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Leaders ‘in a Time of Rapid Growth and Change’: Finalists for Announced for 2019 ASAP Alliance Excellence Awards

Posted By Noel B. Richards, 12 hours ago

Finalists Include Alcon Laboratories, Science Applications International Corporation, Keryx Biopharmaceuticals (subsidiary of Akebia Therapeutics), Thermo Fisher Scientific, Merck & Co., Merck KGaA, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Cambridge Assessment English, Novartis, Incyte, Sanofi Pasteur, and Red Hat 

ASAP will honor companies and organizations, practices, and programs that exemplify exceptional performance in alliance management during the ASAP Alliance Excellence Awards ceremony at the 2019 ASAP Global Alliance Summit, which runs March 11-13 at the Westin Fort Lauderdale Beach Resort in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. This month, ASAP announced the companies that are 2019 Alliance Excellence Awards finalists: Alcon Laboratories, Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), Keryx Biopharmaceuticals (now a subsidiary of Akebia Therapeutics), Thermo Fisher Scientific, Merck & Co., Merck KGaA, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Cambridge Assessment English, Novartis, Incyte, Sanofi Pasteur, and Red Hat. See the official press release issued via PRWeb.

“This remarkable group of companies has demonstrated significant leadership in alliance management during a time of rapid growth and change for business—and for the partnering profession,” said Michael Leonetti, president & CEO of ASAP. “Our awards committee reviewed a number of outstanding nominees from diverse industries this year, and we’re pleased to recognize these exceptional partners and programs whose success stories and practices can serve as models for the alliance management community.”

Alcon Laboratories’ alliance program contains a complete set of fully documented best practices supported by information technology tools. With a small alliance group, they manage many partners through consistency applying these practices and tools.

 

Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) has developed an alliance program covers not only the “hard” alliance elements, but also pays attention to the “softer” rules of the game, resulting in substantial contribution to revenues as well as recognition from partners. Partner tiering is consistently worked out across the strategic, financial, and relational elements of business.

 

Keryx Biopharmaceuticals (now a subsidiary of Akebia Therapeutics) and Thermo Fisher Scientific collaborated to resolve supply constraints to ensure that patients were able to access Keryx’s proprietary drug through agility and excellent teamwork at all levels of operation.

 

Merck KGaA–Bristol-Myers Squibb’s alliance has operated with financial transparency and consistent best practices since its formation in China in the 1990s, a time when the Chinese market was much less accessible.

 

Novartis–Incyte’s decade-long collaboration covers the co-marketing and co-development of an oncology drug in split geographical areas. The alliance has applied best practices across the alliance lifecycle, and led the way for a foundation for a broader alliance mindset in the respective organizations.


Merck & Co. and Sanofi Pasteur built a joint venture for a new drug utilizing a governance model inspired by small, nimble biotech companies to ensure speed and flexibility. The commercialization phase of the new drug so far is very successful.

 

Red Hat completely revamped an alliance training program for its alliance and channel managers, providing a clear learning path for everyone with several checkpoints and feedback options that support managers in their learning. The alliance program has leveraged e-learning and digitization, supported by well-designed management processes.

Cambridge Assessment English teamed up with Future Learn and Crisis Classroom to deliver an online training program for volunteers who help refugees meet refugee needs by focusing on language support. Volunteers (8,000 thus far have signed up) are able to exchange their experience in addition to accessing formal learning modules.

 

Merck KGaA developed its Joint Committee Self-Assessment tool after alliance surveys showed that decision-making in the organization’s alliances were too slow. This easily implemented tool helps committees improve their decision making has become standard in the Merck alliance toolkit.

Read the complete press release on PRWeb at http://www.prweb.com/releases/finalists_for_announced_for_2019_asap_alliance_excellence_awards/prweb16099885.htm. Stay tuned for much more coverage of the 2019 finalists and the stories behind their successes on this blog and in Strategic Alliance Quarterly and Monthly magazines.

Tags:  Akebia  Alcon  alliance  ASAP Alliance Excellence Awards  best practices  Bristol-Myers Squibb  Cambridge Assessment English  governance  Incyte  Keryx Biopharmaceuticals  Merck & Co.  Merck KGaA  Novartis  Red Hat  Sanofi Pasteur  Science Applications International Corporation  Thermo Fisher Scientific  toolkit 

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ASAP Summit Spotlight Leadership Forum Highlights Exceptional Contributions: Part 3—From Great Platforms to Epiphanies

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Thursday, August 17, 2017
Updated: Tuesday, August 15, 2017

The following is a continuation from Part 2 of the ASAP Summit Spotlight Leadership Forum Q&A Panel session, which took place last March at the 2017 ASAP Global Alliance Summit “Profit, Innovation, and Value for the Part­nering Enterprise,” held in San Diego, Calif. Highlighted on the podium for their exceptional company contributions were Celine Schillinger of Sanofi Pasteur; Chris Haskell of Bayer; Maria Olson of NetApp; and Kevin Hickey of BeyondTrust. The session was moderated by John W. DeWitt, CEO of JW DeWitt Business Communications and publisher and editor of ASAP Media and Strategic Alliance Magazine.  After DeWitt finished his questions, the audience jumped in with their own, one of which is included at the end of this post. 

Describe the greatest epiphany of your career, something that changed your worldview and made you a better executive or leader.

Maria: This was definitely an epiphany: I started working in the supply chain and felt like I was always in the trunk and someone else was driving. I wanted to get in the car. I had more value to give. I then tried product management and was lucky to work for a small division in telecom. I felt like a high tech janitor. And when you try to do everything, you don’t really do anything right to some degree. But in the end, that was all great training ground. My most challenging job, the one I didn’t like the most, was the most beneficial.

Chris: When you do the drug discovery business, 20 to 30 new drugs are approved each year. The more I stepped back, the more I realized my passion was about connecting and empowering rather than being an adventurer and discoverer. I began looking for ways to impact the company, writing strategies on how to create this hub, referring to how to move things along. And advancing the technology to beat cancer I get such joy out of being part of that.

Kevin: I worked for IBM and became one of the glorified gophers for the chairman’s office. Years later, I was sitting in a boardroom seeing a patient system that was broken. It was just so bad. It was a great and fabulous company, but at that point, I realized I wanted to go somewhere smaller.

Maria, FlexPod is a platform. Solutions die very quickly. You created a platform that was able to evolve, and you won an ASAP award several years ago because you took the time to get it right.

Maria: At NetApp, we do it similarly to what Kevin has described [see Part 2 of this blog series]. We step back, ask “what is the value we are delivering,” and hold ourselves to a higher level of thinking.

Celine: I would advocate to go faster and refrain from overthinking. In pharma, every step becomes huge and complicated. It’s as if it feeds itself with its own complexity. We spend more time building than actually doing it. It’s important to realize when perfection is needed, and when it is not.

Audience question from Luna of Belgium: How do you organize this? I understand that purpose, mastery, and a sense of perfection need to be everywhere. But do you create mastery throughout the organization, or do you create the silo for really good professionals? What is the tradeoff between mastery and autonomy? The silo is so natural for pharma.

Chris: Bayer went through a transformation of its alliance structure years ago. There are other parts of the organization in alliance management, and now we are starting to develop best practices and work with them. There are different frameworks within the organization. We’ve also started talking about rolling out trainings that we think are valuable for this transformation.

Maria: I work for companies where alliances are spread out, corporate strategic alliances are all over the map. HP brought the question to a leadership council and surveyed top strategic alliances. At the end of the day, [leadership recognized that] we need to stop having four to five people calling us from your company, and the decision they made was to pick new patterns from a management standpoint. It’s very different to manage everything strategically.

Kevin: It shouldn’t just be executives making decisions. You want to find the right people who have a great viewpoint, such as a systems engineer, and you pull them in. You need to find the knowledge workers to help your collaboration. You have to find the right people. Executives are not looking at all of the details every day.

Celine: There’s often a long debate in companies about quality belonging to the quality department. Actually, quality belongs to everyone who wants to own it. Co-create the purpose. It’s attractive to be co-owned. Anyone who feels they can contribute to the way we work is welcome. Boundaries become less important. What is important is how motivated and connected people are in the organization. Instead of appointing teams, we called for volunteers and asked why they wanted to lead the change initiative. We ended up with a team of 25. The jury, which is made up of half volunteers and half leaders, needed to focus on emotional intelligence and a willingness to help. It’s a peer-to-peer network. People want to make a difference. When you tap into this pool, you achieve miracles.

This concludes ASAP Media’s three-blog series covering the Spotlight Leadership Forum Q&A. You can read Part 1 and Part 2 here.  http://membersstrategicalliances.site-ym.com/blogpost/1143942/ASAP-Blog

Tags:  alliances  Bayer  BeyondTrust  Celine Schillinger  Chris Haskell  frameworks  Kevin Hickey  Maria Olson  NetApp  network  product management  Sanofi Pasteur  strategic alliances 

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ASAP Summit Spotlight Leadership Forum Highlights Exceptional Contributions: Part 2—Building Better Company Culture Through Collaboration

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Wednesday, August 16, 2017
Updated: Tuesday, August 15, 2017

The following is a continuation from Part 1 of the Spotlight Leadership Forum Q&A Panel session, which took place last March at the 2017 ASAP Global Alliance Summit “Profit, Innovation, and Value for the Part­nering Enterprise,” held at the San Diego Marriott Mission Valley, San Diego, California. Highlighted on the podium for their exceptional company contributions were Celine Schillinger of Sanofi Pasteur; Chris Haskell of Bayer; Maria Olson of NetApp; and Kevin Hickey of BeyondTrust. The session was moderated by John W. DeWitt, CEO of JW DeWitt Business Communications and publisher and editor of ASAP Media and Strategic Alliance Magazine, who plied the panel in this with questions on how to build better company culture and frameworks through partnering.

Kevin, when did that [collaboration] light bulb go off for you, or did you always get it? And as an chief executive, how do you drive your company to be more collaborative and successful in partnering?

Kevin: BeyondTrust is made up of nine different businesses. When we came in [to manage the newly combined companies], they had their own system. Our objective was to build the culture on the values we have, and determine what the benefits of the values are and the outcomes. … We tried to get everyone singing out of the same hymnals. We needed structural change, but it really was about culture, and it worked its way down. When we went forward, it was not just a “rah-rah” kick off. It’s was all about communications and driving it throughout the organization.

Maria: The executive team sets the culture of the organization. When I started at HP, it was very collaborative and had a consensus orientation. When I fast forward to some other companies I’ve been to, and it was command and control. The top-level team does set the tone. “Selective collaborations” is what I call it.

You also talked a lot about sales, Kevin. In highly competitive sales environments, there are big challenges. How do you change thought there?

Kevin: You need open communications and clear expectations with everyone in the organization. I don’t care what position you are in the company, if you don’t know how your job affects the company, it needs to start there. You have to be very collaborative, but at some point in time you have to say, “The train is leaving.” Smart people want to get to a decision and move on. Smart people say, if we make a mistake, we will own up to it, adjust, and move forward.

Celine: It’s the paradoxical junction between collaboration and performance via the carrot and stick. We put people in boxes, and it’s crazy. At the same time, research shows people are motived by autonomy, mastery, and purpose. So how do we try to evolve our company’s performance management system? Because of this desire for control, it infiltrates every function other than HR. If we can’t change that, how can we inspire people? How can we cope with the way organizations manage people and also focus attention on something elsethe excitement, the journey, etcetera. It’s not black and white, it’s complicated.

What are some of the strategies you deal with in terms of the need for speed, the need to have deliberation, to not be reactive. How can you balance that today?

Kevin: Sometimes you have to go slower to go faster. You want process. I do find that as a company, you’ll see the people who are doing the rework all the time. To me, you have to guide people to slow down and think about what they are trying to accomplish. All the mistakes I made when I went into partnering in the channel alliance business, it was a quick fix. It really takes thoughtful collaborating up front with people who have done it to get 85 percent of a plan agreed to. It will save you a ton of time on the back end.

For Part 1 in this series, please go here: http://www.strategic-alliances.org/blogpost/1143942/282809/ASAP-Summit-Spotlight-Leadership-Forum-Highlights-Exceptional-Contributions-Part-1-Inspiring-a-Movement-for-Change-Within-Your-Company . ASAP Media’s coverage of the Spotlight Leadership Forum Q&A continues in Part 3.

Tags:  BeyondTrust  Celine Schillinger  collaborations  collaborative  communications  Kevin Hickey  Maria Olson  NetApp  Sanofi Pasteur  strategies 

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ASAP Summit Spotlight Leadership Forum Highlights Exceptional Contributions: Part 1—Inspiring a Movement for Change Within Your Company

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Every day, alliance managers work diligently to advance concepts, innovations, or products for the marketplace: self-driving cars to reduce road hazards and deaths; new drugs to promote healing and lessen suffering; technological breakthroughs to minimize energy use and reduce global warming. ASAP believes these managers deserve to be highlighted for their remarkable accomplishments, which is why the association held a Summit Spotlight Leadership Forum Q&A Panel session last March at the 2017 ASAP Global Alliance Summit “Profit, Innovation, and Value for the Part­nering Enterprise,” Feb. 28-March 2, held in San Diego, San Diego, Calif. The session was moderated by John W. DeWitt, CEO of JW DeWitt Business Communications and publisher and editor of ASAP Media and Strategic Alliance Magazine. Highlighted on the podium for their exceptional company contributions were Celine Schillinger of Sanofi Pasteur; Chris Haskell of Bayer; Maria Olson of NetApp; and Kevin Hickey of BeyondTrust. In Part 1 of this three part series, DeWitt directs the first question to Schillinger, who spearheaded a movement at Sanofi Pasteur that led to cultural changes and a progressive alliance with The Synergist. The win-win partnership also led to receipt of the ASAP Alliances for Social Responsibility Alliance Excellence Award for “Break Dengue.”

Celine, how did you get the inspiration to drive a people’s movement within your company?

Celine: It started with feelings we often don’t talk about in the workplace, such as anger and frustration. That can serve as an impulse to push you to the next level. It can serve to push and challenge the status quo. The first people’s movement started by chance—it was to foster diversity. I had such wonderful talented people around me, and that lack of diversity was affecting the people and the company itself. I thought, “I have got to do something, even if it’s just a small step. If I just complain, it will not go anywhere.” I realized I catalyzed something that no one was addressing. It came as a big surprise—I never thought something like that would happen. It changed my life and career, and I am very grateful for the company that enabled me to do that. It wasn’t easy for them or for me. I know I’ve been a pain in the neck—sometimes we are human, we don’t like to change things that seem to be working. But it’s our role to push and to trigger change. If we don’t do it, no one will do it.

How did you get executive buy in?

Celine: It doesn’t happen overnight, for sure. You have got to focus on your purpose and the ways to reach your purpose. When you start, you don’t have a budget or department, but connections have a value. Look where there are pockets of energy, and have deep conversations about your purpose. If you have deep connections that build up, you become a force. Mastering communications in your marketing will make you unavoidable to leadership. We also did things under the radar. Seek validation. Build connections. The company then will begin to see you as an opportunity. The first reaction was mockery about our being a feminist group. But when we got an award for the company, and then another, they realized we were an opportunity for them to shine. We said: “Welcome. We will be much stronger with you.” And don’t forget to work on yourself.  Be inclusive, be inclusive all the time.

Chris: Your point about having a vision [is valuable]—you can then tailor it to your customer. The [vision] incubator is also a response to frustration. In our case, we went from project manager to partnering. It was so frustrating because the home office couldn’t see the value. We tried to show them that this [vision] they didn’t act on can become valuable. That’s exactly what they don’t want to hear. So you need to create a model with autonomy and control. Create buy in for management in this case so they can see the long-term vision. A CEO at the time gave official buy in. He said, “I don’t know what will come of this. Just don’t hurt the little companies.” I will close with the fact that we had a value proposal that was a four-year plan that highlighted to the community that didn’t know us that we were of value. What we found is that the opposition eventually came back with opportunities to expand this.

Maria: You have to be connected and passionate for your cause. Executives need to know how you believe. Then you have to show them how to get there. That’s when they get confident. If you really want to do a big partnership or alliance, you need to believe in it because, if you don’t, no one else will.

ASAP Media’s coverage of the Summit Spotlight Leadership Forum Q&A continues in Part 2. 

Tags:  alliance  alliance managers  Bayer  Celine Schillinger  Chris Haskell  communications  Maria Olson  NetApp  partnering  partnership  Sanofi Pasteur  win-win partnerships 

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Changing Corporate Culture To Create Social Impact: A Plenary by Céline Schillinger

Posted By Genevieve Fraser, Tuesday, March 21, 2017
Updated: Friday, March 17, 2017

“I want to change the way organizations work. I want to make business more humane and more relevant to what employees, customers, and stakeholders at large want today,” remarked Céline Schillinger, head of innovation and engagement at the  French-based vaccine manufacturer Sanofi Pasteur during the first of four ASAP plenary sessions at the 2017 ASAP Global Alliance Summit, “Profit, Innovation, and Value for the Partnering Enterprise,” at the San Diego Marriott Mission Valley, San Diego, California.

We can’t stick to 20th century tools and mindset to create value today. They’re not adapted to our complex, globalized and interconnected world. They’re obsolete,” Schillinger emphasized during her talk “Comfort in Discomfort: Leadership and Innovation from an Uncommon Alliance.”

Schillinger has been recognized with prestigious awards many times over for her innovative engagement initiatives in the pharma world, and specifically, for her role in the successful launch of the first vaccine developed to combat dengue fever. The plenary focused on her life as an international business-oriented engagement professional with an expertise in social technologies, marketing, communications, and human relations.  She explained how she developed a social movement to create change in a very conservative and hierarchical company environment.

In short, Schillinger has succeeded to make change as a corporate activist in a top-down, male dominated system. “I’ve started to change this in my own organization with corporate activism. There’s considerable energy when you tap into a broader pool of knowledge, common purpose, social media, and co-creation. I want to expand this work within my organization and beyond,” she continued.

When Sanofi Pasteur was preparing to roll out their groundbreaking dengue fever vaccine, they were confident that a tried-and-true approach to launch the product would succeed and the vaccine would sell itself. After all, dengue fever is a greatly feared, potentially serious disease delivered through the bite of a mosquito. Its potential victims are the 2.5 billion people living in Latin America and Asia as well as the southern part of the United States. Though the disease was virtually nonexistent 50 years ago, it’s now widespread. There’s no prevention and no cure. When outbreaks occur each year, half-a-million people with severe dengue are hospitalized. Some recover, but thousands die.

With a break-through vaccine to combat dengue fever about to be approved and commercially available in several countries, executives at Sanofi strongly resisted Schillinger’s radical outreach approach. Communication campaigns are the usual response for many governments in affected countries. They often try community-based approaches, in line with the World Health Organization’s recommendations. But their success is limited. The question was, how might this be made more effective as well as more efficient?

For Schillinger, the answer was obvious: “Why not use social media?” she asked. Social media could be used to inform people about the new way to fight dengue fever, but equally important, to connect people to a whole network potentially impacted by an outbreak. Through social media, people “connect and exchange with trusted interlocutors who derive their credibility from what they do, not just what they say. This is a transformative shift for communication and activism, and this has huge consequences for healthcare,” she stated.

Social networks are not just an additional tool for pushing information, she argued. Through social media such as Twitter and Facebook, as well as websites and chat rooms, users contribute their own experiences. They check facts and demand feedback. It’s much more than communication, she said. Eventually, she convinced the executives at Sanofi Pasteur, and she was proved right. Her initiative, the Break Dengue Community, garnered over 250,000 Facebook followers in its first year and enlisted over 4,000 volunteers globally to assist in the distribution and administration of vaccines. 

This approach may not be for the faint of heart, but “health organizations and companies have to adapt to this new interaction model,” she concluded.

Schillinger has been recognized as a 40 Women to Watch Honoree (2016) and received the Gold Quill Award (2016), Employee Engagement Award (2016), Most Impactful Emerging Initiative (2015), and Best Use of Social Media for Healthcare (2014) and was honored as the French Businesswoman of the year (2013).  She is also a TEDx speaker https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CMDKkTuLUHw, blogger, and charter Member of Change Agents Worldwide.  

Tags:  Alliances  Break Dengue  Céline Schillinger  Collaboration  dengue fever  Emerging Initiative  Engagement  Facebook  French Businesswoman  Impactful  Innovation  Partnering  Sanofi Pasteur  Social Impact  Social Media  Twitter 

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