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A Primer from a Pro on How Nonverbal Cues Can Give You an Advantage in Negotiations and Other Business Transactions

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Friday, March 6, 2015

There were no nodding heads, yawns, or coffee breaks at the special 90-minute afternoon session presented March 4 by Dr. Jack Brown of The Body Language Group during the ASAP 2015 Global Alliance Summit held at the Hyatt Regency in Orlando, Florida, USA.  An expert in nonverbal communication, Brown spoke to a captivated audience about “Negotiation, Nuance, Conflict & Resolution—The Nonverbal Advantage.” A keen people-watcher for more than 25 years, he has consulted to C-suite executives, law enforcement, government, industries, and at universities, to name just a few clients. The advantages of reading body language in business transactions, partnerships, collaborations, and everyday exchanges can provide you with a big advantage, he says.

 

“Some 55 to 80 percent of communication is nonverbal,” Brown says. “Another 10 to 38 is paralanguage [an in-between category] … and 7 to 10 percent is verbal.” Understanding that breakdown and the associated communication nuances can help us become more powerful during negotiations, mediation, conflict resolution, and in exchanges in general.

 

Understanding body language can save you a lot of trouble down the road in your business transactions. Learning how to read a sociopath is invaluable, he quips. “Trust your gut … and run!” he advises, prompting a ripple of laughter from the audience. “Trust your gut”—the reoccurring mantra of his talk. “Be like a spy satellite or fighter pilot,” he continued, while flipping through slide after slide of facial and body cues –contrasting the cues of U.S. President Barack Obama to Russian President Vladimir Putin and spotlighting Hollywood stars.

 

“There’s a huge amount of information that we as a society ignore. … Younger people have good instincts, but we [adults] are really good at suppressing [them],” he adds.

“Women are better at it … they tend to be better communicators and nonverbal communicators.” Older people and animal lovers also have the touch. Nonverbal communication is innate and cross-cultural, but there are cultural differences for sure. For instance, at least from a western perspective, the Japanese tend to be the hardest to understand—they tend to have more idiosyncrasies, he says. 

 

Always look at multiple cues before assessing someone. One non-verbal cue isn’t enough for a conclusion. For alliance managers who communicate frequently via telephone—a topic that drew rapt attention—close your eyes, he suggests. Blocking out a sense can help you zero in more clearly on vocal cues without ever having to observe the other party. For in-person meetings, get a glass table, he advises.

 

For more information on the art of reading nonverbal communication in alliance management and business transactions, watch for forthcoming content in the ASAP Member e-News and Strategic Alliance Magazine, available as a benefit of membership in ASAP.

Tags:  ASAP 2015 Global Alliance Summit  ASAP Member e-News  collaborations  Conflict  Dr. Jack Brown  Negotiation  nonverbal communication  partnerships  Resolution  Strategic Alliance Magazine  The Body Language Group  vocal cues 

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Top 10 Reasons Why YOU Should Attend the March 2-5, 2015 ASAP Global Alliance Summit in Orlando

Posted By John W. DeWitt, Tuesday, February 24, 2015

In a recent blog post I called the ASAP community “real-life university on the leading edge of business practice.” School is in session next week, when ASAP’s real-world scholars and practitioners converge on Orlando, Florida USA for the 2015 ASAP Global Alliance Summit. Here are my Top 10 reasons why you don’t want to miss this unparalleled learning and networking opportunity.

 

10. Multiparty Partnering. Multiparty and coopetition alliances, cross-sector partnering, ecosystem management, and other sorts of complex, multiplayer collaborative models come to the fore at this year’s summit. These aren’t just big concepts—we’re now in the thick of actually managing (with increasing sophistication) these highly complex and chaotic types of partnering models. Two keynotes and multiple summit sessions delve deeply into cutting-edge models and how they play out in practice.

 

9. See Familiar Faces. A remarkable core of partnering and alliance professionals serves as the volunteer backbone of ASAP. These folks serve on the board and lead ASAP chapters around the world. They present at virtual and face-to-face events. And they attend ASAP conferences year in and out. You folks know who you are—and I for one can’t wait to see your familiar faces again this year!

 

8. Meet Fresh Faces. It’s great to see old friends—and also to make new ones. About half the folks who attend ASAP conferences are newbies. It’s an amazing opportunity to make new connections—and to welcome them into the heart of ASAP’s partnering, alliance management, and business collaboration community.

 

7. Notable Keynoters. Conferences are not just about great keynoters—but a great keynote address really sets the tone for a great conference. This year, as ASAP recently announced , we have two “out of this world” keynote speakers. Dale Ketcham, chief of strategic alliances for Space Florida, and Dr. Mark Rosenberg, president and CEO of The Task for Global Health, both will speak on Tuesday, March 3, during the global summit’s morning plenary session.

 

6. Channel Accounts Go Collaborative. Recent ASAP webinars and Strategic Alliance Magazine articles have honed in on the rapid convergence of practice between alliance and channel sales management. This year’s summit features multiple sessions on strategic account and channel account management—including a special 90-minute workshop addressing collaboration in the channel.

 

5. Partnering , Sales, Revenues. Indeed, sales and revenue matter more than ever to alliance executives—and conversely, business development and sales are rapidly morphing into highly collaborative functions that require business skills long since honed by the alliance management profession. Multiple sessions will delve into sales—including a recently announced case study presentation by Mission Pharmacal President of Commercial Operations Terry Herring, who will talk about restructuring a family-owned pharma company into a partnering—and sales—powerhouse.

 

4. A Higher Bar for Strategy. As partnering becomes ever more essential to our businesses and organizations, partnerships must deliver the goods and much more consistently fulfill their strategic intent. The keynotes and many sessions will address strategic challenges and opportunities. There’s even an entire track focused on “Leadership for Change Agents.”

 

3. The Win-Win Awards. Paragons of partnering—those who take alliance management to new heights—are recognized each year as finalists for the ASAP Alliance Excellence Awards. This year, awards will be presented in the categories of Individual Alliance Excellence, Alliance for Corporate Social Responsibility, Innovative Best Alliance Practice, and Alliance Program Excellence. Check the ASAP Blog later this week for our forthcoming announcement of the 2015 finalists.

 

2. Foundational Fundamentals. The annual ASAP Summit has always been a great place for new and less experienced alliance executives to glean incredible amounts of knowledge in a short amount of time. Experienced executives also find it valuable to bone up on the fundamentals. This learning immediately translates into real-world impact as you apply what you’ve learned to your daily job. In addition to tracks and sessions focused on foundational alliance management skills, there are also several in-depth workshops,including CA-AM and CSAP certification exam preparation workshops, a Lilly introduction to alliance management course, and Xerox’s brand new workshop on onboarding your high-tech partnership. 

 

1. Forging Collaboration’s Future. Want to know what’s coming down the pike—next? There’s no better window on the future of partnering and business collaboration than the 2015 ASAP Global Alliance Summit. And being at the Summit doesn’t just show you what to expect—it puts you in the driver’s seat to lead your organization through change and disruption. So come to Orlando and forge the future of partnering—from fundamentals to advanced practices! There’s still time to register and attend—even if you only can make it for a day. Click here and visit the summit website and register today!

 

I look forward to seeing you there! 

Tags:  2015 ASAP Global Alliance Summit  ASAP Alliance Excellence Awards  Dale Ketcham  Dr. Mark Rosenberg  Eli Lilly and Company  Mission Pharmacal  Multiparty Partnering  Professional Development Workshops  Space Florida  Strategic Alliance Magazine  Terry Herring  The Task for Global Health  Xerox 

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Partnering Goes Interplanetary—in the Pages of Strategic Alliance Magazine and onstage at the 2015 ASAP Global Alliance Summit

Posted By John W. DeWitt, Wednesday, February 18, 2015

[Excerpted from the forthcoming Q1 2015 Strategic Alliance Magazine]

 

What I enjoy most about the ASAP community is its raw intellectual rigor. It’s a real-life university on the leading edge of business practice—where the average grade is just 53%, based on success rates. It takes big thinking, by big thinkers—as well as professorial attention to the minutest detail—to succeed in the world of partnering, alliance management, and business collaboration.

 

Big ideas and the brains behind them converge in the pages of Strategic Alliance Magazine, at ASAP’s chapter and online events, and most powerfully at the annual ASAP Global Alliance Summit. As magazine publisher, moderator of many online events for ASAP, and frequent blogger on this site, I’ve gotten a good preview of what our community’s leading thinkers and practitioners will be talking about March 2-5 in Orlando. Two key discussion threads:

 

1. Strategy, sales, and revenue. Now partnering often gets its full due in “build, buy, or ally?” strategic decisions. But that puts alliance and partnering executives (many who also work in merger integration) on the spot: partnerships must deliver the goods and much more consistently fulfill their strategic intent. Yes, our well-developed alliance management practices and toolkits still matter, say Jan Twombly, CSAP, and Jeff Shuman, CSAP, Ph.D., in their January ASAP webinar and forthcoming summit session. But, they argue, our minds, skills, and tools must be leveraged much more strategically to improve our success managing mission-critical alliances, partner portfolios, and ecosystems. And what they say can be done. In one real-life case study about pushing alliance practice to that strategic level, Mission Pharmacal President Terry Herring will talk about restructuring a family-owned pharma company into a partnering—and sales—powerhouse.

 

Indeed, sales and revenue matter more than ever to alliance executives—and conversely, business development and sales are rapidly morphing into highly collaborative functions that require business skills long since honed by the alliance management profession. In recent ASAP webinars and Strategic Alliance Magazine articles, Norma Watenpaugh, CSAP, and Dede Haas, CSAP, have honed in on the rapid convergence of practice between alliance and channel sales management—and Haas will join Ann Trampas, CSAP, to share their latest findings during a special 90-minute workshop at the summit.  

 

2. Entrepreneurial business models and complex collaborations. Multiparty and coopetition alliances, cross-sector partnering, ecosystem management, and other sorts of complex, multiplayer collaborative models come to the fore at this year’s summit. These aren’t just big concepts—we’re now in the thick of actually managing (with increasing sophistication) these highly complex and chaotic types of partnering models. Two keynotes and multiple summit sessions delve deeply into cutting-edge models and how they play out in practice. Talk about big thinking: How about multi-party, multi-sector, coopetition partnerships tackling global health challenges—and government partnering with entrepreneurs to send tourists and asteroid miners into space?

 

Partnering and alliance management are truly in the thick of the fray in business—and the prominence of our role continues to grow in our companies and organizations. That’s why learning and events in the ASAP community remain so vital and relevant to our daily work. We, the professors and student-practitioners of partnering and alliance management, must keep on our toes—with one eye on the big picture and one focused on each pixel. Or you can bet some really smart millennial or entrepreneur will be stomping our toes and filling our shoes.

 

About the 2015 ASAP Global Alliance Summit

Held this year on March 2-5 at Hyatt Regency Orlando, the annual ASAP Global Alliance Summit is the world’s largest gathering of alliance, partnering, and business collaboration professionals. For more information or to register for this year’s summit, visit www.asapweb.org/summit. And be sure to visit this blog frequently during and after the Summit for the ASAP Media team’s live blog coverage of many event sessions.

Tags:  alliance management  ASAP Global Alliance Summit  collaboration  Dede Haas  Entrepreneurial  Jan Twombly  Jeff Shuman  Norma Watenpaugh  partnering  Strategic Alliance Magazine  Strategy 

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Q4 Sneak Preview of Strategic Alliance Magazine: Cloudy Days Ahead—The Channel Manager’s Role Becomes Collaborative as High Tech’s ‘Third Platform’ Accelerates Disruption

Posted By John W. DeWitt, Thursday, October 23, 2014

The forthcoming issue of Strategic Alliance Magazine takes an in-depth look at the changing role of the channel manager in today’s high tech industry—a business landscape that can look very much like the 100-foot North Atlantic waves in the movie “The Perfect Storm.”  

 

“Many seasoned channel managers have remarked that while disruptive technologies come and go, they’ve never seen anything quite like this. This disruption goes to the heart of the business model of many technology companies, and those companies and channel managers who don’t adapt are doomed,” writes Norma Watenpaugh, CSAP and principal of Phoenix Consulting Group, in our feature titled “Disrupting the Channel, or: ‘How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Cloud.’”

 

“To succeed, today’s channel executives must become savvy business managers—transitioning to new revenue models, finding new partners, and working collaboratively to understand and serve entirely new groups of customers outside of the information technology (IT) department,” writes Watenpaugh, citing Gartner data documenting “a tectonic shift in IT purchase decision making.” Twelve years ago, spending on IT outside of the IT department was only 20 percent of total technology spending. But by 2019, Gartner says, almost 90 percent of technology will be purchased by business lines, not the IT organization

 

“There are more buyer personas,” explains says Kristina Scott, manager of global channel marketing for Brocade, a data and storage networking company, and corporate member of ASAP. “Customers need the options explained in the language they understand.” Watenpaugh explains, “This means making the translation from technical benefits to business impact. These shifts are leading Brocade and other technology vendors to re-evaluate whether they have the right partners in their channel and what they can offer their current partners to gain new skills.”

 

Channel managers today increasingly must become savvy business managers who understand not just innovative and disruptive technologies, but also adaptive business models. Watenpaugh talks to IDC’s Steve White, program director of the Strategic Alliances Leadership Council at IDC, who says, “There are no rules! And failure doesn’t matter.” Reaction speed does matter, though. “Demand can be gone before you have all the planning done.”

 

Watenpaugh notes that the traditional start-up partnering model was to associate with big brand names to build credibility with customers. “Today, that may be a disadvantage,” according to White. “It is more important to find a likeminded partner with some synergy in the partnering opportunity and just go. Have some success or, if you fail, fail fast and move on.”

 

Learn more in the forthcoming Q4 2014 issue of Strategic Alliance Magazine, available as a free benefit to all ASAP members.

Tags:  Brocade  channel manager  Gartner  IDC  Kristina Scott  Norma Watenpaugh  Phoenix Consulting Group  Steve White  Strategic Alliance Magazine 

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Racing Down Memory Lane: World-Renowned Scientist Regales Audience with Tales from His Legendary Career at ASAP's 2014 BioPharma Conference

Posted By Rebekah L Fraser, Friday, September 5, 2014

Professor Bob Langer sprints through his opening keynote speech at ASAP's 2014 BioPharma Conference like Usain Bolt at the 2008 Olympics in Beijing. Considering the pace at which Langer racks up accomplishments, this is really no surprise.

 

Using examples from his career, the "Godfather of biotech," as one audience member later describes him, elucidates the goals he strives to reach in his MIT lab.  Working with current and former students, Langer develops platform technologies that can be used broadly by numerous product companies, including companies he established.  Publishing seminal papers in top journals helps spread the message about his work, and filing seminal patents help Langer protect his work and establish his legacy.   

 

If this all sounds like a lot, that's because it is.  With over 1050 patents and 250+ licenses or sub-licenses, it's entirely possible the man never sleeps.  Despite his tremendous and groundbreaking accomplishments, Langer appears humble.  He reputedly responds to emails within an hour - not just from folks at the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation with whom he works (FYI, he works directly with the foundation's namesakes, as illustrated in a photo slide). Nor does he save his speedy responses solely for stars like Jennifer Aniston (spokesmodel for the haircare line he formulated with professor Dan Anderson, for their company Living Proof)... In fact, Langer responds to ALL email within an hour - from students, prospective students, and yes, from the Managing Editor of a humble professional publication called Strategic Alliance Magazine.  We conducted our first interview via email and voicemail.  I sent the questions via email.  He responded by voicemail, in a series of rapid-fire messages addressing each and every question and offering further assistance if needed.  It wasn't; he's articulate, even at high speed.

 

Scientists have the reputation for being obtuse, for communicating only in the language of their specialty, for being unaware when an outsider is missing the salient points.  Langer has come a long way. His first speech in 8th grade went so badly he avoided public speaking for over a decade until he was forced to present his post-doctoral research in a twenty-minute speech to senior scientists who roundly rejected the work as impossible. Today, he speaks with refreshing eloquence.

 

Perhaps this is why he also manages to establish flourishing alliances.  Or perhaps, as Langer suggests, his alliances thrive largely because of the champions at each partner organization who either officially or unofficially manage the alliance.

 

As the chemical engineer/professor/inventor/entrepreneur whizzes through 70-plus slides and two short videos showcasing his work, I feel like I'm on a bullet train watching billboards flash by my window. It's mesmerizing, but I tear my gaze away to scan the room.  Familiar facesLena Frank, CSAP, Steve Twait, CSAP, Dave Thompson, CA-AM, Jeremy Ahouse, CSAP, PhD gaze upon the presenter with similar rapture.  

 

If there's one theme in Langer's work, other than the desire to save or enhance lives via science, it's that he has managed to plow through challenges others believed were insurmountable.  "People believed it couldn't be done," he says more than once. 

 

The results? A microchip with wells of drugs for implantation; porous aerosol delivery of drugs; glycoforms with better specificity, biological efficacy, half-life, stability, absorption and elimination time; and nano-particles used to zap breast and lung tumors, have earned Langer Lab, or one of the numerous companies Langer has established, deals with pharma players including Amgen, Pfizer, Astra Zeneca, Hoffman LaRoche and Sanofi.  I guess you could say he's been modestly successful.

 

When the presentation ends, the conference planning committee chair, Jan Twombly, CSAP, rises and invites the audience to ask questions. We sit in stunned silence.

 

"None?" Twombly asks sheepishly. 

 

Finally, a voice rises from the back of the room: "How, specifically, do you collaborate?"

 

Langer explains, "Our lab is interdisciplinary. My goal is to have people make an idea factory, where we can invent stuff, write great papers and make great patents.  If we go the next step, usually, companies think it's too early to collaborate with us at that stage.  Sanofi is an exception."

 

Now, the god-like scientist exposes his Achilles heel - the fear that if his main contact at Sanofi is ever transferred out of Boston, their collaborations may not be as good.  "It's a skillset," he says.  "A new person comes in, and... I think it's hard to do. There's always people interacting back and forth. Sometimes, we hire somebody just to do the management of an alliance." 

 

We, the audience, take in the "godfather of biotech's" last admission, again in complete silence. 

 

"I think you have wowed the audience," Twombly states.

 

"I don't know," Langer replies modestly.  "I think they're probably hungry."

Tags:  Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation  Living Proof  MIT lab  Professor Bob Langer  Strategic Alliance Magazine 

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