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Overcoming the Curve of Conviction: How to Increase Value by Getting from Negotiation to Collaboration

Posted By Cynthia Hanson, Friday, September 11, 2015

“To Collaborate or Not To Collaborate?” That is the question Mike Berglund, CA-AM, alliance director at Eli Lilly and Company, asked the audience at the 2015 ASAP BioPharma Conference held Sept. 9-11 at the Revere Hotel off the Boston Common.  “Are We Negotiating or Collaborating? Increasing Alliance Value through Collaborative Decision Making” was the topic on stage as Berglund prompted the audience to consider three case scenarios that presented alliance management challenges when working with partners.

 

Decision-making roles are complex, especially in alliances, and become even more complicated when the decision is intricate or embedded, Burglund emphasized. “You as individual have certain attitudes, beliefs, and values that effect how you make decisions. It is a lot easier for me to ask if you will go out and buy a loaf of bread vs. change a specific brand of car or attend a different college. You willingness to change the buying pattern will be different.”

 

How to get to collaboration in a world of culturally entrenched views, tastes, and opinions is one of the challenges alliance managers face in the decision-making process, he indicated. Its about the Conviction Curvea framework of personal buying perspective: “In the alliance world, where you are in this curve will dictate how likely you are to change. If you are going into a governance meeting, the further to the right [on the Conviction Curve] you are, the more difficult it will be to change that position and the more resources and energy it will take.”

 

It’s like a sculptor molding a lump of clay, he added. At first, he or she has the ability to mold it into whatever structure desired, but over time, the clay hardens and becomes more difficult to change. “Working across two companies, with their positions embedded in their respective organizationsit’s hard to change. And you will see that exemplified in alliance management,” he warned.

 

A critical point for alliance managers to consider is the importance of understanding your potential partner and responding appropriately to their behaviors to get to that point of collaboration. Negotiation is all about winning, while collaboration is preferable because its jointly created value that can determine the tone of the relationship, he reminded the audience. Build the alliance from within the alliance and push it outward, he advised. “When you deploy this kind of culture and process, its being organically driven within our organizations.”

 

After challenging participants to consider three very different case scenarios, he asked in one case: “What were the factors that led this alliance to result in a joint decision?” He then drove home the value of using “company pre-meetings to understand your own convictions and then using that information to design the meeting. Choose the right people for the job, make sure that whatever is going into governance meetings has been jointly agreed upon by the parties, and eliminate the opportunity for walk-ins. You really want to limit that discussion, and push it out of governance meeting,” he advised. “Even more important, sit down and talk about company differences. You don’t have to agree, but you need to agree on how you present your different sides,” he added.

 

Then evangelize these norms with the working teams. If you have this kind of behavior in teams, collaboration will be the norm, he concluded.

 

Learn more on this topic in the recently published Q3 2015 Strategic Alliance Magazine editorial supplement article “Choose Wisely: Increase Alliance Value through Collaborative Decision-Making,” sponsored by Eli Lilly and Co. and co-authored by Berglund and Lilly’s Chief Alliance Officer David Thompson, CA-AM.

Tags:  alliance management  alliance manager  alliances  collaboration  conviction curve  Eli Lilly and Company  governance  Mike Berglund  negotiation  partners  pre-meetings 

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Sharing Alliance Management Capabilities across Enterprise and Globe: Takeda’s Center of Excellence Case Study

Posted By John W. DeWitt, Friday, September 11, 2015

Organizations today are collaborating at a pace that far outstrips the available resources of most alliance management organizations. While many collaborations don’t call for a full-time alliance professional, stakeholders typically need access some level of alliance management capabilities. At Wednesday’s ASAP Leadership Forum, held on the opening day of the 2015 ASAP BioPharma Conference in Boston, I chatted with several seasoned biopharma alliance executives about how they increasingly are being pulled into advisory roles for new types of alliances—presenting exciting opportunities, yes, but piling more responsibilities onto an already heavy workload.

 

Developing a “center of excellence,” or COE, for alliance management represents an increasingly common approach for distributing the toolkits and tool-using expertise of alliance management more broadly across the organization for the use of both dedicated and part-time alliance managers. Takeda, Japan’s largest pharma company with ¥1.778 billion  annual revenues, built an ASAP Excellence Award-winning COE guided by alliance management practice but heavily engaging stakeholders outside the function in the COE’s design. On Thursday afternoon, three Takeda executives shared their methodology, challenges, and results in a conference session titled “From the User’s Perspective: An Alliance Management Center of Excellence Success Story.”

 

Two of Takeda’s senior directors of global alliance management, Gray Hulick, CA-AM, and Jenny Rohde, CA-AM, set the stage by describing the COE’s development and the cross-functional team involved. “Our main finding”—and driver of the COE—was that “Takeda didn’t have consistent approach to managing alliances,” explained Rohde. Takeda had a vision of the COE as “a hub for members to access alliance management tools, training, and share best practices, guided by an executive steering committee from across the organization, inclusive of functional area heads, and staffed across the globe.”

 

The COE was carefully designed from the end-user—meaning non-alliance executive—perspective.

 

“We did detailed needs assessments with the idea of really creating tools that our members need,” Hulick explained. “Interestingly, the needs are remarkably similar. People didn’t have access to tools, formal or informal alliance management training, and were unclear about what they were supposed to be doing in their jobs.” So for some end users, the COE’s key job was to make existing assets accessible. “We utilized in many cases tools and training we had access to—we already have toolkits focused on development and commercial partnerships.”

 

However, Takeda at that time lacked a research alliances toolkit—“something much more streamlined for research alliances,” as Hulick put it. This was developed with the deep involvement of Takeda’s third presenter—Kentaro Hashimoto, PhD, associate director of the oncology drug discovery unit in Takeda’s pharmaceutical research division. The need for the toolkit is clear. “More than 50 percent of our pipeline now comes from external partners—so as a research division this shows how important external innovation is to us,” Hashimoto said. More than 200 research alliances translated into an overwhelming task for non-professional managers. “Sometimes scientists serve not just as investigator and project manager, but also as alliance manager,” and across Takeda there was “a diversity of mindsets on how to manage alliances,” he explained. “Our vision is to have access to a worldwide network of scientific excellence” enabled by partnering excellence.

 

The toolkits—developed by the global team of end users and alliance executives that comprise the COE—were originally written in English, but then were translated by Japanese end users as a means of increasing end user ownership and making sure that the content is actionable by these end users. Takeda also has chosen not to mandate their use, but rather to create end-user pull for these resources.

 

Hashimoto shared several key lessons learned.

 

“I have to be honest, in the real world, it’s not so easy,” he said. “It really takes a long time to change mindset, people’s behavior, because they have their own experiences, and alliance managers have their own skills and experience too. So it can be difficult to move to a new way. Finding the right balance is important. You need to use alliance management toolkits and skills in the right time and right way. For example, forcing consensus (to sign the deal) at an early stage among researchers is not always the right way. You need to give them time before pushing for consensus. And governance—you can try to keep it as in the original contract, but sometimes the science brings things you didn’t realize, and you should follow the science, be flexible, even change if needed.”

 

Hashimoto emphasized that his involvement in the COE was a rewarding experience in many ways.

 

“I always enjoy working with COE core members. It was exciting to be part of this initiative.” And, he added, “From the user’s perspective in the research division, I got a chance to understand how our alliance management [capability] applies in a very objective way to our research activities. And we had the chance to develop by ourselves the toolkits and training programs to make our activities better.”

Tags:  2015 ASAP BioPharma Conference  alliance management  ASAP Excellence Award  center of excellence  COE  Gray Hulick  Jenny Rohde  Kentaro Hashimoto  Takeda  training 

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2015 ASAP BioPharma Conference Focuses on the Importance of Alliance Expertise and Leadership in the Life Sciences and Healthcare Ecosystems

Posted By Cynthia Hanson, Thursday, July 2, 2015

Biopharma is undergoing a sea change, driven both from within and without. Scientific, regulatory and market forces are introducing new alliance partners and partnering models. “Alliance Expertise at the Forefront: Leadership for the Ecosystem,” the theme of the 2015 ASAP Biopharma Conference, Sept. 9-11, in Boston, Mass., addresses this dynamic and the impact it is having on the role of alliance management.  The conference will explore why alliance managers need to get out ahead of this fundamental shift in the increasingly interconnected network of new and existing partners; why ecosystems are beginning to emerge now; how they differ from traditional markets; what new incentives will emerge, and the best ways for individual organizations to respond.

 

The two-day event happening over three days at the Revere Hotel, Boston Common, kicks off late afternoon Wednesday, Sept. 9, with conference keynote Niven R. Narain, co-founder, president, and chief technology officer at Berg Health, a Boston-based biopharma company known for its use of big data and artificial intelligence algorithms to isolate the root causes of disease and develop personalized treatment options for patients. Narain will discuss an innovative partnership Berg has formed with an array of hospitals and research teams to discover the first clinical biomarker for pancreatic research using its technology. The afternoon’s events will conclude with a reception to connect with partners and colleagues, and network among some of the industry’s leading alliance professionals.  

Thursday morning will feature “ASAP Quick Takes,” patterned after the well-known “TED Talks,” delivered by outstanding speakers in a plenary session. Heather Fraser, global life sciences & healthcare lead at IBM’s Institute for Business Values, will present a very timely talk “Partnering in the Healthcare and Life Sciences Ecosystem.” The session offers data and case studies on ways that biopharma companies are partnering within the ecosystem to optimize performance and address the challenges of today’s regulatory and market challenges. According to Fraser, ecosystems are transforming much of the way healthcare and the life sciences industries operate, including why and how they are partnering and with whom.  

“Alliance Leadership for the Healthcare Ecosystem,” by Cindy Warren, vice president of alliance management at Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson, will address what today’s alliance professional needs to tackle the changing biopharma environment. Partnering models are rapidly changing, and it requires keen skills, adaptability, agility, finesse, and the potential of someone running a business, says Warren. With over 21 years of broad industry experience, Warren will provide the tips and insider insights alliance managers need, what she looks for in her team, and where she sees opportunities for alliance professionals to deliver differentiated value that can set companies apart.  

Following the Quick Takes, “Deeper Dive” sessions feature both more in-depth presentations by the plenary speakers and exchanging ideas with peers in solution-focused roundtable discussions on a range of leadership issues and alliance management challenges. The remainder of the conference features a variety of interactive presentations, mini-workshops and expert panels addressing the skills and expertise alliance professionals need today. A few of the topics covered include negotiation, alliance decision making, managing transitions, and working with CROs to enhance innovation.  

“Alliance Expertise at the Forefront: Leadership for the Ecosystem,” attracts partnering executives, academics, innovators, managers, patient advocates, service organizations, and other life sciences and healthcare representatives from countries around the world. For more information on registration for this not-to-be missed conference in the midst of one of the most vibrant biopharma hubs in the world, visit www.asapweb.org/biopharma. Save on your 2015 ASAP BioPharma Conference registration by becoming an ASAP member today! For more information, contact the Association of Strategic Alliance Professionals director of membership services Lori Gold at+1 781-562-1630 ext. 203 or lgold@strategic-alliances.org.

Tags:  alliance management  ASAP BioPharma Conference  Berg Health  Biopharma  Cindy Warren  Ecosystem  Healthcare  Heather Fraser  IBM’s Institute for Business Values  Janssen Pharmaceutical  Life Sciences  Niven R. Narain 

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Official ASAP Announcement and Forthcoming Q2 Strategic Alliance Magazine Article Shine the Spotlight on 2015 ASAP Alliance Excellence Award Winners

Posted By Cynthia Hanson, Tuesday, May 12, 2015

Think “rock star teams” with people “aligned and marching in the same direction” working to make significant contributions to society, science, sustainability, and corporate alliance management practices. That would be the winners of the 2015 ASAP Alliance Excellence Awards, which were presented March 3 at the 2015 ASAP Global Alliance Summit, officially announced in an ASAP press release this week, and will be recognized in the soon-to-be-published Q2 issue of Strategic Alliance Magazine. 

The 2015 recipients of the ASAP Alliance Excellence Awards are: 

  • National Grid/Earth Networks for Individual Alliance Excellence
  • The Dow Chemical Company/The Nature Conservancy for Alliance for Corporate Social Responsibility
  • Philips for Innovative Best Alliance Practice with honorable mention to Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson
  • Takeda Pharmaceuticals for Alliance Program Excellence with honorable mention to Bayer HealthCare
  • ASAP RTP Chapter for the Chapter Excellence Award 

The forthcoming Strategic Alliance Magazine article shares insights from a live Q&A session with the award winners. Moderator Jan Twombly, CSAP, president of The Rhythm of Business, asked recipients about key learnings.  At its core, our project “was about making decisions for all society. It moved us beyond basic philanthropy,” observed Elizabeth Uhlhorn, sustainability program manager at Dow Chemical. Dow and The Nature Conservancy received the Alliance for Corporate Social Responsibility Award for their partnership, which factors the value of nature into business decisions—a crucial step forward in fostering sustainability. 

National Grid won the Individual Alliance Excellence Award, which is given to a company that has excelled in planning, implementation, and results for a single alliance—in this case, with Earth Network’s weather monitoring equipment distributor WeatherBug. Asked what made their efforts awards-winning, “Our alliance delivered twice, first for National Grid to better understand where damage will occur.  Second, with community engagement and stewardship,” responded Eliza Davis, lead program manager, alliance and vendor strategy at National Grid. 

The awards “highlight some of the very best achievements in the industry and require hundreds of hours of work to qualify,” said Michael Leonetti, CSAP, president and CEO of ASAP, while announcing the winners. “There were more applicants this year than ever before,” added co-presenter Annlouise Goodermuth, CSAP, director of alliance management, strategy, science policy, and external innovation at Sanofi. 

To learn more about and from the award winners, don’t miss the forthcoming Q2 issue of Strategic Alliance Magazine—and read the full ASAP press release

Tags:  alliance management  ASAP Alliance Excellence Awards  ASAP RTP Chapter  Bayer HealthCare  Earth Networks  Eliza Davis  Elizabeth Uhlhorn  Janssen Pharmaceutical  National Grid  Philips  Strategic Alliance Magazine  sustainability  Takeda Pharmaceuticals  The Dow Chemical Company  The Nature Conservancy  WeatherBug 

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A “Get Smart” Opportunity for Alliance Managers—ASAP Smart Cities Summit in Brussels to Improve Partnering Practices for Industries and Planners

Posted By Cynthia Hanson, Friday, May 1, 2015

In the last decade or so, we’ve incorporated Smartphones, cars, appliances, and other technologies into our daily lives. Now this technology and planning are merging at a mega-scale to create Smart Cities to form the best combinations of the smarts. Alliance managers have a mega-role in this trend, and the Association of Strategic Alliance Professionals has jumped on the bandwagon with a ASAP EU Smart Cities event, in Brussels, Belgium, June 12, at the Brussels44Center, where attendees will have the opportunity to learn how to create smart alliances from master planners and technology gurus to develop best alliances practices for the future.

Annick De Swaef of Consensa Consulting, president of the BeNeLux (Belgium, Netherlands, Luxembourg) Chapter of ASAP in Brussels, and an ASAP EPP (Education Partner Provider) (see Q1 2015, Strategic Alliance Magazine, “Europe’s Alliance Evangelist,” Pg. 34) is on the cusp of this trend as moderator and local co-organizer of the event. “The purpose of the Smart Cities event is to bring together a variety of professionals involved in designing and implementing Smart Cities project consortia, alliances, and eco-systems,” she says. “The event aims to assemble different industries—from engineering and construction to telecom and technology.”

For more information and registration, visit http://www.strategic-alliances.org/page/smartcities .

The first global ASAP EU Smart Cities event of its kind will be attended by both international and local participants, as well as representatives from both large and small enterprises. The Smart Cities committee decided to locate the global event in Brussels because it’s the capital of the European Union and the European Commission and European Parliament are located at the center. The metropolitan is also home for many European agencies directly involved in Smart Cities programs across Europe. 

The event promises to provide some of the best Smart Cities experts in the industry, such as British architect and urban designer Kelvin Campbell, chair of Smart Urbanism, an open-source urban research and development organization; Dr. Henriette van Eijl, policy coordinator of the Directorate of “Innovative and Sustainable Mobility” in the European Commission's Directorate-general for Mobility and Transport (MOVE); Kim Möric, a renowned legal advisor in European administrative and public law, partner at DLA Piper UK LLP, and Chairman of the nonprofit organization “PPP Wallonie-Bruxelles: réseau de competences” (PPP Network).  For the schedule of events, visit http://www.strategic-alliances.org/page/smartcities . 

The European Union has launched an ambitious Investment Plan for Europe, worth €315 billion, to encourage investment in strategic projects, such as ones aimed at developing Smart Cities, De Swaef explains. “Different economic and societal challenges need to be tackled urgently in the coming decade in Europe. In one form or another most of these challenges relate to leveraging the existing housing, transport, energy, and digital infrastructure into sustainable drivers for growth and welfare. For ASAP, it’s the right timing to intensify the promotion of the alliance management discipline as a tangible added value for companies to participate successfully in Smart Cities initiatives across Europe.” 

ASAP sponsored two Smart Cities events in the United States last year in conjunction with Schneider Electric through the New England and Southeast Chapters. The global Smart Cities event is sponsored by ARCADIS, SAS Institute, and Schneider Electric.

The cost to attend is €200 for ASAP Members, and €450 for non-members click here to register today. If non-members join ASAP BEFORE registering for the event they will save €250 on their event registration.  Join ASAP online by clicking here or call Lori Gold, Director of Member Services at +1 781.562-1630 ext. 203.

Tags:  Alliance Management  alliance practices  Annick De Swaef  ARCADIS  ASAP EU Smart Cities  Association of Strategic Alliance Professionals  Brussels44Center  European Commission  European Union  SAS Institute  Schneider Electric  smart alliances  smart cities 

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