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Increasing Strength through P2P Muscle Building (Part 2): Cisco and SMART Partnering Execs Delve into the ‘Value Exchange Challenge’ at 2018 ASAP Tech Partner Forum

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Monday, October 15, 2018

2x, 5x, 10x. How can companies gain extra oomph and advantage in the emerging multi-partner, multi-industry ecosystem? That’s the central theme of the session “Value Exchange Challenge: Building the New P2P Ecosystem Partnering Muscle” being offered at the 2018 ASAP Tech Partner Forum, “Reimaging Part­nering in a Disruptive World,” on October 17 at the Four Points by Sheraton, San Jose Airport, San Jose, California. The session will be presented by two speakers: Lorin Coles, CSAP, CEO, Alliancesphere, and principal, SMART Partnering; Kashif Abbasi, senior director, partner sales acceleration, global partner organization, Cisco Systems, Inc. I had the pleasure recently of talking at length with Coles, an animated and crisp speaker, about the driving force behind the session and the accompanying Cisco case study. Part two of our discussion follows.

ASAP Media: How does Cisco Systems enter into this value exchange equation as a case study?

We will lay out an example to understand the transformation Cisco is going through according to customer needs. Their new market model is built around new consumption and outcome-based models that go to market. At Cisco, they had to go beyond selling recurring software. It was no longer about landing the deal. It was about consumption and adoption in the entire customer lifecycle, and adoption to expansion to renewal. What they had to realize was that they had to help orchestrate the ecosystem and scale out this capability. They needed a scaling engine where they had different programs, different pipelines of enablement, automation, and sales acceleration. One of their areas of sales acceleration that is co-delivered with Alliancesphere is called ACES, which stands for Accelerating Cisco Ecosystem Sales, to take the complexity out and accelerate muscle building. ACES@Scale co-develops this methodology for its use partnerships and a framework to accelerate multiparty solution sales. It’s a proven methodology to sell Cisco architecture through 100% ready solutions with a faster time to booking. The key is bringing packaged solutions to market for their channelmulti-partner solutions all the way to resellers.

What else will you be covering in this session?

We will close it off by talking about the future of co-selling, which is all around the customer, the buyers, and the solutions. And it’s really about empowering the partners to exchange value from both the buyer and seller journey to help all parties realize the desired business outcomes. We will provide point of view on complexity of solutions versus buyer dynamics. Based on different co-selling scenarios, we will determine the best way to work with your partners. It’s a muscle that needs developing at all levels of organizations: from the executive team to management to the frontline - not just the sellers or tech team. The whole organization has to begin to work and operate differently.

What is driving the change, this need for a P2P muscle-building approach?

The change in the market and what customers are looking for: real solutions to solve problems in more proactive ways that eliminate the friction and focus on their needs and deliver to their outcomes. This kind of capability muscle is incremental. Building out the muscle and muscle memory becomes more effective the more you do itit gets stronger and stronger. It will become the core to the future of business. We’re going to look at it from a market and customer view, what it could mean to the audience, and then open it up to a Q&A session.

See part one of this blog and follow the ASAP Media team’s ongoing coverage of the October 17, 2018 ASAP Tech Partner Forum on the ASAP Blog at www.strategic-alliances.org.  Learn more and register for the ASAP Tech Forum at http://asaptechforum.org

Tags:  Alliancesphere  Cisco Systems  cross-functional  digital transformation  enablement  engagement  execution  Kashif Abbasi  Lorin Coles  P2P  partner  partnering  SMART Partnering  The Rhythm of Business  value creation 

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Increasing Strength through P2P Muscle Building (Part 1): Cisco and SMART Partnering Execs Delve into the ‘Value Exchange Challenge’ at 2018 ASAP Tech Partner Forum

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Thursday, October 11, 2018

2x, 5x, 10x. How can companies gain extra oomph and advantage in the emerging multi-partner, multi-industry ecosystem? That’s the central theme of the session “Value Exchange Challenge: Building the New P2P Ecosystem Partnering Muscle” being offered at the 2018 ASAP Tech Partner Forum, “Reimaging Part­nering in a Disruptive World,” on October 17 at the Four Points by Sheraton, San Jose Airport, San Jose, California. The session will be presented by two speakers: Lorin Coles, CSAP, CEO, Alliancesphere, and principal, SMART Partnering; Kashif Abbasi, senior director, partner sales acceleration, global partner organization, Cisco Systems, Inc. I had the pleasure recently of talking at length with Coles, an animated and crisp speaker, about the driving force behind the session and the accompanying Cisco case study. Part one  of our discussion follows.

ASAP Media: Why is value so central to your presentation?

Lorin Coles: The core of all partnering and partnerships is really about value and trust. When two companies come together, they are looking for where and how they can help each other create greater value for the customer. That’s a value exchangeit occurs at multiple levels with multiple people in alliances. Partnerships in the past had specific way that they did it. Now, because of digital transformation and the speed, scale, and scope of change, it’s more complex than ever to create contextually relevant value for your partners and customers because there are new buyers, and the solutions are more complex. If there is no value, it’s difficult to partner. Value is the cornerstone in everything we do. The value exchange is where and how we are going to partner together.

How can companies build Partner-to-Partner (P2P) ecosystem partnering muscle?

Partnering evolves over time just like sports evolves over time. You need to go from enablement to engagement to execution. You do that by working cross-functionally at multiple levels with companies.

It’s important to understand the different personalities of your partner and the audience, the difference between partner types, and the functionthe marketing, sales, and product people and the roles they play in the partnership. And more importantly than ever, you need to understand the value exchange.

Building that new muscle is something a lot of people can’t do because it takes connecting dots that others don’t see. It’s important to determine if you are a novice, intermediate, advanced, or expert when building up this muscle. Companies are becoming more and more dependent on partnering and need to learn how to partner in more proactive ways than before. They need to understand when and where to bring in partners, how to leverage partners. The process is different than before because it’s across an ecosystem.

How does Cisco Systems enter into this value exchange equation as a case study?

We will lay out an example to understand the transformation Cisco is going through according to customer needs.

See the remainder of our discussion with Lorin Coles in part two of this article and follow the ASAP Media team’s ongoing coverage of the 2018 ASAP Tech Partner Forum on the ASAP Blog at www.strategic-alliances.org. Learn more and register for the 2018 ASAP Tech Partner Forum at http://asaptechforum.org

Tags:  Alliancesphere  Cisco Systems  cross-functional  digital transformation  enablement  engagement  execution  Kashif Abbasi  Lorin Coles  P2P  partner  partnering  SMART Partnering  The Rhythm of Business  value creation 

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Finalists and Winners Share the Accolades at Upbeat 2018 Alliance Excellence Awards Ceremony

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Wednesday, March 28, 2018

Celebrating hard work, innovation, generous contributions to society, volunteer time, and other accomplishments, ASAP lauded several companies and partnerships at the 2018 ASAP Alliance Excellence Awards on March 26 during the ASAP Global Alliance Summit, “Propelling Partnering for the On-Demand World: New Perspectives + Proven Practices for Collaborative Business,” in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, USA.

“All of our finalists are winners. They really are” through their thoughtful engagement, documentation, and impressive submissions, said Michael Leonetti, CSAP, president and CEO of ASAP. “It’s so difficult to select” a winner from such an outstanding pool of finalists, he then observed.

Referring to the 20th anniversary of ASAP’s beginnings, Norma Watenpaugh, CSAP, ASAP Advisory Board member and founding principal of Phoenix Consulting Group, provided some history about the first ASAP awards ceremony in 2001 and the evolution of the judging process. An “old-timer” and chair of the Excellence Awards Committee, she joined the judging process in 2003. “Some have been on the committee from the beginning of time, some are new recruits—reading, scoring, and deciding on nominees. They represent different industries,” she explained. What originally started as one lone awards category in 2001 evolved into multiple awards, which were captured at the ceremony by five of nine finalists for their exceptional contributions:

The Alliance Program Excellence Award, presented to organizations instilling the capability to consistently implement and manage alliance portfolios and demonstrate success of those alliances over time, was given to pharmaceutical Amgen for its exceptional biopharma alliance program. Secured by three pillars, the program delineates clear roles and alignment of strategic objectives and value drivers through a partnership; ensures best practice execution on every alliance through an alliance kickoff and playbook; optimizes oversight of Amgen’s alliance portfolio.

The Individual Alliance Excellence Award, presented to a specific alliance for excellence in planning, implementation, and resultseither between two companies or multiple organizationsfor instituting practices, tools, and methodologies in support of successful formation and management, was given to pharmaceutical partners MSD and Julphar for the formation of the DUNES alliance. The alliance serves seven therapeutic areas for six countries in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region, a challenging area of the world for business development. “Alliances aren’t business as usual in that part of the world, and MSD-Julphar opened new doors,” commented Watenpaugh when presenting the award.

Two Innovative Best Alliance Practice Awards, presented to a company for individual alliance management tools, functions, methods, or processes that have made an immediate and powerful impact on the organization and/or discipline of alliance management, were given to pharmaceuticals MedImmune and Shire “for their big-picture view in their portfolio of alliances.” The high-impact tool or process used must show results, such as easing management, saving costs, increasing speed, and/or growing revenue. Medimmune received the award for an alliance information management system and dashboard reporting tools that enable widespread visibility of alliance performance in near-real time, including consolidation of alliance data that provides visibility across the organization. Shire received the award for introducing a new best practice for partner crisis to manage stakeholders through a crisis situation. The system was originally developed to help navigate a merger; it has since been tested and validated for several additional applications.

The Alliance for Corporate Social Responsibility Award is presented to companies that demonstrate a profound, measurable, and positive social impact, with the principal objective social impact, not profit—although profit, especially if used to fund program expansion, is not discouraged. This year’s award was given to Cisco Systems and Dimension Data. The companies banded together for their 25-year celebration of alliance success by kicking off 25 projects focused on creating social good, which resulted in a record year for the partnership.

Not to be forgotten for their exceptional contributions, Leonetti also presented several Chapter Excellence Awards to members who have gone above and beyond in volunteer time organizing quality events within a local geography “because they love what they do.” The New England, French, Midwest (honorable mention), and Research Triangle Park chapters received awards for their use of best practices, development of relationships in the community, strong commitment, exceptional programming, and an array of additional contributions. Leonetti then extended special thanks to Becky Lockwood, CSAP, leader of the ASAP Chapter Presidents Council, for her leadership in organizing and keeping the chapter work effectively and smoothly flowing. 

Tags:  2018 ASAP Alliance Excellence Awards  Amgen  biopharma alliance program  Cisco Systems  collaboration  dashboard  Dimension Data  DUNES alliance  Julphar  MedImmune  MSD  partnership  Shire 

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Competencies versus Characteristics in Driving Partner Performance

Posted By Genevieve Fraser, Monday, March 20, 2017
Updated: Friday, March 17, 2017

The use of competencies as a hiring tool has evolved into a gold standard for many professions, including alliance management.  But can competencies as a stand-alone tool effectively identify those who will be successful in the role? 
 

The question was front and center at the sessionTraits and Attributes of Successful Alliance Managers” as Andy Eibling, CSAP, vice president of alliance management at Covance, and Kerri Lampard, CSAP, director of the global services center of excellence in the global partner organization at Cisco Systems, reviewed how and why competencies alone should not be used to hire alliance managers. The session was part of theDriving Partner Performance” offerings at the 2017 ASAP Global Alliance Summit “Profit, Innovation, and Value for the Partnering Enterprise,” which took place at the San Diego Marriott Mission Valley, San Diego, California. 
 

“So, how do you locate, develop, and hire alliance managers? Why do some excel and others struggle? What are the traits that help people to succeed?” Lampard asked as she posed a string of key questions at the opening of the session.

 

Lampard’s overall answer? Competencies can be taught, she explained. However, characteristics are more locked in. Companies need to align the candidate with the organization and look at overarching characteristics, she said. “For, example, Big Pharma can be change adverse. There’s a natural trepidation built into the culture due to the length of time it takes between the inception of a project, the roll out, and the cost.”

Andy Eibling focused on traits that help people succeed such as vision - the ability to see the big picture possibilities. “When a person has vision, they have the natural curiosity and desire to learn and balance change, to decide the appropriate time and place to take risk, to pivot and think about where they're going.  Their role is to strategize and then get people to buy in.”

Advocacy is also important, Eibling stated. “It’s important for an alliance manager to be able to see both sides and understand why someone is acting the way they do.  Folks who can step back and fit into someone else's shoes, advocate for them and articulate issues, can take conflict and make it productive. They move the process forward.”

“One of the most important characteristics is the ability to engender trust,” he added. “Employ the Vegas rules. What is said in a conversation stays in the conversation. The ability to engender trust is crucial. People within an organization and partners need to know they can have a candid conversation before it becomes a big issue,” he also noted. “It’s important to understand, as [Henry] Kissinger once said, that ‘Competing pressures tempt one to believe that anissue deferred isa problem avoided; more often, it is acrisis invited.’”

Tags:  alliance manager  alliances  Andy Eibling  Cisco Systems  Competencies  Covance  engender trust  hiring tool  Kerry Lampard  partner performance 

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One Is Silver and the Other’s Gold: ASAP Summit Session Emphasizes Expansion Opportunities through Customer Renewal

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Thursday, March 2, 2017

New customers can hold great opportunity, but don’t neglect the old accounts because they hold hidden gold that can maximize revenue through expansion. That seemed to be the main message Jeff Newton, CSAP, global strategic alliance manager at Cisco Systems, and his colleague, Manoj Bhatia, CSAP, worldwide sales and business development manager at Cisco, conveyed to the audience during their session “Accelerate Partner Sales through a Customer Success Methodology.” Then they explained how to do it. The talk took place at the recent 2017 ASAP Global Alliance Summit, “Profit, Innovation, and Value for the Part­nering Enterprise,” Feb. 28–March 2, at the San Diego Marriott Mission Valley, San Diego, California. Newton shared some thoughts from the session during an interview about his customer sales methodology.


How is the partner ecosystem changing/expanding to address new buying patterns?

From Cisco’s perspective, we are moving into lines of business where finance and marketing teams are making a lot of the decisions. It takes an ecosystem to deliver the right solution to the right customer. We need to ask how the changing ecosystem is impacting partners. We need to partner with the right people with the right technology. It’s really hard for one company to deliver the entire outcome.

Different people are making the decisions now. In the past, we would go into the IT department, find out the budget, and see how much product could be delivered. We have evolved to understanding what their pains are. To understand customers better, how can technology solve that problem? So it’s not really about selling product, it’s about selling solutions to business problems that the people in lines of business are having.

What is the role of alliance management in managing the customer?

It is good to understand what the customer is after. Ask yourself, what business problems are we solving? From an alliance management perspective, we need to put together the right ecosystem for the problem and solve the specific problem for each industry and vertical.

Please sum up your “customer success” methodology to drive an alliance to land, adopt, expand, and renew opportunities.

It’s about what the cost is to acquire a new customer. Companies spend a lot of time landing the new customer. Businesses forget to go back to that customer and find news ways to generate revenue with that customer. If you are adopting technology, you will be a lot more open. If you are helping a client build a data center, you may want to get into different lines of business to expand your sale. Also, we often don’t pay attention to sales teams, don’t focus enough on new opportunities, and we need to change our alliances to not only go after new business, but also expand together within the customer arena.

How can we measure our progress with customers?

There are some very different types of metrics we can look at. One thing I look at is the renewal rate for our support services. The industry average is about 90 percent, so if you go below 90 percent, you have an opportunity. It’s a compelling event to expand. The technology you have in your partner ecosystem will also help expand the sales and grow your footprint inside of a customer.

What are the best ways for alliance teams to lead this business transition and implement a customer success approach?

First, you really need to understand this methodology. Start looking at customers together in the same fashion. Ask how can we educate our sales teams on the ability to expand the opportunity and prepare for the renewal of the opportunity? How do we get our sales teams to think differently to engage with the customer? Look at the customer journey. Explore what they want to buy, and then evaluate it through a demonstration or something else, then the purchase, renewal opportunity, and then they can become your advocate inside the company. 

Tags:  alliance  alliance management  Cisco Systems  customer engagement  ecosystem  Jeff Newton  Manoj Bhatia  methodology  Partner Sales  technology 

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