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Discovery across Sectors—and Generations

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Monday, July 8, 2019

Academic Partnering Gives Industry a Chance to Magnify Discovery—and Foster the Personal and Career Growth of Millennials

 

One of the benefits of academic collaboration is that industry has the opportunity to foster the personal and career growth of millennials. The academic collaboration article in Strategic Alliance Magazine highlights the Johns Hopkins University-MedImmune Scholars Program. We need more of these types of academic collaborations to support innovation, and also the young minds so eager to engage in finding the next great breakthrough for society. During an ASAP Global Alliance Summit Keynote Speaker Alex Dickinson, senior vice president of strategic initiatives at Illumina, has pointed out, innovation has the power to lead to the end of disease. Are we ready for that kind of transformation?

 

I was reminded of the need to find ways that industry can engage millennials in innovation when my daughter and I swapped articles over the weekend. A technology buff with a gift for writing, she was interested in the advances and inventions noted at the beginning of the academic collaboration cover story. She also found the accompanying interview with Star Trek: The Next Generation writer and gaming aficionado Lee Sheldon intriguing, because he instructs a generation of millennials born and bred on futuristic worlds where technology can teach the joy of progress through teamwork and collaboration.

 

As I looked over my daughter’s essay, I marveled at how our work intertwined. She had selected the theme of “discovery” for this semester’s English class with the task of relating it to each book she reads. Her assignment was to relate discovery to Ayn Rand’s Anthem. My assignment for this issue of the magazine was to probe the value of discovery in relation to academic collaboration and industry.

 

“Discovery’s everywhere. It is fueled by the desire to learn and demands the yearning to grow. The uncovering of a new fascination is the manifestation of discovery. This love for learning is cherished and leads one to bigger and larger opportunities for growth; for without discovery one would not be introduced to areas where growth is needed,” she wrote. “Anthem brings to light the impact of discovery in societies, and shows that without it, one cannot advance or improve.”

 

The protagonist in Anthem is Equality 7-2521, an intelligent, non-conforming thinker who has been relegated to the career of street sweeping. Educating himself secretly by candlelight, he reinvents electricity during a moment of inspiration. Electricity was banned to keep the masses under control, but Equality 7-2521 realizes the revolutionary potential of his discovery if turned into an invention and manufactured because it would make life easier and also could foster other inventions, furthering societal growth. He takes the reinvention to the World Council of Scholars, the so-called greatest thinkers from around the world. But the government system has sapped them of their creativity, consensus-building, and collaborative abilities on even the simplest of innovations. Equality 7-2521 is then punished for his efforts to think out of the box and runs away.

 

“Discovery is the secret ingredient for the progression of a person or society. Without discovery, there would not be the realization that there could or needs to be improvement,” my daughter concluded. “The challenge to break free from other’s restrictions or our own is a daily struggle. When we transcend personal limitation and government obstruction, our capability to grow increases.”

 

While innovation needs some government limitations in place, such as safety and ethical guidelines, excessive restriction goes against the grain in human nature, as my daughter points out. Discovery, innovation, and manufacturing are an innate and necessary component of a healthy society. Clearly, academia is a seedbed for ideas. If nurtured properly with appropriate creative and financial resources, and combined with collaborative zeal, it can result in a cornucopia of benefits to industry and society. Many millennials are waiting in the wings for the opportunity to engage in discovery provided by a well-designed industry-academic program. It’s well worth considering as part of your overall alliance management strategy. 

Tags:  Collaboration  Forward Thinking  Millennials  Strategic Alliances  Technological Benefits 

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Millennials, Entrepreneurs, and the Push and Pull of the Crowd—an Interview with Lorin Coles (Part Two)

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Monday, January 22, 2018
Updated: Friday, January 19, 2018

During a recent interview for the Q4 2017 Strategic Alliance Magazine, I spoke with Lorin Coles, CSAP, CEO and managing director of Alliancesphere, an alliance management and collaboration consulting business, on the topics of innovation, out-of-the-box thinking, and creativity in business partnering (see “Giving Birth to Innovation: The Brainchild of Out-of-the-Box Thinking”). Coles had many insightful and inspiring ideas on the topic, and due to limited space, some of these ideas didn’t make it into the magazine.

Following is Part Two of our two-part blog post based on additional materials from the interview with Coles. We pick up the story of The Coca-Cola Company, which as looking to build joint, adjacent business models and innovation practices, and how Coles and the American Israeli Chamber of Commerce began working with Coke’s chief innovation officer across the brands to on a trip to Israel.

Coles: Israel is sometimes called “the start-up nation.” Tel Aviv feels like a combination of New York, Los Angeles, and Silicon Valley. People there have this belief that anything is possible, and it’s very contagious. They are not trying to do incremental innovation. They are trying to do breakthroughs. We put together meetings there with universities, venture capitalists, governments, entrepreneurs, and the incubator system. So everyone was well prepared with the kinds of things Coca-Cola was looking for to innovate. Coca-Cola already had a strong bottler in Israel but did not have a company-to-country innovation model. All kinds of deals and R&D came out of that. On the tech side, Weizmann Institute, Tel Aviv University, and the Volcani Institute ended up signing big agreements. Coca-Cola ended up creating a partnership with venture capital firms on the supply chain side. They created BRIDGE, and started looking at Israel from the tech, Internet, retail, and consumer side. It went from ingredients, supply chain, and water to information technology. That model has now been replicated around the world, including in China—both BRIDGE and an innovation hub were created. For me, all this falls under the umbrella of collaborative innovation, which involves collaborating and innovating differently by setting up hubs where certain parts of the world have capabilities.

The Crowd Factor
From the 1980s until now, I can track every big wave from a tech innovation standpoint. Over the past 40 years, the one thing I found was that every time disruptive tech occurred—you have the disruptor versus who is being affected—the leaders resist the change. They try their best, but in the end, the market wins. The customer is pulling it because:

  1. The experience is better.
  2. A network of ecosystem applications is built and driven around the change (the PC revolution and client server system drove it for many years, then mobile tech).
  3. Open systems, standards, and the market pull it (consider Über, it’s simpler and better than getting a taxi, it’s ubiquitous).

Read Part One of this blog for more insights from Lorin Coles, CSAP, and see ASAP Media’s in-depth interviews with Coles and other out-of-the-box thinkers in the Q4 2017 issue of Strategic Alliance Magazine.

Tags:  alliances  Alliancesphere  BRIDGE  collaboration  critical partnering  ecosystems  Entrepreneurial Innovation  Gen X  incubator system  innovation hub  lifecycle  Lorin Coles  Millennials  Strategic Alliance Magazine  supply chain 

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Millennials, Entrepreneurs, and the Push and Pull of the Crowd—an Interview with Lorin Coles (Part One)

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Friday, January 19, 2018

During a recent interview for the Q4 2017 Strategic Alliance Magazine, I spoke with Lorin Coles, CSAP, CEO and managing director of Alliancesphere, an alliance management and collaboration consulting business, on the topics of innovation, out-of-the-box thinking, and creativity in business partnering (see “Giving Birth to Innovation: The Brainchild of Out-of-the-Box Thinking Magazine”). Coles had many insightful and inspiring ideas on the topic, and due to limited space, some of these ideas didn’t make it into the magazine. Following is Part One of a two-part blog post based on additional materials from the interview.

The Cusp of Change
Coles: Today, it’s the most exciting time I’ve ever seen. Building the solutions and go-to-market has evolved because there are so many different routes to market to create that customer experience. So much has to do with digital technology—a lot of it is the leading edge. Also, crossing from the innovators to early adopters—we definitely have worked in many companies along that lifecycle. The market is at the point where they know how critical partnering, collaboration, and ecosystems are. Companies are all trying to figure out how to partner with tech companies in cross-industry partnering with three, four, five multiple companies at once to create a partnership.

The Influence of Gen X
The depth and breadth of partnering is so different, and I think we’re going to see a big change in the market: Clearly, the workplace is changing with millennials. They are moving up in the management structure, changing the makeup, and understand tech and partnering. People in their 40’s are now becoming leaders of companies. That group understands more intuitively. Another factor has to do with operating in a global landscape, where some cultures are more inherently collaborative. Also, the role of women in leadership—they are more open to collaboration. Finally, the Cloud—because of mobility and the Cloud and what is possible, tech is not sitting in the basement anymore. Uber, airbnb, artificial intelligence—all of these next-generation ideas are absolutely going to create business opportunities and a better world. 

Entrepreneurial Innovation
In 1999, I got involved with an organization in Atlanta—The American Israeli Chamber of Commerce. The Coca-Cola Company was looking to build joint, adjacent business models and innovation practices. We started working with the chief innovation officer across the brands, and we put together a trip to Israel. There were three core things Coca-Cola was trying to innovate around:

  • brands or products
  • capabilities: anything up and down that valley chain, such as technology, processes, ingredients, or science
  • packaging: an important part of fast-moving consumer goods companies

Before we went, we looked at four areas of innovation: Water, energy, ingredients, and the supply chain. I went to Coca-Cola before heading to Israel and gathered the problems and consumer and business challenges in those four areas.

Learn more about the story of Coca-Cola, Israel, and innovation in Part Two of this blog sharing more of ASAP Media’s conversation on out-of-the-box thinking with Lorin Coles, CSAP, CEO of Alliancesphere. 

Tags:  alliances  Alliancesphere  collaboration  critical partnering  ecosystems  Entrepreneurial Innovation  Gen X  lifecycle  Lorin Coles  Millennials  Strategic Alliance Magazine  supply chain 

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Fall 2016 SAM: New Frontiers in Academic Alliances; Interview with a Star Trek Writer and Gaming Professor; the Need to Think ‘Bigger than your Biggest Partner;’ and Much More!

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Tuesday, December 20, 2016

The Fall Strategic Alliance Magazine delves into several new frontiers in alliance management. This issue stretches both imagination and potential with a cover story on academic partnering, “Bringing Academia aboard the Enterprise.” The article explores the history of invention in academia and then shifts to the driving forces today that are making academia an increasingly desirable partner, and how to maximize the potential.

 

Readers are also treated to an interview with Professor Lee Sheldon, a former writer for “Star Trek: The Next Generation” and several other well-known Hollywood television series, on creating collaboratively.  Now a professor of practice in interactive media and game development at Worcester Polytechnic Institute in Worcester, Massachusetts, Sheldon believes that “bad teams are the ones that cannot communicate and can’t get past their position.”  The better teams “communicate and understand and respect the positions of others outside of their own areas of expertise,” and every challenge can be met by a game.

 

This issue’s Collaborative Buzz highlights innovative partnering and provides a peek into the topic for next spring’s 2017 Global Alliances Summit, “From Science Fiction to Reality,” by Illumina Innovator Alex Dickinson.

 

In his Up Front column “Gaining a Global Perspective,” ASAP CEO Michael Leonetti, CSAP, emphasizes the importance of a global perspective so essential today for alliance managers as he reflects on the programming from the recent ASAP European Alliance Summit. The “diversity of nations and industries,” and nearly double the attendance, provide a launching pad for his thoughts on how to lead with a winning formula: “Think bigger than your biggest partner—and communicate the value on that level,” he writes. Leonetti also integrates some ideas from the recent leadership forum at the 2016 ASAP Biopharma Conference. Speaking of which, there’s a recap is this issue of the conference that covers the wide range of interactive sessions and dynamic participants this year.

 

Dip into the “Your Career” column for some practical insight from by Eric Rosenson, senior vice president of talent acquisition at Ruderfer & Associates, and Greg Flanagan, president and founder of Emerging Healthcare Partners. John DeWitt writes about how these two search professionals challenge, enlighten, and provoke alliance executives “out of any complacency they might have about career advancement” as well as discussed valuable topics such as “transferrable skillsets—negotiation skills, knowledge of partnership from a business development and sales organization perspec­tive, and other capabilities that are commonly sought in alliance managers.”

 

The Member Spotlight shines on cybersecurity corporate member BeyondTrust in Genevieve Fraser’s interview with Joe Schramm, vice president of strategic alliances. Keys to successful partnering include treating the “partner’s win as sacred,” says Schramm in an interview that looks at the major areas of competition in cybersecurity and how strategic alliances accelerate growth and provide leverage, among other things.

 

Eli Lilly and Company is offering from its alliance management and business training kitchen another recipe for success. Their editorial supplement instructs on how to enhance the flavor and value of an alliance “tossed salad” by adding lean six sigma to improve methodologies, speed, and quality while reducing costs.

 

Finally, The Close explores the relationship between discovery and progress, and highlights an alliance between MedImmune and Johns Hopkins that has resulted in an innovative program that could provide a role model for industry. The program enlists the young minds of millennials “so eager to engage in finding the next great breakthrough for society,” writes Cynthia B. Hanson. “Many millennials are waiting in the wings for the opportunity to engage in discovery provided by a well-designed industry-academic program. It’s well worth considering as part of your overall alliance management strategy,” she points out.

Tags:  2016 ASAP BioPharma Conference  Academic Alliances  accelerate growth  alliances  ASAP European Alliance Summit  BeyondTrust  business development  Eli Lilly and Company  Illumina  industry-academic  Joe Schramm  Johns Hopkins  methodologies  MidImmune  millennials  negotiation skills  Partner  partners  partnership 

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