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What’s Brewing in the 2016 Biopharma Conference Beaker? | Part 1

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Tuesday, July 19, 2016

In a recent interview, ASAP CEO Mike Leonetti, CSAP, provided a sampling of what’s to come at the 2016 ASAP BioPharma Conference. He offered insights into the changing landscape for partnerships and how alliance managers and others need to adapt, as well as a preview of speakers and cutting edge sessions and workshops.  

Why is this a must-attend conference for alliance managers, CEOs, and others working in the biopharma, healthcare, and life sciences industries? 

Partnership management is changing. If they are performing their jobs the same way they were two years ago, they likely are leaving money on the table or missing great new opportunities. This year’s conference offers programming to learn how to partner in new environments, which includes tech, academic, and healthcare system partnerships. An ongoing message of the conference is to understand that the ecosystem is getting larger, and their enterprise now represents their company, partners, and the entire healthcare system. As alliance managers, we can no longer be comfortable defining our box as an asset partnership and staying there. We will limit our creation of value in our companies unless we harvest the enterprise. 

What’s new at this year’s conference? 

We are going to talk a lot about the changes in partnerships across the industry. We are not only going to talk about biopharma and healthcare, we are going to hear from people on the tech side of ASAP regarding what’s important and best practices when partnering with tech. It will provide key opportunities to learn about tech companies and how they partner. If biopharma and healthcare are going to partner with tech, each of these industries needs to have a clear understanding of the others’ expectations. 

What timely message is Dr. Samuel Nussbaum, strategic consultant at EGB Advisors, Inc., likely to provide during his keynote address? 

The keynote, “Healing the U.S. Health Care System: Collaboration is Essential,” which is scheduled for the afternoon of Wed., Sept. 7, will tie directly into our theme. Sam is going to talk about his background and expertise with the impact of public policy on healthcare systems and healthcare reform. He will talk a lot about how important collaboration is to finding a solution to our system crisis; my guess is he may try to give examples of how manufacturers, payers, policy experts, academics, and anybody else in the healthcare system can collaborate and partner to overcome major obstacles regarding healthcare reform. 

Who will give the plenary address? 

Our plenary will be given by Stéphane Thiroloix, CEO of Mayoly Spindler, on the morning of Thurs., Sept. 8. Mayoly Spindler is an emerging family-owned, independent French company, originally founded by a husband-and-wife team working to provide gastroenterology and dermatology healthcare solutions. Stéphane joined as managing director in 2014, and he has lots of leadership experience from working in multiple biopharma executive roles before joining Mayoly Spindler. He is an advocate who understands what it takes to be successful in a partnership and basically created the partnership management function in his last two roles.  He will share what a CEO’s expectations are for alliance management success. 

To view the program and download brochure information, go to www. asapweb.org/biopharma.

Tags:  alliance management  biopharma  collaborate  Dr. Samuel Nussbaum  ecosystem  healthcare  healthcare reform  Mayoly Spindler  partner  partnership  Partnership management  Partnerships  public policy  Stéphane Thiroloix  tech 

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Managing Complex Software Engineering Alliances in a World Teeming With Digital Twins

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Thursday, May 5, 2016
Updated: Wednesday, May 4, 2016

Michael Moser spends a good deal of his day collaborating in a digital world. With tech experience that reaches back 25 years with some of the biggest companies in the industry, such as HP, he is well-positioned to manage very complex software engineering alliances. When he came onboard at Dassault Systémes in Vélizy-Villacoublay, France, 15 years ago, he had already been introduced to interactive 3-D software, such as the engineering model for the Boeing 777. Since then, 3-D software has evolved significantly; it’s now a realistic, animated prototype capable of interconnecting via the cloud, he explained to me in an interview during the 2016 ASAP Global Alliance Summit “Partnering Everywhere: Expert Leadership for the Ecosystem,” held at the Gaylord National Resort & Convention Center, National Harbor, Maryland. For Moser, who offered the session “Master a Portfolio of Tactics to Animate the Partner Ecosystem,” the challenge of the day is deciding how to build partner networks that capture mushrooming opportunities in a growing industry. 

What are digital twins, and how do customers use them?
Dassault Systémes creates 3-D experiences for customers to sell a product. The customers can then present it digitally through simulation, which allows users to demonstrate and experience the product before a physical product is built. It’s called a digital twin, because you have a twin of your real-world product in the digital world. Dassault works with many industries, such as transportation, shipbuilding, aerospace and defense, high-tech products, architecture and engineering, consumer package goods (supermarkets), life sciences (the human body), energy creation and consumption, natural resources (mining), and security (panic patterns and fires).  The program can create digital twins for nature and the planet, such as altering a riverbed to impact a valley. It can simulate molecules and life and test chemical reactions. It’s all physics in the end. 

What types of projects have used a digital twin?
Electronics, data management, online connections, Internet of Things technology, sensors. It’s used by healthcare a lot, not only for analysis but also for emergency support, and security for simulating a terrorist attack or nuclear accident. If you apply this concept to a city, for example Singapore, which is one of our customers, it can be used to investigate the impact of changes on new buildings and physical parameters, such as lights, wind, and pollution. A client asked Dassault to simulate towing an iceberg from Antarctica to Africa for fresh water. It worked, so now they know it can be done. We also can build thermoanalytic systems for rising temperatures resulting from global warming that consist of human models walking through a city and experiencing temperature variation. 

What are the benefits of building digital twins?
It saves money for the customer as compared to the old model of build a prototype, such as a town in the desert. With a digital twin, you don’t have the expense of building or destroying a physical structure. It’s also much more green and sustainable because you don’t have to building physical structures. With a simulated car crash, you might need 10 prototypes for a crash. With a twin, you only have to build one to certify safety. Another benefit is flexibility: They can be altered to optimize the design. It also saves time. For example, instead of asking customers to walk aisles and document their findings on questionnaires, you can have customers wear goggles, send them through a store, and change the aisles based on capturing their reaction. With goggles, you are really in the midst of the digital twin because it scans the body, and you can actually see your hands. You look down at your feet, and your feet are in the virtual world. You also get better feedback because you can test multiple scenarios to optimize design and collect feedback to incorporate it. 

How do you try to capture this growing, and sometimes illusive, market?
Not only does Dassault simulate and construct prototypes, we are engaged in solution partnerships. There are an enormous number of technology partners with programs integrated into software. They develop solutions and want to sell them, but they aren’t always properly promoted. They need to sell to a broader ecosystem of customers and users. I take those partners’ positions and interests and design a support structure to sell and promote their solutions. One technique I use is a social marketing platform called “Talk,” an online community where partners can explain their solution to potential users. We integrate them to go to market, develop sales leads, and provide a platform to communicate akin to LinkedIn that is comprised of a Dassault customer base. 

What do you foresee for Dassault’s future?
The challenge is to bring it to next level and give more freedom to this ecosystem. If you have a bulletproof Pentagon style, you won’t meet the requirements of the new world, which is integrated instantly with apps. I am in favor of loose controls because if you don’t work that way these days, you will lose opportunity. These skills are more needed than deep technology skills, at least in the partnering environment—you need collaboration skills and open mindedness. 

Tags:  collaboration  Dassault Systémes  digital twin  ecosystem  go to market  Mike Moser  partnerships  technology partners  thermoanalytic systems 

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It is Time to Think Differently - Taming the Complexity of IoT Partnering

Posted By Jan Twombly, CSAP and Jeff Shuman, CSAP, PhD | The Rhythm of Business and SMART Partnering, Wednesday, May 4, 2016

The Internet of Things (IoT) is upending partnering “best practices.” One practice is clear: no company succeeds alone. It takes an ecosystem.

This is partnering at a scale, scope, and speed unprecedented until now. It requires creativity and bold experimentation. Companies must learn quickly, iterate strategies, manage complexity, and try new models for value creation, delivery, and capture.

“We know how to partner. We’ve been doing it for 20 years.” These are deadly words when said about partnering for the Internet of Things. The fundamentals of partnering may still apply – or not – but businesses that until now have been relatively un-digitized are discovering tremendous opportunities to rethink their operations and economics. This necessitates partnering:

  • Across industries and sectors
  • With many more companies for any given industry solution
  • At a greater speed to assemble and reassemble the right partners for each customer scenario
  • With agility, shifting from orchestrator to participant, sometimes with the same customer
  • In conjunction with “Everything as a Service” business models

Innovate and Experiment

Companies that succeed at building the partnering ecosystem required for the IoT take a page from design thinking: Start with the experience of the end customer and play that back to solution development. Those that succeed think similarly about the partner experience, making it easy to engage and drive down transaction costs. They do not lock onto any specific business or partnering model; rather they experiment and learn which of the assumptions you’ve made are valid and which are invalid and need to be iterated.

Instead of copying what competitors consider “best practices,” companies that remake their partnering capabilities for today’s connected world look for other inspiration. For example, Médicins sans Frontières (Doctors without Borders) assembles teams of medical and logistical professionals when conflict breaks out or there is an epidemic. The network has the ability to quickly assemble and then disband when the work is done because it knows what each partner considers valuable and works to ensure that value is received, thus maintaining willingness to participate and contribute value.

Companies throughout the ecosystem, regardless of their role or roles, must be willing to take some risks and fund experimentation to determine what is repeatable and scalable, both in the business and partnering models and in how partnering operations are carried out.

Connective Tissue or Achilles’ Heel

At the ASAP Global Summit in March keynote presenter Jonathan Ballon, Vice President of Intel’s Internet of Things (IoT) Group made it very clear that IoT is a massive opportunity to create and realize tremendous economic value; transforming industries; changing products, services, and solutions, and disrupting business models. He also emphasized that partnering and alliances are the connective tissue required to realize this value. The SMART Partnering Alliance of The Rhythm of Business and Alliancesphere argues that success in the ecosystem partnering required by IoT is not happenstance – it takes careful design. If your company’s partnering capability is insufficient for the task, partnering might be your Achilles’ heel – the exposed and unprotected weak spot of your organization. Alliance professionals have a duty to provide their executives with a roadmap across the new partnering landscape.

Over the next few months, we’ll be publishing a series of blog posts and white papers that explore what is different about partnering in the IoT - and how to apply design thinking – what we call Partner By Design to evolving partnering practices for the connected ecosystem era and everything as a service business models.

Missed the Summit Keynote? Read a Summary and Perspective on it from SMART Partnering.

ASAP was given permission by ASAP Corporate Member, EPPP, and guest bloggers Jan Twombly, CSAP and Jeff Shuman, CSAP, PhD of The Rhythm of Business and SMART Partnering to reprint the contributed blog. 

Tags:  alliance professionals  alliances  Alliancesphere  business model  ecosystem  Intel  Internet of Things  Jonathan Ballon  partner  partnering  SMART Partnering Alliance  The Rhythm of Business 

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Q3 2015 Strategic Alliance Magazine: Alliance Leaders Make the Paradigm Shift to Cross-Industry and Ecosystem Partnering, Plus Partnering in the Channel and More

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Thursday, September 24, 2015

The latest issue of Strategic Alliance Magazine, Q3 2015, now available to ASAP members, invites readers to explore a paradigm shift occurring in the life sciences and healthcare industries (and many others too). Veteran alliance executives discuss how to adapt, lead, and orchestrate in new and innovative ways, as cross-industry collaborations proliferate thanks to high tech and other industries entering the traditional biopharma and healthcare arena. Alliance managers are challenged to read the tea leaves and adapt to customer-centric trends and other drivers forcing change.

 

SAM Q3 2015 also provides a preview of the 2015 ASAP BioPharma Conference that took place in Boston Sept. 9-11 “Alliance Expertise at the Forefront: Leadership for the Ecosystem.” Highlights include the opening evening keynote on the analytics-driven innovative partnerships Boston-based Berg Pharmaceuticals has formed with research hospitals, as well as three “ASAP Quick Takes” given by IBM Institute for Business Value's Heather Fraser, Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson’s Cindy Warren, and the Alzheimer’s Association’s Lenore Jackson-Pope. The talks were preceded by professional development workshops and followed by a rich selection of educational sessions.

 

In our quarterly Alliance Champion feature, I interviewed Leona Kral, CSAP, of Verizon, who offered insights on driving revenue in channel management. Adaptation, agility, and innovation are critical components for alliance managers dealing with a fluid business environment, and that requires a wardrobe of hats alliance managers can wear to compliment their changing roles, she advises. Kral joined with her Verizon colleague Karen Robinson, CSAP, to present ASAP’s September Netcast Webinar, “What in the World are Two Alliance Professionals Doing in the Channel?” available for viewing in the ASAP Member Resource Library.

 

Continuing in the same vein of exploring the challenges (and opportunities) in channel sales partnerships, Dede Haas, CA-AM, founder and president of DLH Services, outlines the problems that make channel partners unhappy with vendors, and then offers practical advice from experienced channel executives on how to improve such collaborations through trust-based relationships.

 

The magazine also spotlighted how corporate member Dassault Systèmes and its partners use three-dimensional visualization technologies and collaborative tools—in the process changing the way business is being done in industries ranging from manufacturing and high tech to architecture and engineering, as well as in the public sector.

 

In the magazine’s quarterly editorial supplement, sponsored by Eli Lilly and Company, Michael Berglund, CA-AM and David Thompson, CA-AM, explore the powerful impact of the “conviction curve” on whether or not decision-making processes are actually collaborative. Berglund also delved into the topic in his well-attended workshop at this month’s ASAP BioPharma Conference, honing in on the crucial distinction of “Are We Negotiating or Collaborating?”

 

“Are you ready to thrive at the center of the action?” asks executive publisher and ASAP President and CEO Michael Leonetti, CSAP, in his engaging Up Front editorial. Alliances are taking new forms as partnering proliferates across the new ecosystem, and this issue of Strategic Alliance Magazine appropriately points out that alliance management needs to be embedded and is an essential component to the culture of today’s business enterprises if they are to adapt and proliferate in the emerging ecosystem.

Tags:  alliance  ASAP BioPharma Conference  Cindy Warren  collaboration  Dassault Systèmes  David Thompson  Dede Haas  ecosystem  Heather Fraser  Karen Robinson  Lenore Jackson-Pope  Leona Kral.ASAP Netcast Webinar  Michael Berglund  Strategic Alliance Magazine 

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Biopharma Alliance Management in the Ecosystem Era: Three Leaders Offer Quick ‘Doses’ of Advice Followed by Deeper Dive ‘Treatments’ for Staying Abreast of Change in the Field

Posted By Cynthia Hanson, Thursday, September 10, 2015

ASAP presented three plenary sessions Thursday morning, Sept. 10, in an engaging new 20-minute topic overview, “ASAP Quick Takes,” designed after the “TED Talks” format as part of the 2015 ASAP BioPharma Conference. The second half of the morning was devoted to “Deeper Dive” sessions with more in-depth plenary presentations and peer exchanges in roundtable discussions focused on particular topics. The three talks were moderated by Jan Twombly, CSAP and president of The Rhythm of Business, Inc. Organized around the theme of “Alliance Expertise at the Forefront: Leadership for the Ecosystem,” the conference kicked off Wed., Sept. 9 at the Revere Hotel in Boston, Mass., USA.

 

First at the podium was Heather Fraser, global life sciences and healthcare lead at IBM’s Institute for Business Value, who discussed “Redefining Partnering in the Healthcare and Life Sciences Ecosystem.” Recent developments and findings have prompted a major shift from the traditional one-to-one partnering model to partnering within the ecosystem. The disruption has impacted not only the traditional pharma and biotech players in the healthcare and life sciences industries, but also less-traditional, sometimes surprising players, such as judicial (law enforcement and the courts), consumer electronics, and the automotive industry, among others. Technology is a major catalyst. While it has forced greater connectivity and openness, it has also resulted in greater complexity in partnering, Fraser said. The new dynamics beg the question “How do I find and connect with the right partners in new and unfamiliar industries and how do I make the connections?”

 

Next on the floor was Cindy Warren, vice president of alliance management at Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson, with her talk on “Alliance Leadership for the Healthcare Ecosystem.” Partnering used to be simple, she said as she presented a slide from the old television show “The Dating Game,” where you asked three questions, and the answers resulted in a clear choice, she said.  The old model of “sharing a soda, talking, and shaking hands” to forge the deal no longer holds up in a business environment impacted by technology and greater complexity. We’re in a new era that requires a partnering approach more akin to “speed dating,” Warren explained—and if you don’t move fast enough, you might not secure the partnership. “Our leaders need to become more agile, more flexible. It’s not just about taking that agreement and executing it, but making sure partners are aligned. It’s about working with it, shaping that collaboration, not just about delivering value, but creating value,” she explained.

 

The final plenary session highlighted patient advocacy while exploring the industry-focused partnering activities of the Alzheimer’s Association. It takes a village to support an Alzheimer patient and his or her caregivers, as emphasized in “Supporting Patients and Families at the Center of the Ecosystem,” presented by Lenore Jackson-Pope, BSN, MSM, CCRP, manager of medical and research education for the association’s Massachusetts/New Hampshire Chapter. The number of Alzheimer’s patients has increased astronomically in the past 15 years, and “the country will be bankrupted if we don’t find solution,” she warned. Through its partnering and advocacy, this patient advocacy organization aims to rapidly address the 3 C’s of the disease—care, cure, and cause—during a time when financial support from the National Institutes of Health is marginal compared to its financial support for cancer, HIV, and other serious diseases. Consequently, the Alzheimer’s Association—which Jackson-Pope described as the world’s largest nonprofit funder of research—has created an extensive network of supporters and partnerships to address the problem.

 

Diving Deeper: What Does It Take to Be an ‘Ecosystem Warrior’?

While fundamentals (such as anticipating and managing risk) often remain important, the role of alliance management changes considerably in the ecosystem, IBM’s Fraser emphasized in her “Deeper Dive” follow-on session.

 

“Thinking back to your roles, the ability to partner beyond current borders requires understanding of new and emerging industries, different regulatory environments, speed to market, and the continuum of health, wellness, and care,” she explained. “You also have to have the stamina to stand up, be counted, and explain why different ideas may work for creating value for your organization moving forward.”

 

This type thinking (and stamina) are required of what she called “successful ecosystem warriors.” Key capabilities including “having that ability to act with speed, but at different speeds in different industries and ecosystems, really being the hunter that goes out and looks at those new and different networks, being the person that’s prepared to be disruptive, and understanding what role your organization needs to take in that ecosystem.”

 

Fraser left the audience with several key questions to consider: 

  • What role does your organization plan to play in the ecosystem?
  • Do you have the skills and capabilities to work in that converged ecosystem?Can you address the cultural aspect—“really getting under the skin of the culture of players you’re going to work with”?

Tags:  Alzheimer’s Association  ASAP Quick Takes  Cindy Warren  ecosystem  Heather Fraser  IBM’s Institute for Business Value  Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies  Lenore Jackson-Pope  partnering  patient advocacy  TED Talks 

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