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ASAP’s New “Quick Takes” Explore Impact of IoT and Ecosystem Partnering—and Proves to Be a Highly Successful Format for Engaging 2016 Summit Participants

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson & John DeWitt, Friday, March 18, 2016

Some forms of communication are more effective than others. The “TED Talks” speaking format, for example, has drawn significant numbers of interested viewers for over 30 years. That is why ASAP decided to introduce its new “ASAP Quick Takes,” patterned after the “TED Talks,” unveiling them for the first time at the 2015 ASAP Biopharma Conference, and again, at the 2016 ASAP Global Alliance Summit. 

The talks were a big hit and garnered lots of positive feedback. Such short talks are successful for several reasons: The message is sometimes simple, imaginative, and an easy take-away; the time limit of about 20 minutes forces speakers to distill the main points, which more-readily captivates the audience. 

Take, for example, John Bell’s “Quick Takes” talk where the marketing executive for strategy development at Johnson & Johnson Consumer Health advised a collaborative approach: “Play in the sandbox. We are sitting on massive scale of opportunity to work in open innovation,” he said. “The toys must be shared. You can’t have it all your way, and you must behave yourself,” he added, while outlining the rules for success in today’s partnering environment. “Today, it’s a whole playground! Amusement parks, even. You can do many things [with] so many kids to play with. Which one would you choose, and why would they play with you?” he asked provocatively, prompting the audience to join him in the creative box for 20 minutes. 

Bell’s invitation was a terrific precursor to the talk by Larry Walsh, CEO of The 2112 Group and a well-known journalist, who asked the audience to join him in a virtual chess game. Strategy is a key component of success, he said. “Strategy is about making choices. If you fail to make choices, you often put yourself at risk,” he continued. “Lots of businesses say they make choices, but they are consumed by revenue generation and don’t discriminate between good and bad decisions. They also fail to anticipate. This is where surveying the landscape equates with chess. If you don’t survey the landscape and understand your competition, you cannot anticipate what the opposition will do,” he noted. Among other things, “you need to lay traps and position assets to create advantages.” 

Think ahead and read the board, he advised. Not only what you are going to do, but what your opponent is going to do. Chess helps you to play by the rules and take responsibility for your actionsto problem-solve in an uncertain environment.” 

Another “Quick Talks” speaker, Anne Nelson of IBM Watson, threw out an elaborate blueprint for success for IoT multi-partnering. IBM’s new business unit, formed in 2014, has seen astronomical growthsome 500 new partners in just two years. The IBM Watson Group provides over 30 services that partners can write applications against or leverage to improve applications. “What did you tweet over the last two weeks?” she asked the audience to recall. “Watson can provide personality insights from those tweets” and generate different coupons for discounts depending on that profile. “We are opening the platform to partners on data as well,” she replied. ‘This platform is the only one in the industry today with this many apps.” 

What’s the value for partners in alliances with IBM in the Watson ecosystem? “We’re the number one B2B brand, Watson has 70 percent unaided awareness—so brand is going gangbusters in terms of value to partners,” said Nelson, who was recruited to IBM Watson Group from IBM’s direct sales organization in January of 2015. “We have over 40,000 IBM sellers who touch millions of accounts,” she noted. 

For a longer-term view of success, Marcus Wilson, president and co-founder of Anthem’s real-world research subsidiary, HealthCore, Inc., spoke about his 20-plus years building healthcare partnerships. The key component is building trust, he said. His experience included pioneered the emergence of physician and patient education and clinical decision support services based upon real-world data. Wilson’s experience exemplifies the “kind of creativity and entrepreneur skill increasingly required when we are reinventing what we are doing all the time,” said Jan Twombly, CSAP, ASAP chairman of programming, and president of The Rhythm of Business, who prefaced the talks as moderator. 

As an entrepreneur and “intrapreneur,” Wilson shared several formative personal experiences, starting as a young clinical pharmacist doing his residency at a Blue Cross/Blue Shield of Delaware health center. “Influence is everything,” Wilson emphasized. “I had no power to prescribeI would have to walk into physicians’ offices and convince them that it was their idea to treat the way they should. I had to influence the healthcare center to offer all these new services—which eventually became incredible force for us.” Similarly, he said, “We met with FDA 10 years ago about real-world evidence. They said, that’s great, but this stuff is voodoo science.” Thanks to influence—reinforced by lots of data—“it’s becoming much more mainstream today.” 

You can read individual blog posts about these “Quick Takes” talks on our website at http://www.strategic-alliances.org/blogpost/1143942/ASAP-Blog.

Tags:  alliances  Ann Nelson  ASAP Quick Takes  assets  B2B brand  collaborative  healthcare partnerships  Heathcore Inc.  IBM Watson  IoT  John Bell  Johnson & Johnson Consumer Health  Larry Walsh  Marcus Wilson  multi-partnering  open innovation  partnering environment  problem solve  strategy  TED Talks  The 2112 Group 

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Engaging Peer-to-Peer Roundtable Sessions Become Popular New Central Feature at ASAP Global Alliance Summit

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson & Ana Brown, Monday, March 14, 2016

Fostering opportunities and tools for peer-to-peer learning is one of ASAP’s goals, and that concept was well-integrated into this year’s ASAP Global Alliance Summit with several popular roundtable sessions. The feedback has been positive so far on the two roundtables, which quickly became an active format for sharing at the Gaylord National Resort & Convention Center, National Harbor, Md. 

Following the “ASAP Quick Takes” talks, the first roundtable session provided participants with the choice of 17 valuable, timely topics connected to the broader “ASAP Quick Takes” theme of “Partnering Everywhere: Expert Leadership for the Ecosystem.” Participants chose between 26 different discussion groups facilitated by thought leaders from ASAP’s membership. Topics ranged from “Strategic Alliance Management across the Enterprise” to “Knowing with Whom to Partner Now” to “Quick Take ‘Hot Takes:’ Seeing Around Corners.” Look for an upcoming blog item on the second engaging roundtable session that took place the following day: “Alliances around the World: Cultural Roundtables,” facilitated by Philip Sack, CSAP, ASAP Asia Collaborative Business Community, and co-presented by Guarino Gentil Jr., CA-AM, Merck-Serono; Subhojit Roye, CSAP, Tradeshift; Andrew Yeomans, CSAP, Merck-Serono. 

I randomly selected a group at the ASAP Quick Take Roundtables led by Donna Peek, CSAP, director, partner enablement & operations, global alliances & channels, SAS on “The First 100 Days of an Alliance” and watched a lively, relevant conversation unfold. Peek, who also is ASAP’s vice-chairman of the executive management board, dynamically led the group, drawing out ideas and fostering engaging conversation as the participants ramped up their communications into active sharing. “The train is already barreling down the track and you are trying to adjust and redefine,” she said, while jotting down a checklist of what an alliance manager should be focused on in the first 100 days that looked something like this: 

  • Identify critical stakeholders
  • Identify executive governance
  • Define frameworks
  • Find good fits for the collaborative team
  • Make sure everything is included that needs to be in the contract
  • Clarify strategy and scope
  • Make alignment part of the term sheet process 

This last point, offered by Ana Brown, project manager, strategic alliances, Citrix, so captured participant attention that we thought her idea worth sharing as an example of how helpful and practical these exchanges can be. Brown offered to write up the idea for a larger audience. 

#Termsheetlove: Bringing Back the Term Sheet
By Ana Brown

The use of a term sheet has been a longstanding precursor to any agreement. With busy times, and changing alliance leaders and teams, sometimes such processes are left behind.

If you find yourself having multiple conversations with your internal stakeholders, all at different times, redlining your partner agreement—sometimes for months. Finding yourself thinking, “Oh my gosh, that call was so long ago I can’t remember what the issues with the agreement were in the first place,” then this recommendation is for you.

Bringing back the term sheet with some easy steps will help you: 

  1. Gain alignment with all your internal stakeholders before going into the agreement process.
  2. Cut the lead-time to fully executed agreement more than half (months for some of us)! 

First, work with your legal team to come up with the best term sheet template (and get buy in from your internal stakeholders that the term sheet will answer most, if not all, of the questions they may have on any potential partner agreement).

Next, complete the term sheet after completing your business plan and receiving buy in from your business unit and partner. Alliance leaders fill out the term sheet (deal exec summary and details) and simultaneously circulate it to the internal stakeholders so that they all know.... (Example of stakeholders include: channel operations, revenue recognition, legal, GEO VPs, etc.—anyone who needs to know the deal is coming.)


Alliance leaders then schedule a kickoff call with stakeholders to review the term sheet, receive stakeholders’ approval to the term sheet (email approval is okay), and are then ready to move the deal to agreement and work with legal to execute.

Ta-da! You just made a bunch of friends by creating internal alignment and cutting the lead time to fully executed agreement in half.

#Termsheetlove - spread it forward :)

Tags:  agreement  alignment  Ana Brown  Andrew Yeomans  ASAP Global Alliance Summit  ASAP Quick Takes  collaborative  Donna Peek  frameworks  governance  Guarino Gentil  leadership  Merck-Serono  partnering  peer-to-peer learning  Philip Sack  scope  stakeholders  strategy  Subhojit Roye  term sheet  Tradeshift 

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Biopharma Alliance Management in the Ecosystem Era: Three Leaders Offer Quick ‘Doses’ of Advice Followed by Deeper Dive ‘Treatments’ for Staying Abreast of Change in the Field

Posted By Cynthia Hanson, Thursday, September 10, 2015

ASAP presented three plenary sessions Thursday morning, Sept. 10, in an engaging new 20-minute topic overview, “ASAP Quick Takes,” designed after the “TED Talks” format as part of the 2015 ASAP BioPharma Conference. The second half of the morning was devoted to “Deeper Dive” sessions with more in-depth plenary presentations and peer exchanges in roundtable discussions focused on particular topics. The three talks were moderated by Jan Twombly, CSAP and president of The Rhythm of Business, Inc. Organized around the theme of “Alliance Expertise at the Forefront: Leadership for the Ecosystem,” the conference kicked off Wed., Sept. 9 at the Revere Hotel in Boston, Mass., USA.

 

First at the podium was Heather Fraser, global life sciences and healthcare lead at IBM’s Institute for Business Value, who discussed “Redefining Partnering in the Healthcare and Life Sciences Ecosystem.” Recent developments and findings have prompted a major shift from the traditional one-to-one partnering model to partnering within the ecosystem. The disruption has impacted not only the traditional pharma and biotech players in the healthcare and life sciences industries, but also less-traditional, sometimes surprising players, such as judicial (law enforcement and the courts), consumer electronics, and the automotive industry, among others. Technology is a major catalyst. While it has forced greater connectivity and openness, it has also resulted in greater complexity in partnering, Fraser said. The new dynamics beg the question “How do I find and connect with the right partners in new and unfamiliar industries and how do I make the connections?”

 

Next on the floor was Cindy Warren, vice president of alliance management at Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson, with her talk on “Alliance Leadership for the Healthcare Ecosystem.” Partnering used to be simple, she said as she presented a slide from the old television show “The Dating Game,” where you asked three questions, and the answers resulted in a clear choice, she said.  The old model of “sharing a soda, talking, and shaking hands” to forge the deal no longer holds up in a business environment impacted by technology and greater complexity. We’re in a new era that requires a partnering approach more akin to “speed dating,” Warren explained—and if you don’t move fast enough, you might not secure the partnership. “Our leaders need to become more agile, more flexible. It’s not just about taking that agreement and executing it, but making sure partners are aligned. It’s about working with it, shaping that collaboration, not just about delivering value, but creating value,” she explained.

 

The final plenary session highlighted patient advocacy while exploring the industry-focused partnering activities of the Alzheimer’s Association. It takes a village to support an Alzheimer patient and his or her caregivers, as emphasized in “Supporting Patients and Families at the Center of the Ecosystem,” presented by Lenore Jackson-Pope, BSN, MSM, CCRP, manager of medical and research education for the association’s Massachusetts/New Hampshire Chapter. The number of Alzheimer’s patients has increased astronomically in the past 15 years, and “the country will be bankrupted if we don’t find solution,” she warned. Through its partnering and advocacy, this patient advocacy organization aims to rapidly address the 3 C’s of the disease—care, cure, and cause—during a time when financial support from the National Institutes of Health is marginal compared to its financial support for cancer, HIV, and other serious diseases. Consequently, the Alzheimer’s Association—which Jackson-Pope described as the world’s largest nonprofit funder of research—has created an extensive network of supporters and partnerships to address the problem.

 

Diving Deeper: What Does It Take to Be an ‘Ecosystem Warrior’?

While fundamentals (such as anticipating and managing risk) often remain important, the role of alliance management changes considerably in the ecosystem, IBM’s Fraser emphasized in her “Deeper Dive” follow-on session.

 

“Thinking back to your roles, the ability to partner beyond current borders requires understanding of new and emerging industries, different regulatory environments, speed to market, and the continuum of health, wellness, and care,” she explained. “You also have to have the stamina to stand up, be counted, and explain why different ideas may work for creating value for your organization moving forward.”

 

This type thinking (and stamina) are required of what she called “successful ecosystem warriors.” Key capabilities including “having that ability to act with speed, but at different speeds in different industries and ecosystems, really being the hunter that goes out and looks at those new and different networks, being the person that’s prepared to be disruptive, and understanding what role your organization needs to take in that ecosystem.”

 

Fraser left the audience with several key questions to consider: 

  • What role does your organization plan to play in the ecosystem?
  • Do you have the skills and capabilities to work in that converged ecosystem?Can you address the cultural aspect—“really getting under the skin of the culture of players you’re going to work with”?

Tags:  Alzheimer’s Association  ASAP Quick Takes  Cindy Warren  ecosystem  Heather Fraser  IBM’s Institute for Business Value  Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies  Lenore Jackson-Pope  partnering  patient advocacy  TED Talks 

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