you may come up with an idea that there’s a way to make that experience better using technology. Now you need different resources and skillsets to improve the patient experience in a digital way.”

Carberry’s talk is based on 30 years of management experience. Right now, she is between companies after Keryx Biopharmaceuticals and Akebia Therapeutics merged in December. The two companies are under consideration for a 2019 ASAP Alliance Excellence Award for their handling of a supply disruption where patients could not obtain a jointly manufactured drug. Access resumed after the companies teamed togetherfrom the C-level to the operational teamsto create a quick, viable solution.  

 

 “We had to navigate this partnership when Patheon merged with Fisher, and Keryx with Akebia,” Carberry explains. “Traditionally, biopharma companies treat CMOs as vendors, not as collaborators. … Applying all of the ASAP approaches and tools to the CMO I think creates a much stronger partnership, and it was demonstrated in this supply disruption situation. We needed high levels of trust with CEO engagement. It wasn’t business as usual. It was requiring people to go above and beyond,” she continues. “Agile is a good word for it. That willingness to be flexible and agile is less likely to happen if you are treating your CMO as a vendor rather than as strategic partner. “

 

See the ASAP Blog for Part Two of this interview with Christine Carberry, CSAP. Learn about Carberry’s plenary talk and other leadership sessions at the 2019 ASAP Global Alliance Summit, and register for the event, at http://asapsummit.org. See the ASAP Media team’s comprehensive before, during, and after coverage of the 2019 Summit in Strategic Alliance publications and on the ASAP blog.  

Tags:  Akebia Therapeutics  Alliance Excellence Award  alliance manager  Christine Carberry  digital  Keryx Biopharmaceuticals  partnership  Patheon  strategic partner  technology  Thermo Fisher 

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Awards Finalists Describe Complex Joint Venture for a New Vaccine—Part 2

Posted By ASAP Media, Wednesday, February 27, 2019

Merck Vaccines and Sanofi Pasteur are finalists for a 2019 ASAP Alliance Excellence Award to be presented at the upcoming ASAP Global Alliance Summit, “Agile Partnering in Today’s Collaborative Ecosystem,” March 11-13 at the Westin Fort Lauderdale Beach Resort in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. The companies built a joint venture for a new drug utilizing a governance model inspired by small, nimble biotech companies to ensure speed and flexibility. The commercialization phase of the new drug has been very successful. In Part 2 of this blog post, ASAP Media asked Jean-Phillipe Proust and Chris Scirrotto of Sanofi Pasteur and Eric Skjeveland of Merck Vaccines about governance, agile practices, and lessons learned in developing the very complex joint venture.  See Part 1 of this blog post for additional information on this alliance.

How was the governance model provided for the new vaccine joint venture?

The governance framework was patterned after smaller companies that must rely on a leaner and more agile operating model. A small but seasoned team with significant operational and alliance management experience designed the governance structure, including team charters for all committees with clear and simplified operating principles, decision making, and escalation procedures. After a few rounds of evolution due to the maturity of the product, the core governance model is the same today, but remains flexible to adjust according to the market needs.   

The model sounds agilein what ways did speed and flexibility enhance the vaccine development?

Although this product has taken decades to develop, over the last few years the teams continually looked for opportunities to improve communication, processes, and effectively use the governance to stay aligned with respect to the joint venture.

How was the model different than previous models used by your companies?

We decided to start fresh with this new company and focus on what would work best for this JV and tried not to influence our processes and decision making based on previous models other than the lessons learned where governance models were overly complex and not agile.   

Would you describe the process used as “agile partnering?”

With respect to both company’s long-standing processes and cultures, it was imperative that we create a framework that was light and nimble, avoiding the heavy processes that can slow down decision making and the ability to react to evolving market conditions in a compliant manner.    

What have the overall results/beneficial outcomes been for your companies and partner?

We believe we have created a long-lasting joint venture that will support VAXELIS for many years to come. The joint venture has reached and even overpassed budget objectives after the first two years in the EU. On the people side, the employees are energized and proud to be part of the joint project.  In fact, the opportunity to be a part of the joint venture is attracting new talent to the JV.       

Have there been any surprising lessons learned? 

Competitors with different cultures and organizations can work together when they have a common vision, shared interests, and a committed team operating in a compliant way. The lessons learned throughout this journey were not always anticipated. However, working as one team we were always able to adapt and adjust as needed.

See Part 1 of this blog post for further information on the 2019 ASAP Alliance Excellence Awards and the Merck Vaccine and Sanofi Pasteur alliance. And stay tuned for additional awards coverage on the ASAP blog and in the monthly and quarterly Strategic Alliance magazines.

Tags:  Alliance health checks alliance management ASAP  

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Awards Finalists Describe Complex Joint Venture for a New Vaccine—Part 1

Posted By ASAP Media, Wednesday, February 27, 2019

Merck Vaccines and Sanofi Pasteur are finalists for a 2019 ASAP Alliance Excellence Award to be presented at the upcoming ASAP Global Alliance Summit, “Agile Partnering in Today’s Collaborative Ecosystem,” March 11-13 at the Westin Fort Lauderdale Beach Resort in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. The companies built a joint venture for a new drug utilizing a governance model inspired by small, nimble biotech companies to ensure speed and flexibility. The commercialization phase of the new drug has been very successful. ASAP Media asked Jean-Phillipe Proust and Chris Scirrotto of Sanofi Pasteur, and Eric Skjeveland of Merck Vaccines to respond to these questions to help our readers better understand the processes used to develop the very complex joint venture, and why it’s noteworthy for the alliance management community.

Why did you apply for an ASAP Alliance Excellence Award?

We thought the alliance management community would be interested in our experiences bringing two large vaccine companies together, with different organizations and cultures, in order to create an agile European structure able to adjust and adapt to the new market condition in Europe (MCM Vaccine BV). At the same time, these two companies were closing a long-lasting, full-scale joint venture in the same market geographya very complex undertaking that ended up successfully.   

What drug was developed?

VAXELIS is an infant hexavalent combination vaccine that helps to protect against six diseasesdiphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), poliomyelitis, hepatitis B and invasive disease due to H. influenzae type b.  This complex global product has taken more than 15 years to develop and launch in the European Union market. The six antigens in this vaccine are produced and packaged using five different facilities in four countries between EU and North America.   

What best practices did you use to improve alliance management practices and enhance the outcome?

  • Aligned and clear objectives: These were established early on and used as guideposts when making decisions on how the alliance would be structured, the framework of the governance model, and dispute resolution.
  • Trust level needed to improve: We moved from a neutral level of trust following the decision to dismantle the SPMSD joint venture, through several stages of building trust rather quickly.  The MCM joint team is now truly at a partnership level, where we respect the differences in thinking and culture of both organizations. We have a shared vision for VAXELIS, conduct shared planning sessions among those that are assigned to the joint venture, and amicably resolve our differences.
  • Fairness: Partnerships need to be built on a true win-win basis. If during the negotiation one of the parties gets the impression of imbalance, the future and outcomes will be less certain; in a negotiation for a sustainable, long partnership, the goal is to find a balanced compromise.
  • Active sponsorship from senior leadership: Senior leaders are involved not only at the joint steering committee level, but routinely participate in team meetings for the joint venture, etc.  They make a concerted effort to be visible and support the joint venture.
  • Structure and governance: Established an effective and efficient governance framework, including team charters for all governance committees with clear and simplified operating principles, decision making, and escalation procedures. We made the decision to operate and build the partnership with a “biotech spirit” with a dedicated, limited team empowered to make decisions and move quickly.
  • Created a collaborative culture: The partners have shared values and behaviors such as: open, two-way communication among those that are assigned to the joint venture, agreement to disagree respectfully and address issues early, honor and respect of differences in company culture and approach, and operation in a transparent manner with respect to the joint venture.
  • MCM Annual Meeting: Merck Vaccines and Sanofi Pasteur conduct a global MCM annual meeting, which brings together the key staff supporting the joint venture to celebrate past year successes, share lessons learned, and plan for the upcoming year for VAXELIS. A good portion of the meeting time is dedicated to F2F governance meetings for the product.
  • Alliance health checks: These were conducted twice during the first 18 months, which helped us course correct. An important finding on the Merck side was that there were too many people partially involved in the JV, which was creating unnecessary complexity and communication. We streamlined the number of people involved in the alliance and asked for a higher percentage of their time.

See Part 2 of this blog post for further information on the 2019 ASAP Alliance Excellence Awards and the Merck Vaccine and Sanofi Pasteur alliance. And stay tuned for additional awards coverage on the ASAP blog and in the monthly and quarterly Strategic Alliance magazines.

Tags:  Alliance health checks  alliance management  ASAP Alliance Excellence Awards  biotech  Chris Scirrotto  collaborative culture  commercialization phase  dispute resolution  Eric Skjeveland  governance model  Jean-Phillipe Proust  joint venture  Merck Vaccines  negotiation  Sanofi Pasteur 

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Leaders ‘in a Time of Rapid Growth and Change’: Finalists for Announced for 2019 ASAP Alliance Excellence Awards

Posted By Noel B. Richards, Friday, February 15, 2019

Finalists Include Alcon Laboratories, Science Applications International Corporation, Keryx Biopharmaceuticals (subsidiary of Akebia Therapeutics), Thermo Fisher Scientific, Merck & Co., Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Cambridge Assessment English, Novartis, Incyte, Sanofi Pasteur, and Red Hat 

ASAP will honor companies and organizations, practices, and programs that exemplify exceptional performance in alliance management during the ASAP Alliance Excellence Awards ceremony at the 2019 ASAP Global Alliance Summit, which runs March 11-13 at the Westin Fort Lauderdale Beach Resort in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. This month, ASAP announced the companies that are 2019 Alliance Excellence Awards finalists: Alcon Laboratories, Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), Keryx Biopharmaceuticals (now a subsidiary of Akebia Therapeutics), Thermo Fisher Scientific, Merck & Co., Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Cambridge Assessment English, Novartis, Incyte, Sanofi Pasteur, and Red Hat. See the official press release issued via PRWeb.

“This remarkable group of companies has demonstrated significant leadership in alliance management during a time of rapid growth and change for business—and for the partnering profession,” said Michael Leonetti, president & CEO of ASAP. “Our awards committee reviewed a number of outstanding nominees from diverse industries this year, and we’re pleased to recognize these exceptional partners and programs whose success stories and practices can serve as models for the alliance management community.”

Alcon Laboratories’ alliance program contains a complete set of fully documented best practices supported by information technology tools. With a small alliance group, they manage many partners through consistency applying these practices and tools.

 

Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) has developed an alliance program covers not only the “hard” alliance elements, but also pays attention to the “softer” rules of the game, resulting in substantial contribution to revenues as well as recognition from partners. Partner tiering is consistently worked out across the strategic, financial, and relational elements of business.

 

Keryx Biopharmaceuticals (now a subsidiary of Akebia Therapeutics) and Thermo Fisher Scientific collaborated to resolve supply constraints to ensure that patients were able to access Keryx’s proprietary drug through agility and excellent teamwork at all levels of operation.

 

Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany–Bristol-Myers Squibb’s alliance has operated with financial transparency and consistent best practices since its formation in China in the 1990s, a time when the Chinese market was much less accessible.

 

Novartis–Incyte’s decade-long collaboration covers the co-marketing and co-development of an oncology drug in split geographical areas. The alliance has applied best practices across the alliance lifecycle, and led the way for a foundation for a broader alliance mindset in the respective organizations.


Merck & Co. and Sanofi Pasteur built a joint venture for a new drug utilizing a governance model inspired by small, nimble biotech companies to ensure speed and flexibility. The commercialization phase of the new drug so far is very successful.

 

Red Hat completely revamped an alliance training program for its alliance and channel managers, providing a clear learning path for everyone with several checkpoints and feedback options that support managers in their learning. The alliance program has leveraged e-learning and digitization, supported by well-designed management processes.

Cambridge Assessment English teamed up with Future Learn and Crisis Classroom to deliver an online training program for volunteers who help refugees meet refugee needs by focusing on language support. Volunteers (8,000 thus far have signed up) are able to exchange their experience in addition to accessing formal learning modules.

 

Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany developed its Joint Committee Self-Assessment tool after alliance surveys showed that decision-making in the organization’s alliances were too slow. This easily implemented tool helps committees improve their decision making has become standard in the Merck alliance toolkit.

Read the complete press release on PRWeb at http://www.prweb.com/releases/finalists_for_announced_for_2019_asap_alliance_excellence_awards/prweb16099885.htm. Stay tuned for much more coverage of the 2019 finalists and the stories behind their successes on this blog and in Strategic Alliance Quarterly and Monthly magazines.

Tags:  Akebia  Alcon  alliance  ASAP Alliance Excellence Awards  best practices  Bristol-Myers Squibb  Cambridge Assessment English  governance  Incyte  Keryx Biopharmaceuticals  Merck & Co.  Merck KGaA  Novartis  Red Hat  Sanofi Pasteur  Science Applications International Corporation  Thermo Fisher Scientific  toolkit 

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