My Profile   |   Print Page   |   Contact Us   |   Sign In   |   Register
ASAP Blog
Blog Home All Blogs
Welcome to ASAP Blog, the best place to stay current regarding upcoming events, member companies, the latest trends, and leaders in the industry. Blogs are posted at least once a week; members may subscribe to receive notifications when new blogs are posted by clicking the "Subscribe" link above.

 

Search all posts for:   

 

Top tags: alliance management  alliances  collaboration  partnering  alliance  alliance managers  partners  partner  alliance manager  partnerships  ecosystem  The Rhythm of Business  partnership  Jan Twombly  governance  biopharma  Eli Lilly and Company  Vantage Partners  Strategic Alliance Magazine  IBM  IoT  ASAP BioPharma Conference  strategy  healthcare  NetApp  2015 ASAP Global Alliance Summit  Christine Carberry  Cisco  cloud  communication 

Partnering Superheroes | Who Better to Combine Collaborative Leadership Skills with Strategic Vision and Ride Them All the Way to the C-Suite?

Posted By Mike Leonetti, CSAP, Friday, April 17, 2020

Superhero movies are definitely, as the kids say, “a thing.” They’re fun and exciting, a great way to liven up a long winter night. But do superheroes really exist, and could they have any relevance for us in terms of business strategy? I didn’t think so, but recently I was part of three conversations that changed my mind.

 

First, I spoke with Elizabeth Gazda, CEO of Embr Labs, in anticipation of her upcoming Leadership Forum talk at the ASAP Global Alliance Summit. Embr Labs makes a wearable bracelet that can raise or lower your skin temperature to help with stress reduction and anxiety and improve sleep and focus. Before joining Embr, Liz cofounded a fintech and a music technology startup, and worked at some of Boston’s first “unicorns,” like ATG and m-Qube.

 

Liz made the point that the collaborative leadership and critical thinking skills needed in the C-suite are very close to those of the alliance management competency profile. Liz believes partnering “superheroes” can and should be showcased in their organizations as potential future CEOs. In her view, alliance management is the perfect preparation for executive leadership, especially as more and more companies undergo digital transformation via partnerships and seek to nurture and reward collaborative entrepreneurial excellence.

 

A second conversation took place in early February in Boston, at an ASAP New England chapter meeting whose theme was “Taking the Next Step: Critical Skills for Aspiring Alliance Executives and Organizational Leaders.” Moderated by Mai-Tal Kennedy of Vantage Partners, the discussion featured panelists Lou Shipley, former CEO of Black Duck Software and a lecturer at Harvard Business School and MIT; Christine Carberry, CSAP, board member at the UNH Entrepreneurship Center; and Andrew Hirsch, CFO and head of corporate development for Agios Pharmaceuticals.

 

All of them highlighted both the difficult job alliance managers have and its relevance for future career success. Lou in particular noted the number of alliance management “superstars” at his previous organization, including one who combined the roles of alliance management, business development, and investment banking expertise—superhero skills indeed. This individual directed the ultimate spinoff of the company and saved it close to $10 million. How’s that for adding value?

 

The third conversation was Jay McBain’s January 30 ASAP webinar, “Top 10 Channel and Alliances Predictions for 2020.” This presentation, an outgrowth of Jay’s influential research for Forrester, highlighted key trends affecting not only the tech world but most industries, as nearly every company, he says, is fast becoming a technology company. (See our cover story in Strategic Alliance Quarterly on ecosystems, for more of Jay’s and other experts’ timely insights and analysis of this exploding phenomenon.)

 

Among these trends is what Jay calls the “trifurcation” of the IT indirect sales channel into an influencer channel, the familiar transactional channel, and a retention channel. He noted too that with such heavyweights as Microsoft and Salesforce bringing hundreds or thousands of new partners into their ecosystems every month, a great partner experience is quickly becoming as important as a great customer experience when companies look strategically to their future.

 

With this heightened awareness of the interrelated issues of customer and partner experience—especially the complex retention phase—how are we going to manage all these relationships and ecosystems? What sort of superheroes will be needed to lead behemoths like Microsoft, Google, Salesforce, IBM, and others into the partnering-everywhere world?

 

I think you know the answer. Who better than alliance professionals? As Jay said, they’re the ones with the right résumé to be ecosystem managers and orchestrators—not only in IT, but in biopharma, manufacturing, consumer goods, and across industries. These partnering specialists, collaboration leaders, and strategic visionaries have the capabilities, the skills, and the superhero savvy to get it done—the same attributes that make them ideal candidates for the C-suite.

 

So what’s holding us back? Despite an abundance of evidence, not enough companies have grasped the full implications. I see many organizations focused on the transaction—and not applying partnering best practice in the retention phase of sales partnerships. As Jay argues, some of them—even among the Fortune 500—will end up losers, sticking their heads in the sand and refusing to adapt to an oncoming future where customer satisfaction is increasingly delivered through a great partner experience (Px).

 

Alliance professionals can make Px a reality right now. The lessons of past partnership failures should be enough to rally today’s C-suite leaders to seek success in the massive partnerships their organizations will undertake. In addition, organizations must begin grooming their best alliance managers for the C-suite and other positions of leadership in the future—even as they’re employing them for partner and customer retention in the present. We have the tools, the skills, and the people to get the job done; what’s needed is a true focus and consensus that partnerships are difficult and require best practices and trained professionals to make them successful. That and a hardy band of partnering superheroes—with or without the cape.

Tags:  alliance professionals  Black Duck Software  Christine Carberry  collaborative leaders  c-Suite  ecosystem  Elizabeth Gazda  Embr Labs  Google  Harvard Business School  IBM  Jay McBain  Lou Shipley  Mai-Tal Kennedy  Microsoft  MIT  partnerships  Salesforce  UNH Entrepreneurship Cen  Vantage Partners 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

ASAP BioPharma Conference Keynoter Dr. Sam Nussbaum: ’An Industry under Siege Must Take on a Different Social Contract’

Posted By John W. DeWitt, Wednesday, October 5, 2016

A couple of weeks ago, renowned physician Dr. Samuel Nussbaum—who served as chief medical officer for Anthem through 16 years of dramatic change in the healthcare industry—took the stage at the Sept. 7-9, 2016 ASAP BioPharma Conference in Boston with a big grin, twinkling eyes, and an embrace of new ASAP Chairman Brooke Paige. Paige introduced Dr. Nussbaum and noted that speaking in Boston was a homecoming for “America’s Physician,” who trained in internal medicine at Massachusetts General and then in endocrinology at Harvard. Indeed, Nussbaum, who is now strategic consultant for EGB Advisors, paid homage to the Boston and Cambridge, Mass., area’s medical science history and still-expanding potential for academic partnerships.

“One only has to go a few blocks west of here to see where Merck began to work with Harvard; Novartis has a research center near MIT in Cambridge,” Nussbaum noted. Then he turned serious. “It’s great to be here,” he began, “but it’s also an extraordinary time in healthcare, an industry, a space, under siege. It’s no longer fully understandable to say we discover, we cure, we make health better for the world. One has to take on a different social contract … and drive collaboration.”

Nussbaum echoed Dickens’ famous description of the Elizabethan era in England.

“We live at a time which is unprecedented. It’s the best of times, because we are in an age of unprecedented advances in medical technology and human science, yet it’s the worst of times, because we have a healthcare system in the US and around the world that doesn’t provide access for everyone. The state of public health is not a focus; the quality of medical care doesn’t keep pace with the science. Looking back to halcyon days, we had a great healthcare system [in the US] and research leading to some of the most extraordinary advances in healthcare. Yet we have storm clouds on the horizon.”

Nussbaum discussed a variety of driving forces vs. restraining forces

  • Breakthrough science vs. affordability for government and private payers
  • Personalized medicine vs. reputation issues
  • Technology, big data, bioinformatics vs. value-based payment models, bundled payment
  • Patient-centered outcomes and clinical design vs. impact of consolidation

He juxtaposed several triumphs of modern medicine with what has become a key factor in recent news coverage of the pharma industry and in the run-up to 2016 US presidential election.

“Cardiac death rates dramatically reduced. Antiviral drugs transform HIV into a chronic illness vs. a killer. And screening and better drugs improve cancer survival. But there is anger, there is outrage,” over high-profile drug price increases in the US and lack of access in other places in the world. “Why are people so angry? Because they can’t afford, and as nations, we can’t afford, the cost of healthcare,” he said. “Over the last decade, the average US family wage hasn’t changed much—from $49,309 to $53,800. Why the movement to Sanders or Trump? Capitalizing on outrage.”

He further explained the context of this outrage—and why expanded coverage (in Massachusetts and across the US under Obama’s Affordable Care Act) hasn’t been the cure-all for healthcare in the US.

“Massachusetts was the first state to have universal coverage. It was done under ‘Romney Care,’ similar to ‘Obamacare,” he said. The problem? “In Massachusetts, healthcare costs went up $5.1 billion and everyone applauded that type of access. But look what happened to other essential services: public health spending down 40 percent; mental health spending down 33 percent, etc.” In other words, Nussbaum explained, “We stole from what are called the social determinants of health. We know that education and housing leads to better health and better health outcomes,” while costing less. In other words, prevention costs much less than the healthcare cure.

“More importantly,” Nussbaum continued, “we are not using our $3.2 billion wisely—30-40 percent of healthcare spending is wasted on unnecessary services, administrative costs, prices, fraud. This is what we have to contend with. That’s why it is about collaboration, why it is the focus of the Obama administration, and of private business, to introduce reforms.”

Don’t miss “Dr. Sam Nussbaum: Healing the US Healthcare System One Politician at a Time,” my colleague Genevieve Fraser’s previous blog coverage of Dr. Nussbaum’s keynote address

Tags:  Anthem  ASAP BioPharma Conference  big data  bioinformatics  Brooke Paige  bundled payment  Dr. Samuel Nussbaum  driving forces vs. restraining forces  EGB Advisors  Harvard  healthcare  Merck  MIT  Novartis  Personalized medicine  reputation issues  Technology  value-based payment models 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Q&A Preview with Dr. Robert Langer

Posted By Rebekah L. Fraser, Tuesday, July 22, 2014
Updated: Monday, July 21, 2014
Renowned professor, chemical and biomedical engineer, and inventor Dr. Robert Langer will be one of the keynote speakers at this year’s BioPharma Conference. In a recent phone conversation, he shared his experiences with alliances as well as the motivations behind his numerous achievements.  Below is a preview of an article that will appear in August eNews.  All ASAP members receive eNews monthly as part of their member benefits.

RLF:    You’re one of the keynote speakers at the Association of Strategic Alliance Professionals’ BioPharma conference
this September. What do you find compelling about this opportunity?

Langer:

I see it as an excellent opportunity to get across the science that we’re doing and the good that we’re doing to an outstanding group of people.

 

RLF:    Langer labs has partnered with the military, major non-profit foundations, and private industry. What have you learned via these alliances? Have you found any one type of partnership found more valuable?

 

Langer:         

All of these alliances have been useful, they’ve all enabled us to take important scientific ideas, move them forward, in many cases creating products that are helping millions of people. Have I found one type of partnership more valuable? I think they’ve all been valuable, so it’s hard for me to say what’s most valuable. The things that give us longest term funding and most money enable us to do more. 

Tags:  2014 ASAP BioPharma Conference  David H. Koch Institute Professor  Dr. Robert Langer  Langer labs  Massachusetts Institute of Technology  MIT 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 
For more information email us at info@strategic-alliances.org or call +1-781-562-1630