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On the Eve of Disruption: Summit Keynote Will Explore How Digital Transformation Affects Nearly Every Industry

Posted By Michael J. Burke, Tuesday, April 7, 2020

“Disruption,” in addition to being a much-used term in the business press, is a two-edged sword: an exciting prospect if you’re the one doing the disrupting; not so much if your company or industry finds itself being disrupted and forced to scramble and adapt. Some disruptions may be temporary—as, we fervently hope, will be those spawned by COVID-19—while others are likely here to stay.

It’s these more lasting and far-reaching effects that will be the subject of a keynote address at the ASAP Global Alliance Summit, now scheduled for late June, to be given by Steve Steinhilber, global vice president of ecosystems and business development at Equinix. The presentation, titled “Creating Alliances and Digital Ecosystem Capabilities in an Increasingly Platform Enabled and Interconnected World,” will examine how the speed and scale of information technology growth and new global platforms will enable—and even necessitate—the digital transformation of nearly all businesses, creating many new business models in the process.

According to Steinhilber, the speed and rate of disruption varies by industry, but many existing value chains are already under significant disruptive threat. Industries that are “content sensitive or highly inefficient value chains” have already experienced this disruption, he said, as whole segments of the value chain have been eliminated. These industries include advertising, newspapers, movies, and retail, as well as the travel industry, including hotel bookings and other reservations services.

Others are either just starting out on this journey or find themselves somewhere in the middle. Steinhilber cited the automotive and transportation services industries as examples of verticals that are just beginning to experience the waves of change, while “all layers of the IT industry and also the satellite launch industry” are in the midst of ongoing disruption.

According to an IDC survey, by 2022—less than two years away—at least 60 percent of global GDP will be digitized, with growth in every industry driven by digitally enhanced offerings, operations, and relationships. And according to McKinsey, digital ecosystems will account for more than $60 trillion in revenue by 2025, or more than 30 percent of global corporate revenue. As we’ve seen—and if you haven’t already, check out our cover story on ecosystems in the Q1 2020 issue of Strategic Alliance Quarterly for more on this trend—these disruptive forces are enabled by an explosion of information technology delivered via platform-enabled companies monetized by new business models. These platform models are proving to be much more profitable than product pipeline business models, and also offer accelerated time to market for new products and services and create new ways to share the wealth. This has directly translated into massive growth in platform companies’ market capitalizations.

These new ecosystem- and platform-based models have significant implications for how partnering frameworks and practices are changing, said Steinhilber, requiring “a blend of both strategic, high-touch partner management as well as low-touch engagement via new tools and systems.” And as organizations as a whole struggle to adjust and adapt, today’s—and tomorrow’s—alliance and partnering professionals will need to change their ways, too.

“They’ll still need conventional strategic alliance skills in order to manage complex, highly strategic relationships,” Steinhilber said. “But they’ll also need to have the ability to build programmatic models to engage companies that are wanting to innovate on top of the platform. This means implementing new financial models such as revenue sharing, deploying tools to automate partner engagement and management, developing dashboards that can manage rapid scaling, and being able to ensure the quality of what partners are offering on your platform.”

Curious to learn more? Me too! Stay tuned for more information on this and other outstanding presentations to be offered at the upcoming ASAP Global Alliance Summit. 

Tags:  alliance  digital ecosystems  Digital Transformation  disruptive  ecosystem  engagement  Equinix  frameworks  IDC  IT industry  McKinsey  partner  partnering professionals  platform-based models  satellite launch industry  Steve Steinhilber  strategic relationships  value chains 

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SHORT 3-MINUTE ACTION REQUEST | Share your Experiences in a Joint Survey with IDC

Posted By Kimberly Miller, Friday, October 25, 2019

ASAP and IDC are conducting a joint survey which explores how others are managing alliance metrics and joint comp especially for sales and alliance professionals. The survey has only nine questions and should take you less than three minutes to complete. A post survey overview and results will be shared with the IDC and ASAP member communities. If you are not a member of either community, you can still participate in the survey but must send an email to marketing coordinator Michele Yudysky at myudysky@strategic-alliances.org indicating that you took part in the survey and would like to be included on the distribution list for the report out.

Click on the link below to include your experiences today!

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/5QTRQ8V

Tags:  alliance metrics  ASAP  IDC  joint comp 

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Q4 Sneak Preview of Strategic Alliance Magazine: Cloudy Days Ahead—The Channel Manager’s Role Becomes Collaborative as High Tech’s ‘Third Platform’ Accelerates Disruption

Posted By John W. DeWitt, Thursday, October 23, 2014

The forthcoming issue of Strategic Alliance Magazine takes an in-depth look at the changing role of the channel manager in today’s high tech industry—a business landscape that can look very much like the 100-foot North Atlantic waves in the movie “The Perfect Storm.”  

 

“Many seasoned channel managers have remarked that while disruptive technologies come and go, they’ve never seen anything quite like this. This disruption goes to the heart of the business model of many technology companies, and those companies and channel managers who don’t adapt are doomed,” writes Norma Watenpaugh, CSAP and principal of Phoenix Consulting Group, in our feature titled “Disrupting the Channel, or: ‘How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Cloud.’”

 

“To succeed, today’s channel executives must become savvy business managers—transitioning to new revenue models, finding new partners, and working collaboratively to understand and serve entirely new groups of customers outside of the information technology (IT) department,” writes Watenpaugh, citing Gartner data documenting “a tectonic shift in IT purchase decision making.” Twelve years ago, spending on IT outside of the IT department was only 20 percent of total technology spending. But by 2019, Gartner says, almost 90 percent of technology will be purchased by business lines, not the IT organization

 

“There are more buyer personas,” explains says Kristina Scott, manager of global channel marketing for Brocade, a data and storage networking company, and corporate member of ASAP. “Customers need the options explained in the language they understand.” Watenpaugh explains, “This means making the translation from technical benefits to business impact. These shifts are leading Brocade and other technology vendors to re-evaluate whether they have the right partners in their channel and what they can offer their current partners to gain new skills.”

 

Channel managers today increasingly must become savvy business managers who understand not just innovative and disruptive technologies, but also adaptive business models. Watenpaugh talks to IDC’s Steve White, program director of the Strategic Alliances Leadership Council at IDC, who says, “There are no rules! And failure doesn’t matter.” Reaction speed does matter, though. “Demand can be gone before you have all the planning done.”

 

Watenpaugh notes that the traditional start-up partnering model was to associate with big brand names to build credibility with customers. “Today, that may be a disadvantage,” according to White. “It is more important to find a likeminded partner with some synergy in the partnering opportunity and just go. Have some success or, if you fail, fail fast and move on.”

 

Learn more in the forthcoming Q4 2014 issue of Strategic Alliance Magazine, available as a free benefit to all ASAP members.

Tags:  Brocade  channel manager  Gartner  IDC  Kristina Scott  Norma Watenpaugh  Phoenix Consulting Group  Steve White  Strategic Alliance Magazine 

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