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ASAP Summit Spotlight Leadership Forum Highlights Exceptional Contributions: Part 3—From Great Platforms to Epiphanies

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Thursday, August 17, 2017
Updated: Tuesday, August 15, 2017

The following is a continuation from Part 2 of the ASAP Summit Spotlight Leadership Forum Q&A Panel session, which took place last March at the 2017 ASAP Global Alliance Summit “Profit, Innovation, and Value for the Part­nering Enterprise,” held in San Diego, Calif. Highlighted on the podium for their exceptional company contributions were Celine Schillinger of Sanofi Pasteur; Chris Haskell of Bayer; Maria Olson of NetApp; and Kevin Hickey of BeyondTrust. The session was moderated by John W. DeWitt, CEO of JW DeWitt Business Communications and publisher and editor of ASAP Media and Strategic Alliance Magazine.  After DeWitt finished his questions, the audience jumped in with their own, one of which is included at the end of this post. 

Describe the greatest epiphany of your career, something that changed your worldview and made you a better executive or leader.

Maria: This was definitely an epiphany: I started working in the supply chain and felt like I was always in the trunk and someone else was driving. I wanted to get in the car. I had more value to give. I then tried product management and was lucky to work for a small division in telecom. I felt like a high tech janitor. And when you try to do everything, you don’t really do anything right to some degree. But in the end, that was all great training ground. My most challenging job, the one I didn’t like the most, was the most beneficial.

Chris: When you do the drug discovery business, 20 to 30 new drugs are approved each year. The more I stepped back, the more I realized my passion was about connecting and empowering rather than being an adventurer and discoverer. I began looking for ways to impact the company, writing strategies on how to create this hub, referring to how to move things along. And advancing the technology to beat cancer I get such joy out of being part of that.

Kevin: I worked for IBM and became one of the glorified gophers for the chairman’s office. Years later, I was sitting in a boardroom seeing a patient system that was broken. It was just so bad. It was a great and fabulous company, but at that point, I realized I wanted to go somewhere smaller.

Maria, FlexPod is a platform. Solutions die very quickly. You created a platform that was able to evolve, and you won an ASAP award several years ago because you took the time to get it right.

Maria: At NetApp, we do it similarly to what Kevin has described [see Part 2 of this blog series]. We step back, ask “what is the value we are delivering,” and hold ourselves to a higher level of thinking.

Celine: I would advocate to go faster and refrain from overthinking. In pharma, every step becomes huge and complicated. It’s as if it feeds itself with its own complexity. We spend more time building than actually doing it. It’s important to realize when perfection is needed, and when it is not.

Audience question from Luna of Belgium: How do you organize this? I understand that purpose, mastery, and a sense of perfection need to be everywhere. But do you create mastery throughout the organization, or do you create the silo for really good professionals? What is the tradeoff between mastery and autonomy? The silo is so natural for pharma.

Chris: Bayer went through a transformation of its alliance structure years ago. There are other parts of the organization in alliance management, and now we are starting to develop best practices and work with them. There are different frameworks within the organization. We’ve also started talking about rolling out trainings that we think are valuable for this transformation.

Maria: I work for companies where alliances are spread out, corporate strategic alliances are all over the map. HP brought the question to a leadership council and surveyed top strategic alliances. At the end of the day, [leadership recognized that] we need to stop having four to five people calling us from your company, and the decision they made was to pick new patterns from a management standpoint. It’s very different to manage everything strategically.

Kevin: It shouldn’t just be executives making decisions. You want to find the right people who have a great viewpoint, such as a systems engineer, and you pull them in. You need to find the knowledge workers to help your collaboration. You have to find the right people. Executives are not looking at all of the details every day.

Celine: There’s often a long debate in companies about quality belonging to the quality department. Actually, quality belongs to everyone who wants to own it. Co-create the purpose. It’s attractive to be co-owned. Anyone who feels they can contribute to the way we work is welcome. Boundaries become less important. What is important is how motivated and connected people are in the organization. Instead of appointing teams, we called for volunteers and asked why they wanted to lead the change initiative. We ended up with a team of 25. The jury, which is made up of half volunteers and half leaders, needed to focus on emotional intelligence and a willingness to help. It’s a peer-to-peer network. People want to make a difference. When you tap into this pool, you achieve miracles.

This concludes ASAP Media’s three-blog series covering the Spotlight Leadership Forum Q&A. You can read Part 1 and Part 2 here.  http://membersstrategicalliances.site-ym.com/blogpost/1143942/ASAP-Blog

Tags:  alliances  Bayer  BeyondTrust  Celine Schillinger  Chris Haskell  frameworks  Kevin Hickey  Maria Olson  NetApp  network  product management  Sanofi Pasteur  strategic alliances 

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ASAP Summit Spotlight Leadership Forum Highlights Exceptional Contributions: Part 2—Building Better Company Culture Through Collaboration

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Wednesday, August 16, 2017
Updated: Tuesday, August 15, 2017

The following is a continuation from Part 1 of the Spotlight Leadership Forum Q&A Panel session, which took place last March at the 2017 ASAP Global Alliance Summit “Profit, Innovation, and Value for the Part­nering Enterprise,” held at the San Diego Marriott Mission Valley, San Diego, California. Highlighted on the podium for their exceptional company contributions were Celine Schillinger of Sanofi Pasteur; Chris Haskell of Bayer; Maria Olson of NetApp; and Kevin Hickey of BeyondTrust. The session was moderated by John W. DeWitt, CEO of JW DeWitt Business Communications and publisher and editor of ASAP Media and Strategic Alliance Magazine, who plied the panel in this with questions on how to build better company culture and frameworks through partnering.

Kevin, when did that [collaboration] light bulb go off for you, or did you always get it? And as an chief executive, how do you drive your company to be more collaborative and successful in partnering?

Kevin: BeyondTrust is made up of nine different businesses. When we came in [to manage the newly combined companies], they had their own system. Our objective was to build the culture on the values we have, and determine what the benefits of the values are and the outcomes. … We tried to get everyone singing out of the same hymnals. We needed structural change, but it really was about culture, and it worked its way down. When we went forward, it was not just a “rah-rah” kick off. It’s was all about communications and driving it throughout the organization.

Maria: The executive team sets the culture of the organization. When I started at HP, it was very collaborative and had a consensus orientation. When I fast forward to some other companies I’ve been to, and it was command and control. The top-level team does set the tone. “Selective collaborations” is what I call it.

You also talked a lot about sales, Kevin. In highly competitive sales environments, there are big challenges. How do you change thought there?

Kevin: You need open communications and clear expectations with everyone in the organization. I don’t care what position you are in the company, if you don’t know how your job affects the company, it needs to start there. You have to be very collaborative, but at some point in time you have to say, “The train is leaving.” Smart people want to get to a decision and move on. Smart people say, if we make a mistake, we will own up to it, adjust, and move forward.

Celine: It’s the paradoxical junction between collaboration and performance via the carrot and stick. We put people in boxes, and it’s crazy. At the same time, research shows people are motived by autonomy, mastery, and purpose. So how do we try to evolve our company’s performance management system? Because of this desire for control, it infiltrates every function other than HR. If we can’t change that, how can we inspire people? How can we cope with the way organizations manage people and also focus attention on something elsethe excitement, the journey, etcetera. It’s not black and white, it’s complicated.

What are some of the strategies you deal with in terms of the need for speed, the need to have deliberation, to not be reactive. How can you balance that today?

Kevin: Sometimes you have to go slower to go faster. You want process. I do find that as a company, you’ll see the people who are doing the rework all the time. To me, you have to guide people to slow down and think about what they are trying to accomplish. All the mistakes I made when I went into partnering in the channel alliance business, it was a quick fix. It really takes thoughtful collaborating up front with people who have done it to get 85 percent of a plan agreed to. It will save you a ton of time on the back end.

For Part 1 in this series, please go here: http://www.strategic-alliances.org/blogpost/1143942/282809/ASAP-Summit-Spotlight-Leadership-Forum-Highlights-Exceptional-Contributions-Part-1-Inspiring-a-Movement-for-Change-Within-Your-Company . ASAP Media’s coverage of the Spotlight Leadership Forum Q&A continues in Part 3.

Tags:  BeyondTrust  Celine Schillinger  collaborations  collaborative  communications  Kevin Hickey  Maria Olson  NetApp  Sanofi Pasteur  strategies 

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How BeyondTrust’s Partnering Strategy Accelerates Growth into New Markets amidst Increasing Cyber Attacks

Posted By Genevieve Fraser, Thursday, March 23, 2017

Today’s headlines are a cautionary reminder of the increasing need for effective cybersecurity. Kevin Hickey, president and CEO of BeyondTrust,  reminded the audience of that fact as he took center stage during the March 1 Leadership Spotlight plenary session at the 2017 ASAP Global Alliance Summit, “Profit, Innovation, and Value for the Partnering Enterprise,” at the San Diego Marriott Mission Valley, San Diego, California.  His talk, “Leveraging Partners to Accelerate Growth and Enter New Markets,” built upon his extensive C-suite background in cybersecurity, vulnerability management, mission critical applications, and IT services at companies such as E-Eye Digital Security, Netpro, Homebid, and Viasoft, Inc.  

“In B2B software, the old perpetual model was to pay for a license and maintenance, and each year you’d put together a business plan to grow the top line. Now, in the privileged account management market, you need to think ‘Snowden’ and how to stop him,” he said.

Hickey’s remarks were made as one who is well aware of the dangers lurking inside and outside a company’s cyber walls. BeyondTrust is a cybersecurity company dedicated to proactively eliminating data breaches from insider privilege abuse and external hacking attacks. During Hickey’s nearly five-year tenure as president and CEO, the company has maintained significant growth rates and profitability, expanding to more than 400 employees and serving over 4,000 customers worldwide.

But emerging customer awareness of unprecedented cybersecurity threats and demand for vulnerability management is no guarantee for success in the field. “Today, the competition is very intense. And, yes, you can sign up lots of partners, but how do you differentiate between partners? What are the variables? You need to think it through and make sure the team fully understands. It requires constant educationweeklyso they do understand,” he maintains.

“For us, it’s not just about what we want to do, and where we are weak, and if you grew 35 percent. That’s great to know. But how do you continue to grow? It’s important to not only look at yourselves but what others have done. Look to those models. What did they do to be successful? You need to really understand your community, what's happening and how to assess it,” he continued. “To be successful, you must have tech partners that are tightly integrated. The question you must ask is, ‘What's in it for everyone?’ Then you need to map it out for folks.”

Put together a franchise kit, he then advised. Make sure the education is crisp and concise. Start small and expand. “You might be the one chasing them more often than not, but get them engaged. If there’s a problem, is it fixable or do we move on? Develop a shared expectation piece where it becomes evident what needs to be done to move forward. Start small, and publicize the hell out of it. Then others will want to play,” he concluded.

Tags:  Accelerate Growth  alliance manangement  B2B software  BeyondTrust  C-suite  IT services  Kevin Hickey  Leveraging Partners  New Markets  Summit Leadership Spotlight 

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