My Profile   |   Print Page   |   Contact Us   |   Sign In   |   Register
ASAP Blog
Blog Home All Blogs
Welcome to ASAP Blog, the best place to stay current regarding upcoming events, member companies, the latest trends, and leaders in the industry. Blogs are posted at least once a week; members may subscribe to receive notifications when new blogs are posted by clicking the "Subscribe" link above.

 

Search all posts for:   

 

Top tags: alliance management  alliances  collaboration  partnering  alliance  partner  partners  partnerships  alliance managers  ecosystem  alliance manager  The Rhythm of Business  partnership  Jan Twombly  Vantage Partners  biopharma  Eli Lilly and Company  governance  strategy  Strategic Alliance Magazine  IBM  collaborations  IoT  strategic alliances  ASAP BioPharma Conference  cloud  innovation  Christine Carberry  Cisco  healthcare 

Playing the Strategic Alliance Game: The 2112 Group’s Larry Walsh Provides an ‘ASAP Quick Takes’ Talk on Smart Moves and Strategy at the 2016 ASAP Global Alliance Summit

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Wednesday, February 24, 2016

The world of business is sometimes perceived as a giant Monopoly game, where the luck of the dice and accumulation of assets win the game. For Larry Walsh, a more appropriate analogy is a chess game, with complex and sophisticated strategy that requires foresight and skillful coordination of the “chessmen” to provide an advantage. Walsh will be sharing his perspective and strategic insights during an “ASAP Quick Takes” talk “Seeing Around the Corners is a Masterful Move on the Partnering Chessboard” March 2 at the ASAP Global Alliance Summit. This year’s Summit, “Partnering Everywhere: Expert Leadership for the Ecosystem,” is scheduled to take place March 1-4 at the Gaylord National Resort & Convention Center, National Harbor, Maryland. Patterned after the popular “TED Talks,” and well-received at the 2015 ASAP BioPharma Conference, ASAP will bring four provocative speakers to the stage to provide key, interlocking pieces about emerging ecosystems 

“Anyone who plays chess has their set of moves,” explains the chief analyst and CEO of The 2112 Group during an interview about the upcoming talk. “You know what you hope your opponent will do. It’s not so much about the element of strategy as much as why we need to do the things we need to do, and why avoiding them comes with risks. If you are focused on short-term planning, you are at risk for long-term disruption. If you fail to take into account what the opponent can and should do, you are putting yourself at risk. You need to survey and execute, making short- and long-term choices that increase success and mitigate risk.” 

A journalist, analyst, author, and industry commentator, Walsh is also the founder of Channelnomics, a leading provider of IT channel news and analysis. He is an expert and seasoned commentator on the Internet of Things, cloud computing, security, and analytics and works with clients to understand their problems and challenges, developing realistic outlooks and strategies to translate to operational frameworks for effective execution. 

“An effective strategy mirrors a vision,” he continues. “The first step in any successful venture is establishing what it is that you’re doing and why. The strategy outlines how you’re going to do it: a surveying and understanding of your landscape; an identification of where you’re going to play; your inventory, resources, and strengths; and translating all that go into how you’re going to execute your plan. Strategy developmenta critical phaseis about making choices. And if you fail to make the right ones, you often put yourself at risk.” 

He provides a current-day example: A client today has dozens of reseller partners. Two-thirds haven’t made a sale. To understand why sales are not being made, and how to get to first, second, and sustained sales, requires assessing and determining what resources are needed and to come up with a strategy and execution plan for sustained revenue generation.  One of the risks, however, is that “lots of businesses say they make choices, but they are consumed by revenue generation and don’t discriminate between good and bad decisions. They also fail to anticipate. This is where surveying the landscape equates with chess. If you don’t survey the landscape and understand your competition, you can’t anticipate what the opposition will do,” he says. 

Business is often reactionary. When launching a new product, it’s critical to estimate and survive the competition’s response, he adds. For example, Tesla wasn’t the first electric car, but it has more staying power and innovation than others because the company had a strategy. Instead of trying to build a low-end, mass-produced car, Tesla built a high-end, very expensive car. High-end products attracted high-end buyers, which allowed them to plow money back into their product, he explains: “They knew the GMs and Toyotas and Nissans would counterattack with more hybrids or low-end versions of electric cars. See how their strategy worked? Who is coming out with high-end electric cars that are more moderately priced? Porsche, Mercedes, BMW.” 

Different industries work at different paces for different reasons, sometimes to collaboration’s advantage, he notes. Collaborations can influence the pace at which data is turned into intelligence. It’s sometimes faster and more economical to partner with companies than to reinvent them. Leverage partnering strengths and offset company weaknesses for speed, efficiency, and effectiveness, he advises. “If we identify that our objective is a certain point ahead, and our resources can get us halfway there, then we need to look around for alliance partners to fill in blanks.” 

For more information on this topic, click here for Walsh’s webinar “The Channel Is Not the Best Route to Market but It Can Be,” which joins last year’s previous channel-related webinars now archived in the ASAP Member Resource Library, available for free to ASAP members (nonmembers can access for a fee). 

Tags:  analytics  ASAP Quicktakes  Channelnomics  cloud computing  collaborations  electric car  Internet of Things  IT channel news  Larry Walsh  partner  revenue generation  security  Tesla  The 2112 Group 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

From Entrepreneur to Intrapreneur in the Healthcare Industry: Marcus Wilson’s ‘ASAP Quick Takes’ Tutorial at the 2016 ASAP Global Alliance Summit

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Monday, February 22, 2016

ASAP is introducing an exciting new presentation format at the ASAP Global Alliance Summit March 1-4:  the “ASAP Quick Takes, patterned after “TED Talks” and well-received at the 2015 ASAP BioPharma Conference, will bring four provocative speakers to the stage to provide specific, complementary insights relating to emerging ecosystems. Organized around the theme “Partnering Everywhere: Expert Leadership for the Ecosystem,” the summit will be held just outside the US capital at the Gaylord National Resort & Convention Center, National Harbor, Maryland. Among the executives in the line-up is Marcus Wilson, president and co-founder of Anthem’s real-world research subsidiary, HealthCore. With reams of background information and perspective, Wilson is well-placed to speak on his topic “The Alliance Professional as Entrepreneur.” His experience as an entrepreneur has positioned him as a guiding force in his current mission to improve the safety, quality, and affordability of healthcare through data and research. He previously developed and ran the Health Outcomes and Clinical Research program for BCBS of Delaware, on which HealthCore is founded. 

ASAP Media: What are some techniques or approaches you use to jumpstart innovation and creativity as an intrapreneur? 

Marcus Wilson: Making the shift from an entrepreneur to working as an intrapreneur, I have found that there are two major concepts to embrace.  First, I advise intrapreneurs to have patience. Second, innovative concepts have to be well-socialized ahead of formal introduction. Each group or department impacted by that idea needs to be on board with the idea or subtle undermining will limit or completely inhibit progress. As we mature new concepts, we also put into our plan a “campaign” of sorts to help recruit key influencers across the enterprise. It is one step we take to pave the way for these new concepts to gain momentum. 

How is being an intrapreneur different than being an entrepreneur in your industry, and how do they accommodate alliance managers to set the stage for the next levels of meeting customer needs? 

I would imagine for some the difference is significant. Though we have dealt with significant adjustment issues over time, the conversion to being a part of a much larger organization has gone reasonably well. We sold our company to Anthem in 2003 because we felt strongly it was an important step in accomplishing our mission. They had the resources and the position within the healthcare system that would allow us to build capabilities and influence healthcare evidence development in a way we could not do as a small, independent company. Though we have certainly had our challenges, we have benefitted from a solid business structure within Anthem that preserved much of our “entrepreneurial” culture, which was well planned prior to our acquisition, and strong executive level support over the last 13 years. Our alliance managers have played, and continue to play, a key role in both our internal and external alliances. 

What kinds of changes do intrapreneurs need to make in the evolving healthcare ecosystem? 

The healthcare ecosystem can be quite complex, and I am convinced that alliance collaborations are going to be at the heart of solving some of its current issues. Ironically, I believe we can simplify the experience for the patient by collaborating across the ecosystem itself. Thus, intrapreneurial alliance managers will be collaborating in alliances of all kinds, often with multiple companies or institutions working on the same issue. I see this as a huge shift from where alliance management first began in life sciences, traditionally between partner companies of relatively equal size.  

How do you stay ahead of the curve in terms of innovation and "outside-in thinking?" 

A good entrepreneur knows that great ideas can come from literally anywhere. We need to champion this viewpoint as we work to innovate. Just this week, we were talking about the Top 10 trends in healthcare, and asking ourselves for each item: “How might this development influence our future business? How might we organize ourselves to better leverage that innovation? Are we in a unique position to bring that innovation to others?  As a novel, care research organization, what insights can we bring to a given issue?”  As this is core to our business, it is critical to maintain and harness that outside-in thinking 

How is HealthCore on the cutting-edge of intraprenuership and understanding customer needs in the evolving healthcare ecosystem? 

Our early years were spent embedded in a large group practice in Delaware. We worked to support better decision making between the physician and patient at the point of care. Many tough lessons learned in those formative years led us to begin developing innovative ways to get the right information to those two key decision makers. Since our inception in 1996, we have felt the best means of impacting patient outcomes was to influence the many decisions made prior to new drugs and technologies getting to the patient. Realizing the innovators (e.g., the pharmaceutical industry), the regulators (FDA in the US) and policymakers had a major impact on what eventually makes its way to the point of care, we positioned HealthCore squarely on the lines where healthcare stakeholders intersect. Our position gives us rare insight into the needs, priorities, and unique language of each of these stakeholders. In this effort, collaboration is key. We are owned by a payer and leverage the resources and raw materials (data and their important relationships with the providers and patients) from that payer to close critical gaps in evidence in collaboration with the industry and regulators, which facilitates better technologies getting to the market with the right evidence to support their effective use in patient care. It is often a very tough line to walk, and alliance management is essential to our success. 

Tags:  alliance management  alliances  Anthem  collaboration  data  emerging ecosystems  entrepreneur  healthcare  HealthCore  intrapreneur  life sciences  Marcus Wilson PharmD  outside-in thinking  pharmaceutical industry  policymakers  regulators  research 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

How to Partner for Open Innovation: A Sneak Preview of John Bell’s Forthcoming ‘ASAP Quick Take’ at the 2016 ASAP Global Alliance Summit

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Thursday, February 11, 2016

Addressing various facets of “partnering everywhere” in our rapidly evolving world, four experts are slated to present “ASAP Quick Takes” (patterned on the “TED Talks” format) at the ASAP Global Alliance Summit. This year’s summit is organized around the theme “Partnering Everywhere: Expert Leadership for the Ecosystem,” and will be held just outside the US capital at the Gaylord National Resort & Convention Center, National Harbor, Maryland.  

Among the executives in the ASAP Quick Takes line-up is John Bell, PhD, head of external innovation at Johnson & Johnson Consumer, who will present the talk “Creating Partnering Opportunities through Open Innovation.” Bell brings distinctive credentials: He has worked as head of strategy & new business at Philips Research, head of strategic alliances at Philips, strategy consultant at PricewaterhouseCoopers, and as an assistant professor. Despite his busy schedule and prominent daytime job, he somehow also carves out the time to teach alliance strategy at the University of Tilburg in the Netherlands. During a recent interview, I asked Bell for some insights on his upcoming ASAP presentation. 

How has Johnson & Johnson led the way in corporate alliance management through structuring and outreach? 

In the Consumer division, we work closely with start-ups and strategic suppliers. For instance, with some of our strategic suppliers, we developed a way of working that activates the innovation capabilities of these partners to come up with innovative solutions. In the past, we typically approached suppliers with the question to make a specific product at a specific price point. Today, we share with a select group of partners what kind of consumer needs we aim to solve. Their R&D and our Johnson & Johnson R&D people then start to co-create novel solutions. 

How does your hands-on workshop help alliance managers sharpen their skills and expertise to broaden alliance activities in their organization? 

By sharing some of our learnings and providing insights into the steps we have taken and are still making, we believe that alliance managers can learn what is relevant to their own organization. 

What are some of the ways Johnson and Johnson supports strategic development to capture valuable market and competitive insights? 

Johnson & Johnson has established so-called Innovation Centers in the heart of eco-systems around the globe: San Francisco, Boston, Shanghai, and London. In those Innovation Centers, there are 25 to 30 business developers, dealmakers, alliance managers, and legal and financial people. They focus on identifying and fostering innovation across the pharmaceutical, medical devices, and consumer ecosystem, and invest in early transformational “ideas” and start-ups. These innovation centers act as a first touch-point to the market and competitive developments. 

How does Johnson & Johnson lead the way in effectively managing alliances and establishing trust and stability in partnerships for maximum profitability? 

Maximizing profitability is not per se the main motivation for our partnerships. In many instances, co-creating innovative solutions is the main objective of our partnerships. We have dedicated alliance managers in place who manage the partnerships typically from inception until integration into our business. On top of that, we typically develop a network of multi-level relationships with our partners to strengthen the ties and understanding between Johnson & Johnson and our partners. One of our ambitions is to become the partner of choice, which implies that we value trust, openness, and win-win.

Tags:  allainces  alliance strategy  John Bell PhD  Johnson & Johnson Consumer  medical devices  partnerships  pharmaceutical  Philips  PwC  R&D  start-ups  University of Tilburg 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

ASAP Announces Alliance Excellence Awards Finalists Slated to Take Center Stage at the 2016 ASAP Global Alliance Summit

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Monday, February 8, 2016

At this year’s much-anticipated ASAP Alliance Excellence Awards, some of the world’s most partnering-savvy companies are vying for center-stage recognition of their exceptional performance in the world of alliance management. Officially announced this week in an ASAP press release, the three categories of awards will be presented March 1 at the 2016 Global Alliance Summit, “Partnering Everywhere: Expert Leadership for the Ecosystem,” March 1–4 at the Gaylord National Resort & Convention Center, National Harbor, Maryland, USA. 

The finalists for the Individual Alliance Excellence Award are: AbbVie-Genentech Roche, Cisco-Dimension Data, International SOS-Control Risks, and Panduit-General Cable. One of two candidates will receive the Innovative Best Alliance Practice Award: National Instruments or Takeda Russia. There are three contenders vying for the Alliance Program Excellence Award: Bayer, Huawei Technologies, and National Instruments. 

“The Alliance Excellence Awards highlight the best and brightest in partnering and alliance management. The significance of these awards cannot be underestimated,” remarked Mike Leonetti, president and CEO of ASAP, in last week’s press release. “These awards are ‘proof in the pudding’ that effective leadership, a strong alliance management function, and sophisticated partnering practices pay off in successful, healthy alliances. The awards highlight the efforts, achievements, and innovations that improve strategy and productivity of partnering programs, with benefits to partnering companies’ bottom lines as well as to society in general. These finalists were selected because they have proven their worth as leaders in the field of alliance management.” 

The awards are presented to companies that excel in:

  • Leading, planning, and implementation with compelling and measurable results
  • The use of new, individual alliance management tools or processes that have an immediate and powerful impact on the organization and/or discipline of alliance management
  • Implementation and management of alliance portfolios that demonstrate consistent success, persistence in overcoming obstacles, and creative and/or efficient use of tools, professional development/certification, processes, and other elements
  • Creativity and out-of –the-box thinking that has evolved the art and science of alliance management

 For more information about the finalists and their achievements, read the full announcement on PR Web newswire at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2016/02/prweb13196184.htm

Tags:  AbbVie-Genentech Roche  alliance management  alliance portfolios  ASAP Alliance Excellence Awards  Bayer  Cisco-Dimension Data  Huawei Technologies  implementation  innovation  International SOS-Control Risks  National Instruments  Panduit-General Cable  partnering  Takeda Russia 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

How to Manage Mega-scale Partnering in the Era of the Internet of Things from the Vantage Point of Schneider Electric

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Thursday, January 28, 2016

When it comes to Schneider Electric, the company operates in a seemingly unlimited world of opportunities for establishing connections. Its partnering mantra seems to be “think globally and act locally, globally, and everywhere in between.” 

Now add the Internet of Things, and Schneider is broadening its scope to partner in complex and creative ways with some of the biggest companies in the world, such as Cisco Systems, Microsoft, and IBM Corporation. That’s the topic Anthony DeSpirito, CSAP, managing director, strategic accounts at Schneider Electric, is scheduled to address during the panel discussion “Capturing the Value of the Internet of Things” March 1–4, 2016, at the ASAP Global Alliance Summit “Partnering Everywhere: Expert Leadership for the Ecosystem,” at the Gaylord National Resort & Convention Center, National Harbor, Maryland, USA. The discussion will focus on generating revenue from the complex partnering and business models driven by IoT. Other participants scheduled for the panel discussion are Nancy M. Green, global practice lead, healthcare strategy & thought leadership, at Verizon  Enterprise Solutions and Joan Meltzer, CSAP, smarter cities go-to-market leader at IBM Analytics, IBM Corporation. 

Schneider currently manages more than $30 billion in energy for 4,500 clients in 147 countries. The company integrates solutions in large numbers of physical structures, such as electrical and SCADA systems (data acquisitions and control systems for power or water treatment systems), and has access to vast amounts of data about the physical environment. The information is then provided to an analytics platform that turns physical data into information that allows partners, such as Verizon and IBM, to make better-informed decisions. 

Such complex, mega-scale strategic alliances require large teams and significant investments of time for planning. Schneider has 14 alliance managers. Key components need to fall into place for mega-partnership to fly: “Alignment is absolutely critical at the executive level,” DeSpirito pointed out during a recent interview.

 

For example, Schneider’s alliance with IBM to provide cutting-edge cloud services for the utility industries required the fundamental first step of having problem-solving meetings at the executive vice president level. “Once they agreed, it … cascaded throughout the organizations. Now the sales areas have agreement, and there is a cadence of communications between the two teams doing workshops and basic education. Now we need to bring discipline and cadence through quarterly business reviews,” he explained.

 

The early-stage, innovative ADMS cloud-based service solution could radically change the utility industry if it gains regulatory approval because it could provide services to utilities that can’t afford ADMS as a stand-alone product. Electrical power plants use a distribution management software system called DMS that allows them to be efficient in production and distribution. Schneider’s system is ADMS, where “A” stands for Advanced. The system is “much more customizable, much more efficient, and allows a utility to become more productive,” he says. If a proof of concept with ADMS that is underway in Canada is successful, “we anticipate it will move into production, … which should manifest itself in lower operation costs, cheaper electric, and allow us to go to smaller utilities,” he explained.

 

From a partnering standpoint, this is a brand new business model, and also an example of the complex alliance management planning often required in large company alliances, DeSpirito added. “This is not just buying and selling software and space in a data center.”

Tags:  ADMS  alliance management  alliances  Cisco Systems  cloud  DMS  electrical and SCADA systems  IBM Corporation  IoT  Joan Meltzer  Microsoft  Nancy M. Green  Schneider Electric  Tony DeSpirito  utilities  utility industry  Verizon Enterprise Solutions 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 
Page 51 of 93
 |<   <<   <  46  |  47  |  48  |  49  |  50  |  51  |  52  |  53  |  54  |  55  |  56  >   >>   >| 
For more information email us at info@strategic-alliances.org or call +1-781-562-1630