My Profile   |   Print Page   |   Contact Us   |   Sign In   |   Register
ASAP Blog
Blog Home All Blogs
Welcome to ASAP Blog, the best place to stay current regarding upcoming events, member companies, the latest trends, and leaders in the industry. Blogs are posted at least once a week; members may subscribe to receive notifications when new blogs are posted by clicking the "Subscribe" link above.

 

Search all posts for:   

 

Top tags: alliance management  alliances  collaboration  partnering  alliance  partner  partners  alliance managers  partnerships  ecosystem  alliance manager  The Rhythm of Business  partnership  Jan Twombly  biopharma  Vantage Partners  Eli Lilly and Company  governance  Strategic Alliance Magazine  IBM  IoT  strategy  ASAP BioPharma Conference  cloud  healthcare  innovation  Microsoft  NetApp  strategic alliances  2015 ASAP Global Alliance Summit 

ASAP Announces 2018 Alliance Excellence Awards Finalists—and the List Is Worth a View

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Monday, January 29, 2018

ASAP officially announced (see http://www.prweb.com/releases/2018/01/prweb15131526.htm) this year’s finalists for the annual ASAP Global Alliance Excellence Awards, and the contributions of companies on the list are substantial—from unusual alliance key performance indicators (KPIs), to programs for crisis management, to collaborations to create social good, to consolidation of alliance data that provides visibility across the organization. The list goes on and on.

Nine candidates will vie for awards in four different categories: Alliance for Corporate Social Responsibility; Alliance Program Excellence; Individual Alliance Excellence; Innovative Best Alliance Practice. Winners will be announced March 27 during an end-of-day awards ceremony at the 2018 ASAP Global Alliance Summit, “Propelling Partnering for the On-Demand World: New Perspectives + Proven Practices for Collaborative Business,” to be held March 26-28 in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, USA.

The 2018 awards finalists that were singled out for their exceptional leadership and contributions are:

Amgen for a biopharma alliance program recognized for being founded on the three pillars of building a strong foundation with clear roles and alignment of strategic objectives and value drivers through a partnership; ensuring best practice execution on every alliance through an alliance kickoff and playbook; optimizing oversight of Amgen’s alliance portfolio.

Cisco-Dimension Data for their 25-year celebration of alliance success, a milestone that prompted them to kick off 25 projects focused on creating social good, ultimately resulting in a record year for the partnership.

Dassault Systèmes for putting together an effective social video marketing campaign to build awareness and spark interest among customers. The extent to which Dassault has embedded social video marketing into its partner program and scaled it across its technology alliance community is unusual, innovative, and engaging.

JDA for re-architecting its partner program in response to new market opportunities and a shift in customer demand for solutions in the cloud. The Partner Advantage Program launched in April 2017, employing many best practices of modern partner ecosystems.

Medimmune for an alliance information management system and dashboard reporting tools that enable widespread visibility of alliance performance in near-real time, including consolidation of alliance data that provides visibility across the organization.

Merck KGaA for collecting and managing some unusual alliance KPIs for value creation, risk mitigation, and problem solving, resulting in multiple improvements on several levels.

MSD–Julphar for forming the DUNES alliance to serve seven therapeutic areas for six countries in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region, a problematic area of the world for business development. Through the introduction of alliance management tools, processes, and training, the companies created sustainable businesses.

Pierre Fabre for successfully deploying SharePoint Alliance Management, which unifies how alliances are managed by providing common alliance management tools to more than 400 people; implementing tools that can be shared with partners; facilitating onboarding of new team members.

Shire for introducing a new best practice for partner crisis management, a unique approach for managing stakeholders through a crisis situation. Originally developed to help navigate a merger, it has since been tested and validated across several crisis situations.

2018 ASAP Alliance Excellence Awards finalists will be honored—and the winners announced—at the 2018 ASAP Global Alliance Summit, “Propelling Partnering for the On-Demand World: New Perspectives + Proven Practices for Collaborative Business,” to be held March 26-28 in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, USA. Learn more and register to attend at http://asapsummit.org/.  Read ASAP’s January 25, 2018 official announcement at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2018/01/prweb15131526.htm

Tags:  2018 ASAP Alliance Excellence Awards Finalists  alliance  alliance data  best practices  Cisco-Dimension Data  collaborations  crisis management  Dassault Systèmes  JDA  Medimmune  Merck KGaA  MSD–Julphar  Pierre Fabre  SharePoint Alliance Management  Shire  social good 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

‘Collaboration Is Not a Natural Phenomenon’: Mapping a TE-AM Road to Successful Alliances, Part Two

Posted By Genevieve Fraser, Thursday, September 14, 2017

“Study after study has shown that collaboration is not a natural phenomenon. It’s more normal to be competitive or to work within your team (tribe),” according to Lynda McDermott, (CA-AM), president of EquiPro International, Ltd., an international management consulting firm which specializes in leadership, team and business development for the Fortune 500, midsized companies, and professional services firms. McDermott made this assertion during her pre-conference workshop, “Next Gen Alliance Management: Moving your Organization to Ecosystem Performance Excellence,” one of the sessions on opening day of the 2017 ASAP BioPharma Conference, “Accelerating Life Science Collaboration: Better Partnering, Better Outcomes,” held September 13-15 in Cambridge, Mass. USA. (See Part One of ASAP Media’s two-part blog coverage of the workshop, a highly abbreviated version of the customized all-day ASAP TE-AM Training course McDermott offers to alliance professionals.)

 

The purpose of the all-day workshop McDermott teaches is to make alliances future proof. Based on exhaustive research, the ASAP TE-AM Training is designed to help put that structure in place so that teams that undergo the training can become a preferred alliance partner. The question is, how do we get from a non-collaborative group to one that effectively functions as a team and actively collaborates with partners?

 

McDermott took a head count of how many attendees considered themselves to be alliance professionals, regardless of their title. Most in the room raised their hand, except for one man who is involved in creating a start-up. She then asked, as alliance professionals, what skills or knowledge do they need? The responses ranged from the ability to communicate, having an awareness of resources, and seeing the overall picture, to understanding their roles and learning “what can be shared and what can’t, and when to share.”  

 

Even if people are not in an official role, they need to be on board with creating and sustaining an alliance, McDermott asserted. They need to know what the best practices are as well as which skills are needed.  But even after acquiring the needed skills, rarely might individuals be truthfully assessed as being part of a partnership, even an informal one. Partners need to do more than exchange business cards and talk on the phone periodically. For many, despite their training, nothing further happens because their training was geared toward individuals and a development of their unique skills. It is not targeted to acquiring group skills with a team that can then move on to build an effective alliance.

To address this oversight, ASAP applied mapping to figure out which techniques might work and which might not.  The result was an approach to creating better alliance teams—an approach intended to be customized to individual organizations.

 

The mapping involves the creation of three benchmark assessments with corresponding questions. The questions are grouped around a Framework assessment, Team Dynamics assessment and a Lean and Agile assessment. Based on responses to the questions, teams can assess what works and where they were most weak. Following the assessments, a road map can be based on areas that need the most development. This roadmap is a work plan that requires team action—which requires achieving a buy-in specific to that team.

“It’s important to get them on the same page,” McDermott explained. “The point is to teach people collaborate skills that involve skill-building exercises and debriefings. Sometimes, these assessments need to be refreshed every six months or so to keep the team on track,” she added.

 

“It’s also important to build a network that respects differences. There will always be cultural differences. The dynamic of adversarial conflict vs. building trust is always present. If a team isn’t having conflict, they will not be able to effectively organize,” she cautioned. (Be sure to read the Q3 2017 Strategic Alliance Magazine’s in-depth coverage of the topic of conflict management—which includes insights from McDermott and other experts on how to use creative conflict to advantage.) “Ask, how can we work together? The degree to which this can be accomplished improves the efficiency of an alliance, despite conflict. Truthfully, there will always be conflict, but you learn to manage it.”

 

Additional words of advice McDermott offered include:

  • Never believe that people naturally behave collaboratively.
  • Remember, you are not a therapist but a facilitator.
  • You must talk at deep level when something’s not right—for instance, there may be power issues, gender issues, etc.

Finally, McDermott noted, the TE-AM workshop is fast. It helps to focus on the strategic side of alliance management. It provides a process to uncover the gaps. “It allows the group to discover the group,” she said.

Tags:  alliance  alliance manager  Framework assessment  Lean and Agile  Lynda McDermott  partner  Strategic Alliance Magazine  Team Dynamics assessment  TE-AM Training  training 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

ASAP Summit Spotlight Leadership Forum Highlights Exceptional Contributions: Part 1—Inspiring a Movement for Change Within Your Company

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Every day, alliance managers work diligently to advance concepts, innovations, or products for the marketplace: self-driving cars to reduce road hazards and deaths; new drugs to promote healing and lessen suffering; technological breakthroughs to minimize energy use and reduce global warming. ASAP believes these managers deserve to be highlighted for their remarkable accomplishments, which is why the association held a Summit Spotlight Leadership Forum Q&A Panel session last March at the 2017 ASAP Global Alliance Summit “Profit, Innovation, and Value for the Part­nering Enterprise,” Feb. 28-March 2, held in San Diego, San Diego, Calif. The session was moderated by John W. DeWitt, CEO of JW DeWitt Business Communications and publisher and editor of ASAP Media and Strategic Alliance Magazine. Highlighted on the podium for their exceptional company contributions were Celine Schillinger of Sanofi Pasteur; Chris Haskell of Bayer; Maria Olson of NetApp; and Kevin Hickey of BeyondTrust. In Part 1 of this three part series, DeWitt directs the first question to Schillinger, who spearheaded a movement at Sanofi Pasteur that led to cultural changes and a progressive alliance with The Synergist. The win-win partnership also led to receipt of the ASAP Alliances for Social Responsibility Alliance Excellence Award for “Break Dengue.”

Celine, how did you get the inspiration to drive a people’s movement within your company?

Celine: It started with feelings we often don’t talk about in the workplace, such as anger and frustration. That can serve as an impulse to push you to the next level. It can serve to push and challenge the status quo. The first people’s movement started by chance—it was to foster diversity. I had such wonderful talented people around me, and that lack of diversity was affecting the people and the company itself. I thought, “I have got to do something, even if it’s just a small step. If I just complain, it will not go anywhere.” I realized I catalyzed something that no one was addressing. It came as a big surprise—I never thought something like that would happen. It changed my life and career, and I am very grateful for the company that enabled me to do that. It wasn’t easy for them or for me. I know I’ve been a pain in the neck—sometimes we are human, we don’t like to change things that seem to be working. But it’s our role to push and to trigger change. If we don’t do it, no one will do it.

How did you get executive buy in?

Celine: It doesn’t happen overnight, for sure. You have got to focus on your purpose and the ways to reach your purpose. When you start, you don’t have a budget or department, but connections have a value. Look where there are pockets of energy, and have deep conversations about your purpose. If you have deep connections that build up, you become a force. Mastering communications in your marketing will make you unavoidable to leadership. We also did things under the radar. Seek validation. Build connections. The company then will begin to see you as an opportunity. The first reaction was mockery about our being a feminist group. But when we got an award for the company, and then another, they realized we were an opportunity for them to shine. We said: “Welcome. We will be much stronger with you.” And don’t forget to work on yourself.  Be inclusive, be inclusive all the time.

Chris: Your point about having a vision [is valuable]—you can then tailor it to your customer. The [vision] incubator is also a response to frustration. In our case, we went from project manager to partnering. It was so frustrating because the home office couldn’t see the value. We tried to show them that this [vision] they didn’t act on can become valuable. That’s exactly what they don’t want to hear. So you need to create a model with autonomy and control. Create buy in for management in this case so they can see the long-term vision. A CEO at the time gave official buy in. He said, “I don’t know what will come of this. Just don’t hurt the little companies.” I will close with the fact that we had a value proposal that was a four-year plan that highlighted to the community that didn’t know us that we were of value. What we found is that the opposition eventually came back with opportunities to expand this.

Maria: You have to be connected and passionate for your cause. Executives need to know how you believe. Then you have to show them how to get there. That’s when they get confident. If you really want to do a big partnership or alliance, you need to believe in it because, if you don’t, no one else will.

ASAP Media’s coverage of the Summit Spotlight Leadership Forum Q&A continues in Part 2. 

Tags:  alliance  alliance managers  Bayer  Celine Schillinger  Chris Haskell  communications  Maria Olson  NetApp  partnering  partnership  Sanofi Pasteur  win-win partnerships 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Academia and Industry Partnerships—Creating a Seamless Fit (Part I)

Posted By Genevieve Fraser, Friday, June 2, 2017

Though their organizations are quite different, the shared goal partners in an academia-industry life sciences alliance is to find a cure to address the disease, emphasized Mark Coflin, CSAP, an oncologist and head of alliance management at Shire Pharmaceutical, during a candid, rapid-fire discussion on the cultural differences between academia and industry. Coflin kicked off a session featuring several panelists  discussing “Making the Most of Industry-Academia Collaborations” during thePartnering for Performance in Life Sciences” track at the 2017 ASAP Global Alliance Summit, “Profit, Innovation, and Value for the Part­nering Enterprise,” Feb. 28-March 2 in San Diego, Calif.

 

Joining Coflin on the panel was Paula Norris, PhD, laboratory director and project manager at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP); Sarah Hudson, PhD, a biochemist, organic chemist, and associate director of R&D projects and operations at SBP; Joe Sypek, PhD, director and external science lead, comparative immunology at Shire Pharmaceuticals. The pharmaceutical company is dedicated to creating specialized medicines for patients with rare diseases.

 

Coflin opened the discussion with a major consideration for this kind of partnership: “From the science side, when you’re handed a project, if you haven’t been involved from the beginning, it’s difficult,” he offered. “Having someone on the alliance side helps a lot.”  Coflin said he has managed some one-off projects, but for the most part, his target institutions are involved with pediatric research where he is responsible for putting agreements together.

 

Sypek’s role at Shire is to identify and foster new academic alliance partnerships. This complex of new partnerships, in turn, feeds the early-discovery stage pipeline in the rare disease space within discovery biology and transitional research.  Shire’s milestone-based agreements are tied to contingent payments for each gene target if specified research, regulatory, clinical development, commercialization, and sales milestone events occur.

 

“We’ve tried other models,” Sypek said. “Each institution has nuances. Each has upfront money and needs money to start up. So, we start with initial payments and set the budget, year to year.”

 

“We do milestones because we need to get meaningful data.  We want data that is robust and statistically significant. If it doesn’t work out, the principle investigator (PI) can take the project and partner with someone else,” Sypek continued. “Treatments are an internal project that require regular lab meetings. Both parties must be committed to getting to goals, but all projects have regular meetings where we try to pour all necessary resources together for success.”

 

When setting up a team, if it doesn’t have a molecule, Shire might outsource and pay for its development, even if it’s outside of the budget.  In 2012, Shire entered a broad, three-year research collaboration in rare diseases with Boston Children’s Hospital, and since then has expanded to other pediatric hospitals. 

 

“Shire’s plan is to cast a broad net to get the best of the best to target the disease. That’s what the intentions are, but what are the challenges?” Sypek asked.

 

“Central to the challenges are the cultural differences between academia and industry. But the goal for both parties is to find a cure to address the disease,” Sypek concluded. “You can work for years in a lab, but it’s the research collaboration that allows a breakthrough [to be] possible. Today, academia seeks out industry partners. The boundary walls are not as high as they use to be. They are more in tune to working with industry. NIH budgets can be tight, and there are always questions about what might happen to funding. That’s where industry might be able to step in and fund research and materials.”

Part II of this blog post focuses on Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute’s perspective on academic-industry partnerships. 

Tags:  academia  alliance  Boston Children’s Hospital  collaboration  Joe Sypek  partner  Paula Norris  pediatric research  research  Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute  Sarah Hudson  Shire Pharmaceuticals 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

New ASAP Corporate Member, DSM, Evolved From Coal Mining to Science-Based Company with Innovation, Sustainability, and Partnering at its Core

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Friday, March 17, 2017

 DSM is a global science-based company with a focus on health, nutrition, and materials. Headquartered in the Netherlands, it has undergone a vast transformation from a coal mining entity in the early 20th century to a diverse, innovative company with the core value of sustainably. Partnering via strategic alliances and joint ventures has been critical to DSM’s growth, says Anoop Nathwani, director of excellence in strategic alliances/joint Ventures at DSM’s Innovation Centre. Nathwani provided the following information about DSM.

What inspired your team to join ASAP at the corporate level?
DSM has a number of successful joint ventures and strategic alliances, such as with Novozymes and Syngenta, to name a few. Industry dynamics are changing, and it recognizes the need to partner more extensively and start to ensure that correct partnering capabilities, skills, and competencies are more widely and consistently used to ensure partner successful in developing new, groundbreaking solutions for the markets it serves. In order to achieve this excellence in alliances and partnerships, DSM is looking to learn from ASAP’s best practices and adopt the appropriate tools and skills that are proven with companies showing consistent alliance success. DSM also saw the opportunity to be able to “tap into” thought leaders and networks with like-minded individuals to share best practices and learn from failures from a community of alliance professionals.

How else do you anticipate ASAP benefitting you and your team?

By joining ASAP, we can leverage the resources, tools, frameworks, and knowledge base with real, hands-on case studies of successful alliances that ASAP and the member community can offer. This can help those involved in driving strategic alliances, JVs, and partnerships to consistently achieve success in their partnering activity, versus the high failure rates that we see happening in partnering in general. The ultimate benefit is to see DSM achieve its growth objectives through successful partnering.

How has DSM evolved during a critical time of change in tech?
The evolution is simply phenomenal. Rather than trying to paraphrase this, please view this link to the company Website that explains that evolutional growth: 
https://www.dsm.com/corporate/about/our-company/dsm-history.html The link also talks about some of our many partnerships. Our alliance with Novozymes is a feed enzymes alliance. Combining DSM's and Novozymes' vast resources provides access to innovative products that are setting new industry standards and reaping exciting business results: http://www.dsm.com/markets/anh/en_US/products/products-feedenzymes/products_feed_enzymes_alliance.html. In terms of the alliance with Syngenta, DSM and Syngenta are developing and commercializing biological solutions for agriculture.  The alliance recently announced an R&D partnership to develop microbial-based agricultural solutions, including bio-controls, bio-pesticides and bio-stimulants. The companies aim to jointly commercialize solutions from their discovery platform. The collaboration aims to accelerate the delivery of a broad spectrum of products based on naturally occurring microorganisms for pre- and post-harvest applications around the world. These organisms can protect crops from pests and diseases, combat resistance, and enhance plant productivity and fertility.

Tags:  alliance  alliance teams  collaboration  DSM  Innovation  joint ventures  Novozymes  Partnering  resources  Sustainability  Syngenta  tools 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 
Page 5 of 8
1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6  |  7  |  8
For more information email us at info@strategic-alliances.org or call +1-781-562-1630