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ASAP Welcomes New Board Members

Posted By Michael J. Burke, Friday, August 21, 2020

ASAP is extremely pleased to announce the appointment of four new members to its board of directors in recent months.

The new ASAP board members are: Kriti Kapoor, former head of social media and online communities, customer service and support at Microsoft and currently the founder of Automation Ready Inc.; Knut Sturmhoefel, CA-AM, vice president and global head of alliance management at Novartis; and Sally Wang, group vice president, global alliances and partnerships at International SOS. In addition, within the past six months Lucinda (Cindy) Warren, vice president of Janssen business development, neuroscience, for Janssen Business Development/Johnson & Johnson Innovation, has also joined the ASAP board.

“We’re very excited to have Kriti, Knut, and Sally join Cindy and our excellent group of board members as our newest additions to ASAP’s board of directors,” said Michael Leonetti, CSAP, president and CEO of ASAP. “They truly enhance and diversify the depth and breadth of experience we have on our outstanding board of directors, and they bring a wealth of knowledge and expertise to the association which I know will help us immeasurably as we move forward into the future, with all the challenges of these times. I expect they can help us by serving on some of our board’s standing committees, such as membership, finance, and editorial, and through their financial and operational oversight, including approval of the association’s annual budget. And most of all, they’ll come to the table with fresh thinking and new ideas, and we’ll reap the benefits of their experience and knowledge as they contribute to the ongoing governance, growth, and success of ASAP.”

Kriti Kapoor’s long tech career includes stints at Microsoft, HP, and the hypergrowth automation startup UiPath. In her technology marketing and customer care leadership roles, she’s been a builder of online communities and diverse, high-performing teams, not only in the US but in Asia Pacific, Japan, and EMEA. She has a proven track record in her career of successfully executing across multiple functions covering customer service, field and regional marketing, product management, and technology sales, driven by data analytics and customer insights and partnerships. Kriti holds an MBA from the London Business School, and a BSc in computer science from the National University of Singapore. She serves as an advisory board member of the CMO Council Asia Pacific, and was an executive sponsor of HP’s Americas Women’s Leadership Council.

Knut Sturmhoefel is vice president and global head of alliance management at Novartis. He has worked in business development at Novartis since 2005, with broad experience in partnering and deal transactions including more than seven years in alliance management. Knut has a background in research and drug development across different therapeutic areas, including immuno-oncology and ophthalmology. He previously worked at the German Cancer Research Center, as Fogarty Fellow at the US National Institutes of Health, and at two biotech companies in the Boston area (Genetics Institute and Lexigen) before joining Novartis in 2002 as a project manager. He earned his PhD in immunology from Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg and holds a master’s certificate in project management from George Washington University.

Sally Wang’s career spans over 20 years in operations, business development, product development, alliance management, and strategy. She currently manages global strategic partnerships for International SOS as group vice president of global alliances and partnerships. Sally works closely with the International SOS senior leadership team and business units globally to identify, develop, and operate critical business relationships to help International SOS grow its capability and global footprint. She and her team manage a portfolio of global partners that includes technology, security, mental health, travel, and professional service companies. She has built a strong partnership division at International SOS, which has been both a winner and a finalist in ASAP’s Alliance Excellence Awards. Sally also advises nonprofit organizations on strategy and partnerships management, and currently serves as vice chair for St. Christopher’s Foundation for Children, an organization in Philadelphia that improves children’s health and dental care through community outreach and education.

Lucinda (Cindy) Warren has been a featured speaker at past ASAP events, including most recently the 2019 ASAP BioPharma Conference and 2019 ASAP European Summit. She heads the Neuroscience Business Development Team at Janssen, which includes scientific finding, licensing transactions, mergers, acquisition, out-licensing, divestitures, and alliance management. With over 24 years of broad industry experience, Cindy began her pharma career in Canada. In 1999, she joined the Johnson & Johnson Family of Companies and has held various US and global roles of increasing responsibility, including sales, marketing, new product development, alliance management, and business development leadership. Just prior to joining the Janssen Business Development Leadership Team, Cindy led the Immunology Business Unit in Australia, returning to the US in 2014 as vice president of alliance management, Janssen, responsible for leading the total pharmaceutical portfolio of collaborations. She received her bachelor of science degree from the University of Alberta, Canada.

As ASAP welcomes these four new board members, we also say goodbye to some longtime ASAP stalwarts who have recently stepped down from the board: Russ Buchanan, CSAP, former vice president of global channel strategy alliances and operations at Xerox and chairman emeritus of ASAP’s board; Donna Peek, CSAP, former vice president of global alliances at Genpact, who steps down as board secretary; and Steve Twait, CSAP, vice president of alliance and integration management at AstraZeneca, who steps aside as board treasurer. We’re very grateful for their service on the board and for all their contributions to ASAP. We wish Russ and Donna all the best in their retirement, and we’re thankful that we’ll continue to have the support and leadership behind the scenes from Steve.

Tags:  ASAP Board of Directors  AstraZeneca  Automation Ready Inc.  Donna Peek  Genpact  International SOS  Janssen Business Development/Johnson & Johnson Inn  Knut Sturmhoefel  Kriti Kapoor  Lucinda (Cindy) Warren  Novartis  Russ Buchanan  Sally Wang  Steve Twait  Xerox 

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Q4 Strategic Alliance Quarterly Sourcing Outtakes: The Power of the First Draft, Ever-Changing Tech Standards, Customers and the Cloud, Value vs. Discounts

Posted By Jon Lavietes, Wednesday, December 11, 2019

In our upcoming issues of Strategic Alliance Monthly and Strategic Alliance Quarterly, we will examine the changing nature of supplier collaborations in today’s business world. In a lengthy feature for Strategic Alliance Quarterly, we dive deep into how advanced digital technologies are transforming sourcing and procurement managers’ jobs such that they now need alliance management skills and practices to effectively carry out their responsibilities. Meanwhile, a feature in our next edition of Strategic Alliance Monthly explores how a company can become a preferred supplier in the eyes of its partner.

As is the case with just about every piece we put together for ASAP’s publications, there were plenty of great insights left over from our interviews with experts from the ASAP community that don’t appear in either article. Here are just a few of those nuggets.

Alliance Agreements and the Power of the Pen

Andrew Eibling, CSAP, vice president of business development and alliance management at Enable Injections, Inc., made it known several times during our conversation that he felt that, in pharma, the procurement division was generally a parking lot for nonstrategic partnerships. In other words, wind up with a procurement manager as your point of contact and odds are that you have almost zero chance of having any real influence over the partner organization’s affairs. In that discussion, Eibling noted that initial contract negotiations offered a sign of how a partner will view your organization and relationship. The goal is to agree on a contract that hews closer to the principles set forth in The ASAP Handbook of Alliance Management rather than a boilerplate supplier agreement, and the best way to ensure this is to compose the first draft for the partner’s review.

“Somebody has the power of the pen. Who drafts the agreement first? Everyone wants to take the first pass because that becomes the substrate you’re going to work from,” said Eibling. He added that an alliance agreement “tends to be more bidirectional versus what we would get from a monodirectional supplier agreement [where] you will do what’s on the schedule according to the terms we agreed to, and that’s that.”

Are We a “Standards Fit”?

An important element to assembling a tech alliance that we didn’t end up exploring in great depth in the feature was the layer of complexity added by the number of disparate standards for emerging technologies, such as cloud and IoT, competing in the marketplace. Companies putting together a smart tractor, for example, have to find partners that are not only a feature/function fit and a cultural fit but also a “standards fit,” so to speak—that is, they base their systems on technical protocols that align with your IT architecture.

“Things are moving so fast. You might get a standard out there and get everybody to adopt it, but then some new technology comes along that disrupts it all. You’ve spent all this money on standardization and it didn’t endure. That’s one of the reasons why, as a supplier, you need to know what your customers’ sourcing strategies are, and if you’re going to be compatible with the direction they are going in,” said Russ Buchanan, CSAP, vice president of strategic alliances at Xerox and ASAP’s chairman emeritus.

As an example, Buchanan talked about how companies that base their technology on proprietary standards want to be sure to avoid getting entwined with organizations that are placing their chips on open source models.

“OK Google: I’m Seeing Other Cloud Companies”

Subhojit Roye, CSAP, vice president and head of alliances at Tech Mahindra Business Services, singled out the three cloud Goliaths—Google, AWS, and Microsoft—as another potential source of complexity in constructing an alliance. One or more of those vendors may pressure the manufacturer to make it the exclusive cloud platform for the new product or service, but in many cases decent portions of the OEM’s customer base may be split among each of the three cloud leaders. The manufacturer can’t risk alienating a portion of its clients. Thus, the sourcing manager may need to stand up to a powerful market mover, something alliance managers have been doing for years.

“Suddenly, if you’re the procurement manager you have to explain to Google, ‘I’m sorry, but customers are demanding that we have to talk with all three companies,’” Roye said.

Don’t Nickel-and-Dime a Valuable Relationship

More than one interviewee stressed that lower prices are no longer the end game for sourcing and procurement managers. Overall value is the buyer’s main goal. Roye explained the situation in greater detail.

“The procurement function is becoming more and more strategic. The chief marketing officer is becoming critical. Chief customer service officer, the head of sales, and the CEO are suddenly banking on the procurement officer to say, ‘Listen, those days are gone. Don’t nickel-and-dime the vendor. Don’t ask him to give us a $10 item for $6. We’d rather get more value for $10. We’d rather pay him $12 to make sure he’s happy with us, he gives us our products on time—we don’t wind up with a screw-up on Thanksgiving or during the winter holidays—or he doesn’t switch at the last minute and go to a competitor.”

Remember, this is just what hit the cutting room floor. Be sure to check out the next issues of Strategic Alliance Monthly and Strategic Alliance Quarterly for more great insights into alliance management vis-à-vis the sourcing and procurement functions in today’s corporate landscape. 

Tags:  alliances  Andrew Eibling  AWS  Cloud  digital technologies  Enable Injections  Google  IoT  Microsoft  procurement  relationship  Russ Buchanan  Sourcing  Strategic Alliance Quarterly  Subhojit Roye  Tech Mahindra Business Services  Tech Standards  transforming sourcing  Value vs. Discounts  Xerox 

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Supplier-User Collaboration Requires More Than Advanced Technology—Alliance Management Is Needed, Too

Posted By Jon Lavietes, Wednesday, November 13, 2019

The World Economic Forum (WEF) issued a white paper this month calling for all players along the manufacturing chain to expedite the adoption of advanced digital technologies that enhance the collaborative supply chain. WEF has given the industry plenty of homework in the directives it detailed in the document:

  • Mine artificial intelligence (AI), predictive analytics, and machine learning technologies to reduce material consumption and increase resource efficiency
  • Utilize electronic labels, such as an integrated electronic display or a machine-readable code that links to a webpage (e.g., QR code), in order to foster the seamless movement of products across different regions that each have their own unique information and labeling requirements
  • Leverage digital twin technology to combat fraud
  • Use the potpourri of “it” technologies—blockchain, the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT), edge computing, predictive analytics, etc.—to increase supply chain network agility so that organizations don’t miss a beat when faced with natural disasters, new tariffs, social instability, equipment or infrastructure failure, or any other unforeseen events that can disrupt operations
  • Remanufacture, reduce, reuse, and recycle parts wherever possible

WEF’s report is dotted with success stories from household names, including Foxconn, Ralph Lauren Corporation, Apple, and General Motors.

Now, nobody’s disagreeing with WEF’s premise; there’s an urgency for component suppliers, assembly manufacturers, final-product producers, and users to adopt these technologies—those who don’t will perish. However, we were struck by the relative simplicity of the use cases put forth in WEF’s paper. This isn’t to say that the achievements of the aforementioned brands came easily or that they implemented these technologies handily, but the case studies consisted largely of linear one-to-one relationships.

In reality, many of the increasingly complex products and services that manufacturers are trying to deliver today depend on an ecosystem of multiple deeply intertwined partners. As Russ Buchanan, CSAP, vice president of global channel strategy alliances and operations at Xerox and ASAP’s chairman emeritus, noted in a recent discussion about sourcing in the new economy, there can be as many as five or six vendors delivering a single smart vehicle, heart monitor, or other interactive device. Each of these partners has its own large network of suppliers and subcontractors. That is a lot of moving parts!

With each of these players bringing an essential part of a solution, a collaborative supply chain needs more than just these wonderful technologies themselves to deliver transformative solutions.

“The sourcing community is definitely being very sophisticated in some cases in managing their suppliers like alliance partners,” said Buchanan. “Increasingly, I find that the people in sourcing need these [alliance management] skills. When they start to work with a supplier, they’re trying to get more than just the lowest possible cost of commodity, the primary mission of most sourcing agencies. Increasingly, what you hear us asking our suppliers for, and what we hear our customers asking us for is, ‘Do more than that. Give me good value, but also give me innovation. Help me change my business. Help my transformation be more competitive in enhancing my customers’ experience working with us.’”

There is a much deeper degree of codependency between alliance members working together to construct solutions of this nature than the average supplier in a company’s network. This interdependency makes it much harder to switch suppliers in the face of a political revolution, seven-on-the-Richter-Scale earthquake, or sudden tariff hike, even if your predictive analytics algorithm is recommending and providing the blueprint for a change. That digital twin will certainly help the partner ecosystem synthesize a voluminous amount of data into actionable direction on how to maintain and enhance physical assets, systems, and processes, but it won’t help you iron out disagreements between each partner over how to implement changes.

As the degree of mutual dependence increases in manufacturing partnerships, the less effective advanced digital technologies will be in enhancing collaboration without good old-fashioned “soft skills,” particularly those set forth in The ASAP Handbook of Alliance Management. After all, conflict management, issues identification, and risk mitigation are integral parts of managing an alliance. Andrew Eibling, CSAP, vice president of business development and alliance management at Enable Injections, Inc., said it takes more backroom interaction to maintain a healthy relationship once you make the leap from run-of-the-mill supplier to strategic ally—or “Vegas-rules discussions,” as he framed it, where “you can have conversations with somebody about the partnership, but what we talk about stays here.”

In other words, supply chain collaboration has in many cases risen to a level of sophistication that requires more than just state-of-the-art software to drive industry-changing outcomes.

Be sure to check out the forthcoming editions of Strategic Alliance Monthly and Strategic Alliance Quarterly in Q4, which will feature deeper explorations of the evolving relationship between alliance managers and the sourcing and procurement functions as the latter more and more often find themselves managing their supplier relationships like alliances.  

Tags:  alliance managers  alliances  Andrew Eibling  artificial intelligence (AI)  Enable Injections  manufacturing partners  partner  predictive analytics  Russ Buchanan  sourcing and procurement  Strategic Alliance Monthly  Strategic Alliance Quarterly  supplier relationships  World Economic Forum  Xerox 

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New Offerings at ASAP BioPharma Conference Address Wide-ranging Impacts on the Healthcare and Life Sciences Industries

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Saturday, August 27, 2016

As futuristic technologies become realities, professionals in the life sciences and healthcare industries are consulting their maps and charts to determine how their companies should navigate the new waters. Attendees at ASAP’s next BioPharma Conference will have an opportunity to collectively view the vast possibilities at “New Faces, Unexpected Places in Partnering: The Foresight to Lead, the Foundation to Succeed,” Sept. 7-9 at the Revere Hotel in Boston, Mass., USA. This year’s conference will address wide-ranging impacts on the industry, including the changing political scene, multi-partnering, the Internet of Things, and assistive technologies. 

 

After a rich offering of workshops on Sept. 7, the conference will kick off with a timely address from keynote speaker Dr. Sam Nussbaum, strategic consultant, EGB Advisors, Inc., who will present a talk on “Healing the U.S. Health Care System: Collaboration is Essential” (for more information about Nussbaum, see the link in this E-news), followed by a networking opportunity. The following two days include a plenary and about 26 forward-thinking, thought-provoking sessions from which to choose.

 

"The ASAP Biopharma Conference is a must-attend for alliance professionals of all experience levels,” says Jan Twombly, CSAP, former ASAP chairman of programming, and president of The Rhythm of Business. “It traditionally offers equal parts of looking outward to how the industry is changing and the implications for managing the risk and optimizing the value of alliances and other collaborations, as well as looking inward to develop the mindset, skillset, and toolset of a modern alliance capability.”

 

Well-known and respected industry luminaries are unveiling some never-before-presented information and perspectives. Take, for example, these insightful offerings:

  •  “Applying the Latest Alliance Management Research to Your Partnering Practice,” presented by Stuart Kliman, CA-AM, partner, alliance practice leader at Vantage Partners, and Shawn Wilson, DBA, vice president and general manager at Beaulieu Group: Two new groundbreaking research studies provide critical data on current trends, challenges, and opportunities in the alliance management profession.
  • “A New Model for Western and Chinese Pharmaceutical Partnering,” presented by Brent Harvey, CA-AM, director of Alliances, Eli Lilly and Company: "How To" insights on collaboration drawn from a longstanding, advanced partnership model between Eli Lilly and Company and WuXi AppTech, which provides, among other things, examples of how to leverage the regulatory environment in China to bring new drugs to market faster.
  • “New Partnerships between High Tech and BioPharma and the Alliance Management Practices to Support Them,” presented by Russ Buchanan, CSAP head of corporate alliances at Xerox Corporation, Joseph Schramm, VP strategic alliances at BeyondTrust, and David Thompson, CA-AM chief alliance officer at Eli Lilly and Company: Key insights provided by two highly accomplished technology company alliance executives that are sure to generate discussion about how biopharma alliance professionals can overcome potential challenges when partnering with tech companies.

 Preparing for rapid change is a central theme throughout the conference, and some of the workshops are offering essential “updates” for the alliance management toolbox. “With many more partners for many more purposes, new partnering models and differences to leverage, no alliance manager can rest on his or her laurels,” points out Twombly. “Unique among biopharma alliance management conferences, the ASAP Biopharma Conference leans in on where the profession is going, not where it has been."

 

Several workshops being offered emphasize the need to stay abreast of pressing industry changes, such as “Next Generation Alliance Management, Lean and Agile” facilitated by Lynda McDermott, CA-AM, president of EquiPro International, and Annick De Swaef, CSAP, managing partner of Consensa Consulting. Their workshop addresses digitalization’s influence on biopharma and cross-industry partnering, and it centers around basic questions that everyone in the industry is asking: “Are my team's current alliance best practices future proof? Should my alliance team acquire new skills?” De Swaef recommends combining ASAP’s newly launched in-company team training with the CA-AM Certification Exam Prep to strengthen company capabilities, expand into new areas of value creation, and introduce new best practices.

 

Twombly and Rhythm of Business Principal, Jeff Shuman, CSAP, are offering their own forward-thinking, 90-minute, hands-on workshop on design thinking for complex problems, such as for multi-partnering, non-asset-base alliances, and partnering with “sectors who run on much faster clock speeds than is typically seen in biopharma.” The data-driven, user experience-centered innovation and problem-solving methodology has been adapted for alliances and partnering practices.

 ASAP also plans to unveil a new custom-designed session: The ASAP Aquarium, facilitated by Twombly. Similar to a “fishbowl” communications activity, where the line is intentionally blurred between listeners and participants, ASAP’s version will start off with a deep discussion between industry thought leaders and senior-level partnering executives as the audience gazes into the aquarium. Listeners will then be able to “tap in,” join the discussion with a hot idea or new perspective, and replace the initial participants. The session provides for a fun way to actively engage and contribute to the collective wisdom of the group while exploring the questions that matter most as alliance professionals “engage with new faces and in unexpected places.”

Tags:  Alliance Professionals  Annick De Swaef  ASAP BioPharma Conference  BeyondTrust  Brent Harvey  collaboration  David Thompson  Dr. Sam Nussbaum  Eli Lilly and Company  EquiPro International  Jan Twombly  Jeff Shuman  Joseph Schramm  Lynda McDermott  Russ Buchanan  The Rhythm of Business  WuXi AppTech  Xerox 

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What’s Brewing in the 2016 Biopharma Conference Beaker? | Part 2

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Wednesday, July 20, 2016
Updated: Tuesday, July 19, 2016

In a recent interview, ASAP CEO Mike Leonetti, CSAP, provided a sampling of what’s to come at the 2016 ASAP BioPharma Conference. He offered insights into the changing landscape for partnerships and how alliance managers and others need to adapt, as well as a preview of speakers and cutting edge sessions and workshops. 

What about ASAP? What’s brewing in the beaker and will be shared at the conference?

We will be unveiling, and introducing the author of, ASAP’s new study “The Economics of Alliances, Social Capital, and Alliance Performance,” which is scheduled for release after the conference as ASAP’s 6th State of Alliances study. You can read a preview of the study and view some of the research data in the upcoming Summer Strategic Alliance Magazine. Dr. Shawn Wilson, the author, has worked with ASAP to provide financial and economic return on investment (ROI) analytics that are a direct outcome of alliance/partnership management excellence.

What are some of the cutting edge, not-to-be-missed sessions you recommend?

While every session is going to be fantastic, the session that discusses digital or tech partnering capabilities, “New Partnerships between High Tech and BioPharma and the Alliance Management Practices to Support Them,” led by Russ Buchanan, CSAP, head of corporate alliances, Xerox Corporation, and “New Partnerships Between High Tech and BioPharma and the Alliance Management Practices to Support Them,” facilitated by Donna Peek, CSAP, director, partner enablement & operations at SAS Institute, will be timely. The unveiling of ASAP’s research and “Applying the Latest Alliance Management Research to Your Partnering Practice,” by Shawn Wilson, in conjunction with Stuart Kliman, CA-AM, who is presenting Vantage Partners’ research findings, should not be missed.  I think the sessions on “Strategic Perspectives on a Partnership's First 100 Days” offer a new twist on partnering with new players. Another session on partnering in China addresses the crucial need to understand and learn about that country, “A New Model for Western and Chinese Pharmaceutical Partnering,” by Brent Harvey, CA-AM, director, alliance management at Eli Lilly and Company.

Every year ASAP provides workshops for the alliance management toolbox. What’s new in the box this year?

There are several fantastic “Tools and Techniques” pre-conference workshops, the CA-AM and CSAP prep workshops, the Eli Lilly and Company “Alliance Management, Tools and Techniques, “ which never fails to draw rave reviews, as well as one from Candido Arreche, CA-AM, global director of portfolio & partner management, six sigma black belt at Xerox Worldwide Alliances, on “How to Resolve Conflict in Your Alliance.” New to ASAP is the workshop “Next Generation Alliance Management, Lean and Agile,” facilitated by Lynda McDermott, CA-AM, president of Equipro International, and Annick De Swaef, CSAP, president of Consensa, which will preview ASAP’s new corporate alliance management and certification program designed to offer a customized workshop for a company wishing to quickly add to its partnership capability and value creation.

To view the program and download brochure information, go to www. asapweb.org/biopharma.

Tags:  Alliance Management  Annick DeSwaef  Brent Harvey  Candido Arreche  certification  Consensa  digital  Donna Peek  Dr. Shawn Wilson  Eli Lilly and Company  Equipro International  Lynda McDermott  partnership  Russ Buchanan  SAS  Stuart Kliman  Vantage Partners  Xerox Worldwide Alliances 

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