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Winners of 2019 ASAP Alliance Excellence Awards in Five Categories Announced at ASAP Global Alliance Summit

Posted By Noel B. Richards, Wednesday, March 20, 2019

“It is part of the mission of ASAP to advance alliance excellence and achieve it. Awards are the recognition of that—alliance managers and companies committed to best practices and achieving corporate value through their alliance programs,” said Norma Watenpaugh, CSAP, CEO and founding principal, Phoenix Consulting Group, who has been a judge of the ASAP Alliance Excellence Awards since 2003.

Awards for 2019 were announced in five categories on Tuesday, March 12 at the 2019 ASAP Global Alliance Summit, which took place at the Westin Hotel in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. A total of five awards were presented: Alliance Program Excellence Award; Individual Alliance Excellence—Emerging; Individual Alliance Excellence—Long-Established; Alliance for Corporate Social Responsibility; Innovative Best Alliance Practice. ASAP also presented two chapter awards: Excellence in Chapter Innovation and Excellence in Chapter Programs.

Awards committee member Ard-Pieter de Man, CSAP, PhD from Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam presented the awards to the winners.

Alliance Program Excellence Award is given to organizations that have instilled the capability to consistently implement and manage alliance portfolios and demonstrate success of those alliances over time. According to the judges, this year’s winner has focused on strong alignment of alliance management with value propositions. It has developed an alliance program that covers not only the “hard” alliance elements, but also pays attention to the “softer” rules of the game, resulting in substantial contribution to revenues as well as recognition from partners. Partner tiering is consistently worked out across the strategic, financial, and relational elements of business. The winner this year is Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC).

Individual Alliance Excellence—Emerging is awarded to an emerging alliance for excellence in planning, implementation, and results achieved by instituting practices, tools, and methodologies in support of successful formation and management. This award was a tie between two alliances. The first winner had a strong level of team collaboration around a drug against kidney disease. They implemented an alliance model from the C-level to operational level, and back up again. The alliance collaborated to resolve supply constraints to ensure that patients were able to access Keryx’s (subsidiary of Akebia Therapeutics) proprietary drug through agility and excellent teamwork at all levels of operation. This first recipient is Keryx (subsidiary of Akebia Therapeutics and Thermo Fisher Scientific. The second award recipient built a joint venture for a new drug utilizing a governance model inspired by small, nimble biotech companies to ensure speed and flexibility. The commercialization phase of the new drug so far is very successful. The recipient is Merck & Company and Sanofi Pasteur.

Individual Alliance Excellence—Long-Established targets a specific alliance for excellence in planning, implementation, and results achieved by instituting practices, tools, and methodologies in support of successful formation and management. The winner of this award demonstrated more than 10 years of collaboration to co-develop and co-market a drug. This oncology drug was co-developed over split geographical regions. They applied best practices across the alliance process, and the alliance set the foundation for an alliance mindset in both companies, which at the time were relatively new to alliances. This alliance is between Novartis and Incyte. 

Alliance for Corporate Social Responsibility is presented for making a profound, measurable, and positive social impact, regardless of profit—although profit is not discouraged. The winner of this award is an alliance that came together with two partners, FutureLearn and Crisis Classroom, to offer a MOOC (massive open online courses) to volunteers, training them in meeting refugee needs. They collaborated to focus on language support for the teachers and the students. This trio combined formal learning with exchange of experience via partner platforms, addressing multiple issues with the process. It follows alliance management principles and the ASAP handbook to a “T.” They currently have over 8,000 volunteers signed up  to help refugees build proficiency in the English language, demonstrating a significant social impact. Cambridge Assessment English was recognized for this award.

Innovative Best Alliance Practice Award is presented for alliance management tools, functions, methods, or processes that have made an immediate, powerful, demonstrable impact on the organization and/or discipline of alliance management. The winner of this award has rebuilt its alliance training program, supported by a change in the management process. It moves beyond training into sustained professional development and has a clear learning path with checkpoints and feedback for all their alliance and channel managers. They have provided a groundbreaking example of how e-learning and digitation supports alliance managers. This innovative company is Red Hat.

Chapter Awards
Two ASAP chapters also received awards for their excellence. The New England Chapter planned ahead, expanded and energized an engaged and effective leadership team. Their leadership team has been active in sharing the benefits of ASAP with their partnering companies. The Tri-State Chapter delivered quality and engaging events that focused on both relevant and varied topics. Along with this, they made great use of geographically distributed venues and sponsorships, and saw a growing average attendance. They are driven by an expanding leadership team with global and corporate members, committed participation, and great event team management.

Additional information about the awards finalists can be found in the Strategic Alliance Quarterly Q1 2019 article “Eclectic Mix of Partners and Alliances Vie for ASAP Alliance Excellence Awards.” See the ASAP Media team’s comprehensive coverage of the 2019 ASAP Global Alliance Summit on the ASAP blog and in Strategic Alliance publications.

Tags:  ASAP Alliance Excellence Awards  Cambridge Assessment English  Crisis Classroom  FutureLearn  Incyte  Keryx  Merck & Company  Novartis  Red Hat  SAIC  Sanofi Pasteur  Thermo Fisher Scientific 

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Awards Finalists Describe Complex Joint Venture for a New Vaccine—Part 1

Posted By ASAP Media, Wednesday, February 27, 2019

Merck Vaccines and Sanofi Pasteur are finalists for a 2019 ASAP Alliance Excellence Award to be presented at the upcoming ASAP Global Alliance Summit, “Agile Partnering in Today’s Collaborative Ecosystem,” March 11-13 at the Westin Fort Lauderdale Beach Resort in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. The companies built a joint venture for a new drug utilizing a governance model inspired by small, nimble biotech companies to ensure speed and flexibility. The commercialization phase of the new drug has been very successful. ASAP Media asked Jean-Phillipe Proust and Chris Scirrotto of Sanofi Pasteur, and Eric Skjeveland of Merck Vaccines to respond to these questions to help our readers better understand the processes used to develop the very complex joint venture, and why it’s noteworthy for the alliance management community.

Why did you apply for an ASAP Alliance Excellence Award?

We thought the alliance management community would be interested in our experiences bringing two large vaccine companies together, with different organizations and cultures, in order to create an agile European structure able to adjust and adapt to the new market condition in Europe (MCM Vaccine BV). At the same time, these two companies were closing a long-lasting, full-scale joint venture in the same market geographya very complex undertaking that ended up successfully.   

What drug was developed?

VAXELIS is an infant hexavalent combination vaccine that helps to protect against six diseasesdiphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), poliomyelitis, hepatitis B and invasive disease due to H. influenzae type b.  This complex global product has taken more than 15 years to develop and launch in the European Union market. The six antigens in this vaccine are produced and packaged using five different facilities in four countries between EU and North America.   

What best practices did you use to improve alliance management practices and enhance the outcome?

  • Aligned and clear objectives: These were established early on and used as guideposts when making decisions on how the alliance would be structured, the framework of the governance model, and dispute resolution.
  • Trust level needed to improve: We moved from a neutral level of trust following the decision to dismantle the SPMSD joint venture, through several stages of building trust rather quickly.  The MCM joint team is now truly at a partnership level, where we respect the differences in thinking and culture of both organizations. We have a shared vision for VAXELIS, conduct shared planning sessions among those that are assigned to the joint venture, and amicably resolve our differences.
  • Fairness: Partnerships need to be built on a true win-win basis. If during the negotiation one of the parties gets the impression of imbalance, the future and outcomes will be less certain; in a negotiation for a sustainable, long partnership, the goal is to find a balanced compromise.
  • Active sponsorship from senior leadership: Senior leaders are involved not only at the joint steering committee level, but routinely participate in team meetings for the joint venture, etc.  They make a concerted effort to be visible and support the joint venture.
  • Structure and governance: Established an effective and efficient governance framework, including team charters for all governance committees with clear and simplified operating principles, decision making, and escalation procedures. We made the decision to operate and build the partnership with a “biotech spirit” with a dedicated, limited team empowered to make decisions and move quickly.
  • Created a collaborative culture: The partners have shared values and behaviors such as: open, two-way communication among those that are assigned to the joint venture, agreement to disagree respectfully and address issues early, honor and respect of differences in company culture and approach, and operation in a transparent manner with respect to the joint venture.
  • MCM Annual Meeting: Merck Vaccines and Sanofi Pasteur conduct a global MCM annual meeting, which brings together the key staff supporting the joint venture to celebrate past year successes, share lessons learned, and plan for the upcoming year for VAXELIS. A good portion of the meeting time is dedicated to F2F governance meetings for the product.
  • Alliance health checks: These were conducted twice during the first 18 months, which helped us course correct. An important finding on the Merck side was that there were too many people partially involved in the JV, which was creating unnecessary complexity and communication. We streamlined the number of people involved in the alliance and asked for a higher percentage of their time.

See Part 2 of this blog post for further information on the 2019 ASAP Alliance Excellence Awards and the Merck Vaccine and Sanofi Pasteur alliance. And stay tuned for additional awards coverage on the ASAP blog and in the monthly and quarterly Strategic Alliance magazines.

Tags:  Alliance health checks  alliance management  ASAP Alliance Excellence Awards  biotech  Chris Scirrotto  collaborative culture  commercialization phase  dispute resolution  Eric Skjeveland  governance model  Jean-Phillipe Proust  joint venture  Merck Vaccines  negotiation  Sanofi Pasteur 

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Leaders ‘in a Time of Rapid Growth and Change’: Finalists for Announced for 2019 ASAP Alliance Excellence Awards

Posted By Noel B. Richards, Friday, February 15, 2019

Finalists Include Alcon Laboratories, Science Applications International Corporation, Keryx Biopharmaceuticals (subsidiary of Akebia Therapeutics), Thermo Fisher Scientific, Merck & Co., Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Cambridge Assessment English, Novartis, Incyte, Sanofi Pasteur, and Red Hat 

ASAP will honor companies and organizations, practices, and programs that exemplify exceptional performance in alliance management during the ASAP Alliance Excellence Awards ceremony at the 2019 ASAP Global Alliance Summit, which runs March 11-13 at the Westin Fort Lauderdale Beach Resort in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. This month, ASAP announced the companies that are 2019 Alliance Excellence Awards finalists: Alcon Laboratories, Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), Keryx Biopharmaceuticals (now a subsidiary of Akebia Therapeutics), Thermo Fisher Scientific, Merck & Co., Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Cambridge Assessment English, Novartis, Incyte, Sanofi Pasteur, and Red Hat. See the official press release issued via PRWeb.

“This remarkable group of companies has demonstrated significant leadership in alliance management during a time of rapid growth and change for business—and for the partnering profession,” said Michael Leonetti, president & CEO of ASAP. “Our awards committee reviewed a number of outstanding nominees from diverse industries this year, and we’re pleased to recognize these exceptional partners and programs whose success stories and practices can serve as models for the alliance management community.”

Alcon Laboratories’ alliance program contains a complete set of fully documented best practices supported by information technology tools. With a small alliance group, they manage many partners through consistency applying these practices and tools.

 

Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) has developed an alliance program covers not only the “hard” alliance elements, but also pays attention to the “softer” rules of the game, resulting in substantial contribution to revenues as well as recognition from partners. Partner tiering is consistently worked out across the strategic, financial, and relational elements of business.

 

Keryx Biopharmaceuticals (now a subsidiary of Akebia Therapeutics) and Thermo Fisher Scientific collaborated to resolve supply constraints to ensure that patients were able to access Keryx’s proprietary drug through agility and excellent teamwork at all levels of operation.

 

Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany–Bristol-Myers Squibb’s alliance has operated with financial transparency and consistent best practices since its formation in China in the 1990s, a time when the Chinese market was much less accessible.

 

Novartis–Incyte’s decade-long collaboration covers the co-marketing and co-development of an oncology drug in split geographical areas. The alliance has applied best practices across the alliance lifecycle, and led the way for a foundation for a broader alliance mindset in the respective organizations.


Merck & Co. and Sanofi Pasteur built a joint venture for a new drug utilizing a governance model inspired by small, nimble biotech companies to ensure speed and flexibility. The commercialization phase of the new drug so far is very successful.

 

Red Hat completely revamped an alliance training program for its alliance and channel managers, providing a clear learning path for everyone with several checkpoints and feedback options that support managers in their learning. The alliance program has leveraged e-learning and digitization, supported by well-designed management processes.

Cambridge Assessment English teamed up with Future Learn and Crisis Classroom to deliver an online training program for volunteers who help refugees meet refugee needs by focusing on language support. Volunteers (8,000 thus far have signed up) are able to exchange their experience in addition to accessing formal learning modules.

 

Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany developed its Joint Committee Self-Assessment tool after alliance surveys showed that decision-making in the organization’s alliances were too slow. This easily implemented tool helps committees improve their decision making has become standard in the Merck alliance toolkit.

Read the complete press release on PRWeb at http://www.prweb.com/releases/finalists_for_announced_for_2019_asap_alliance_excellence_awards/prweb16099885.htm. Stay tuned for much more coverage of the 2019 finalists and the stories behind their successes on this blog and in Strategic Alliance Quarterly and Monthly magazines.

Tags:  Akebia  Alcon  alliance  ASAP Alliance Excellence Awards  best practices  Bristol-Myers Squibb  Cambridge Assessment English  governance  Incyte  Keryx Biopharmaceuticals  Merck & Co.  Merck KGaA  Novartis  Red Hat  Sanofi Pasteur  Science Applications International Corporation  Thermo Fisher Scientific  toolkit 

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ASAP Summit Spotlight Leadership Forum Highlights Exceptional Contributions: Part 3—From Great Platforms to Epiphanies

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Thursday, August 17, 2017
Updated: Tuesday, August 15, 2017

The following is a continuation from Part 2 of the ASAP Summit Spotlight Leadership Forum Q&A Panel session, which took place last March at the 2017 ASAP Global Alliance Summit “Profit, Innovation, and Value for the Part­nering Enterprise,” held in San Diego, Calif. Highlighted on the podium for their exceptional company contributions were Celine Schillinger of Sanofi Pasteur; Chris Haskell of Bayer; Maria Olson of NetApp; and Kevin Hickey of BeyondTrust. The session was moderated by John W. DeWitt, CEO of JW DeWitt Business Communications and publisher and editor of ASAP Media and Strategic Alliance Magazine.  After DeWitt finished his questions, the audience jumped in with their own, one of which is included at the end of this post. 

Describe the greatest epiphany of your career, something that changed your worldview and made you a better executive or leader.

Maria: This was definitely an epiphany: I started working in the supply chain and felt like I was always in the trunk and someone else was driving. I wanted to get in the car. I had more value to give. I then tried product management and was lucky to work for a small division in telecom. I felt like a high tech janitor. And when you try to do everything, you don’t really do anything right to some degree. But in the end, that was all great training ground. My most challenging job, the one I didn’t like the most, was the most beneficial.

Chris: When you do the drug discovery business, 20 to 30 new drugs are approved each year. The more I stepped back, the more I realized my passion was about connecting and empowering rather than being an adventurer and discoverer. I began looking for ways to impact the company, writing strategies on how to create this hub, referring to how to move things along. And advancing the technology to beat cancer I get such joy out of being part of that.

Kevin: I worked for IBM and became one of the glorified gophers for the chairman’s office. Years later, I was sitting in a boardroom seeing a patient system that was broken. It was just so bad. It was a great and fabulous company, but at that point, I realized I wanted to go somewhere smaller.

Maria, FlexPod is a platform. Solutions die very quickly. You created a platform that was able to evolve, and you won an ASAP award several years ago because you took the time to get it right.

Maria: At NetApp, we do it similarly to what Kevin has described [see Part 2 of this blog series]. We step back, ask “what is the value we are delivering,” and hold ourselves to a higher level of thinking.

Celine: I would advocate to go faster and refrain from overthinking. In pharma, every step becomes huge and complicated. It’s as if it feeds itself with its own complexity. We spend more time building than actually doing it. It’s important to realize when perfection is needed, and when it is not.

Audience question from Luna of Belgium: How do you organize this? I understand that purpose, mastery, and a sense of perfection need to be everywhere. But do you create mastery throughout the organization, or do you create the silo for really good professionals? What is the tradeoff between mastery and autonomy? The silo is so natural for pharma.

Chris: Bayer went through a transformation of its alliance structure years ago. There are other parts of the organization in alliance management, and now we are starting to develop best practices and work with them. There are different frameworks within the organization. We’ve also started talking about rolling out trainings that we think are valuable for this transformation.

Maria: I work for companies where alliances are spread out, corporate strategic alliances are all over the map. HP brought the question to a leadership council and surveyed top strategic alliances. At the end of the day, [leadership recognized that] we need to stop having four to five people calling us from your company, and the decision they made was to pick new patterns from a management standpoint. It’s very different to manage everything strategically.

Kevin: It shouldn’t just be executives making decisions. You want to find the right people who have a great viewpoint, such as a systems engineer, and you pull them in. You need to find the knowledge workers to help your collaboration. You have to find the right people. Executives are not looking at all of the details every day.

Celine: There’s often a long debate in companies about quality belonging to the quality department. Actually, quality belongs to everyone who wants to own it. Co-create the purpose. It’s attractive to be co-owned. Anyone who feels they can contribute to the way we work is welcome. Boundaries become less important. What is important is how motivated and connected people are in the organization. Instead of appointing teams, we called for volunteers and asked why they wanted to lead the change initiative. We ended up with a team of 25. The jury, which is made up of half volunteers and half leaders, needed to focus on emotional intelligence and a willingness to help. It’s a peer-to-peer network. People want to make a difference. When you tap into this pool, you achieve miracles.

This concludes ASAP Media’s three-blog series covering the Spotlight Leadership Forum Q&A. You can read Part 1 and Part 2 here.  http://membersstrategicalliances.site-ym.com/blogpost/1143942/ASAP-Blog

Tags:  alliances  Bayer  BeyondTrust  Celine Schillinger  Chris Haskell  frameworks  Kevin Hickey  Maria Olson  NetApp  network  product management  Sanofi Pasteur  strategic alliances 

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ASAP Summit Spotlight Leadership Forum Highlights Exceptional Contributions: Part 2—Building Better Company Culture Through Collaboration

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Wednesday, August 16, 2017
Updated: Tuesday, August 15, 2017

The following is a continuation from Part 1 of the Spotlight Leadership Forum Q&A Panel session, which took place last March at the 2017 ASAP Global Alliance Summit “Profit, Innovation, and Value for the Part­nering Enterprise,” held at the San Diego Marriott Mission Valley, San Diego, California. Highlighted on the podium for their exceptional company contributions were Celine Schillinger of Sanofi Pasteur; Chris Haskell of Bayer; Maria Olson of NetApp; and Kevin Hickey of BeyondTrust. The session was moderated by John W. DeWitt, CEO of JW DeWitt Business Communications and publisher and editor of ASAP Media and Strategic Alliance Magazine, who plied the panel in this with questions on how to build better company culture and frameworks through partnering.

Kevin, when did that [collaboration] light bulb go off for you, or did you always get it? And as an chief executive, how do you drive your company to be more collaborative and successful in partnering?

Kevin: BeyondTrust is made up of nine different businesses. When we came in [to manage the newly combined companies], they had their own system. Our objective was to build the culture on the values we have, and determine what the benefits of the values are and the outcomes. … We tried to get everyone singing out of the same hymnals. We needed structural change, but it really was about culture, and it worked its way down. When we went forward, it was not just a “rah-rah” kick off. It’s was all about communications and driving it throughout the organization.

Maria: The executive team sets the culture of the organization. When I started at HP, it was very collaborative and had a consensus orientation. When I fast forward to some other companies I’ve been to, and it was command and control. The top-level team does set the tone. “Selective collaborations” is what I call it.

You also talked a lot about sales, Kevin. In highly competitive sales environments, there are big challenges. How do you change thought there?

Kevin: You need open communications and clear expectations with everyone in the organization. I don’t care what position you are in the company, if you don’t know how your job affects the company, it needs to start there. You have to be very collaborative, but at some point in time you have to say, “The train is leaving.” Smart people want to get to a decision and move on. Smart people say, if we make a mistake, we will own up to it, adjust, and move forward.

Celine: It’s the paradoxical junction between collaboration and performance via the carrot and stick. We put people in boxes, and it’s crazy. At the same time, research shows people are motived by autonomy, mastery, and purpose. So how do we try to evolve our company’s performance management system? Because of this desire for control, it infiltrates every function other than HR. If we can’t change that, how can we inspire people? How can we cope with the way organizations manage people and also focus attention on something elsethe excitement, the journey, etcetera. It’s not black and white, it’s complicated.

What are some of the strategies you deal with in terms of the need for speed, the need to have deliberation, to not be reactive. How can you balance that today?

Kevin: Sometimes you have to go slower to go faster. You want process. I do find that as a company, you’ll see the people who are doing the rework all the time. To me, you have to guide people to slow down and think about what they are trying to accomplish. All the mistakes I made when I went into partnering in the channel alliance business, it was a quick fix. It really takes thoughtful collaborating up front with people who have done it to get 85 percent of a plan agreed to. It will save you a ton of time on the back end.

For Part 1 in this series, please go here: http://www.strategic-alliances.org/blogpost/1143942/282809/ASAP-Summit-Spotlight-Leadership-Forum-Highlights-Exceptional-Contributions-Part-1-Inspiring-a-Movement-for-Change-Within-Your-Company . ASAP Media’s coverage of the Spotlight Leadership Forum Q&A continues in Part 3.

Tags:  BeyondTrust  Celine Schillinger  collaborations  collaborative  communications  Kevin Hickey  Maria Olson  NetApp  Sanofi Pasteur  strategies 

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