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Building and Sustaining the Alliance-Enabled Enterprise—Through the Lens of Vantage Partner’s Stu Kliman

Posted By Genevieve Fraser, Tuesday, February 28, 2017
Updated: Monday, February 27, 2017

Building broad-based organizational partnering capabilities that are strongly embedded within and across your firm’s partnerships can be daunting in the face of an increasingly complex web of multi-industry alliances. Take your partnering capabilities to a new level with advice on how to manage just this kind of challenge at the 2017 ASAP Global Alliance Summit, “Profit, Innovation, and Value for the Part­nering Enterprise,” Feb. 28-March 2 at the San Diego Marriott Mission Valley, San Diego, Calif. USA.

 

Stuart Kliman, CA-AM, a founding partner of Vantage Partners LLC, and co-author of Vantage’s 2015 study, “Transcending Organizational Barriers—A Cross-Industry View of Alliance Management Trends and Challenges,” will build upon this research in his two-hour long workshop, “Building and Sustaining the Alliance-Enabled Enterprise.”  Kliman manages Vantage’s alliance practice area and is a regular speaker and writer on alliance and key supplier relationship management.

 

This year, Kliman will be co-running the workshop with Julie Shirley, executive, strategic alliances for financial services and technology at Equifax, who will share how the concepts highlighted by Kliman have enabled Equifax’s alliance success. Shirley leads a team of alliance partnering specialists that strives to maximize value from Equifax’s partnerships and to institutionalize partnering and alliance management capability at Equifax. Previously, Shirley was deputy general counsel for Equifax.

 

Organizations need to remain agile to effectively engage in key alliances as new technologies appear that can disrupt as well as assist. Alliance managers, in particular, can help enable an enterprise-wide mindset for driving innovation through partnerships to maximize value for all stakeholders. The session promises to be a highly interactive workshop that addresses a range of challenges while exploring both normative and sub-par organizational approaches for partnering. It will also focus on a framework to assess an organization’s partnering capabilities.

 

The creation of a sustainable, “alliance-enabled” enterprise is key to succeed. “If you have an alliance-dependent strategy, then your entire organization, including, of course, your management team, needs to be focused on supporting it,” according to Kliman.

Organizations must shift from their traditional, inwardly focused foundations to embrace externally focused strategic assumptions for winning, and in the process, embed an operating model and culture befitting a world-class partner.


“A framework for assessing your organization’s broad-based partnering capabilities would look at those aspects of an organization that ultimately lead to behaviors and results—such as core assumptions that the organization has about how it wins, organizational design, key processes and tools, explicit and implicit incentives, roles and responsibilities, and skills,” he adds.


The discussion will focus on the difference between organizations that are designed to succeed at external partnering and those that are not. It also will drill down on how the partnering capability of an organization might be designed in a meaningful and impactful way, and the role that alliance management organizations can play to ensure that their companies are truly prepared to execute a partner-dependent strategy.


“Alliance management organizations far too often are focused on the mechanical aspects of making individual alliances work,” Kliman states. “Instead, they need to be more focused on ensuring that the organization itself is designed to support its alliance dependent-strategy, if indeed that is the strategy the organization has.”


The session also will include roundtable discussions and sharing of ideas across the broader group, during which participants can engage with their colleagues to discuss barriers they've experienced to building a true alliance-enabled organization and brainstorm changes necessary to reach that goal.

Tags:  Alliance Management  alliance managers  cross-industry  partnering  strategy  Stu Kliman  Trends and Challenges  Vantage Partners 

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New ASAP Corporate Member Bridge Partners Helps Industries Connect for More Successful Partnering

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Tuesday, December 20, 2016

This is one in a series of blog posts welcoming seven new corporate members into the ASAP fold. Bridge Partners practices “the art and science of business transformation” by helping customers address challenges, adapt to change, empower teams, and win in the marketplace. Channel transformation is one of the most crucial challenges enterprises need to address, says Chase Morgan, a partner at the company. Bridge Partners specializes in technology sector trends and provides deep, hands-on experience in alliance strategy, business planning, joint sales initiatives, enablement, and analytics. The company also provides specialized practices in the following areas: sales and channel; digital; operations and technology; people and change; product and solution marketing; program and project leadership. Morgan provided the following additional information about the new ASAP corporate member:

What inspired your team to join ASAP at the corporate level?
I was fortunate to be an ASAP member when I ran global ISV [independent software vendor] relationships at a large software company. Because we are serious about our channel transformation practice, it only made sense to join ASAP. It's the place to be to obtain valuable information on partnering practices.

How do you anticipate the ASAP corporate membership benefitting you and your team?
ASAP is the perfect gathering place to network and for consultants to exchange ideas with the most experienced alliance leadership in the world. We strive for continuous learning and are committed to providing service back to the communities with which we engage. We also look forward to developing new relationships with potential clients and partners and enhancing the ones we have through ASAP best practices.

 

Please share a bit of additional background information on your company. 
Since 2006, Bridge Partners has distinguished itself as a national leader in business consulting with offices in Seattle, San Francisco, Chicago, Dallas-Fort Worth and Austin. The quality of our work is nationally recognized, and the company consistently ranks as one of the fastest growing businesses in America. It has made the Inc. 5000 list for five consecutive years. Our real-world experience and unwavering commitment to services means our client’s business successfully moves forward under a highly skilled management team.


What sets Bridge Partners apart from similar consulting companies?
 

Bridge Partners has a unique collaborative business model that connects local knowledge with a national presence. We deliver results for a wide range of companies: from Fortune 50 to start-up; technology and manufacturing to healthcare and transportation. Our consultants deliver insightful strategy, meticulous planning, and creative thinking.

Tags:  alliance  analytics  Bridge Partners  Channel transformation  Chase Morgan  collaborative business model  creative thinking  digital  enablement  joint sales initiatives  leadership  marketing  marketplace  network  planning  strategy 

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Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Sailor—Effectively Employing the Breadth of People in Your Alliance

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Wednesday, September 7, 2016
Updated: Tuesday, September 6, 2016

To maximize the value of an alliance, it’s important to effectively employ and appreciate the full mix of participantsfrom your sidekick partner to the trainer and sponsor in the background.  That was the focus of the session “People, Process, Culture: Building a Winning Alliance Program” at the 2016 ASAP Global Alliance Summit, “Partnering Everywhere: Expert Leadership for the Eco­system,” at the Gaylord National Resort & Convention Center, National Harbor, Maryland. The discussion was led by three individuals who built highly successful collaborative programs from scratch: Joe Havrilla, senior vice president and global head of business development & licensing, Bayer Pharmaceuticals; Gerry Dehkes, CSAP, global cyber ecosystem lead at Booz Allen Hamilton; David Erienborn, CSAP, director of strategic alliances at KPMG. During the session, they spent a considerable amount of time plying the question of how to create a thriving dynamic between your alliance team, partners, and even ex-partners. 

Joe: At the end of the day, the strategy is about people. Microsoft and KPMG are not going to do anything, since they do not exist other than in our heads they are not going to do anything. You only have the beginning of a strategy until you have taken your strategy from the company down to the people. People come into work not to execute a strategy; they come in with their own strategy. So how do I align their strategy to our best interests? In some cases, you also may need to work with the ex-partner.  If you understand ahead of time where you are in conflict with the other company, you can design a way of working together. 

Gerald: Here’s the approach we took, which is the secret sauce of this particular alliance program. Typically an alliance director will talk with partners and service leaders, and then bring in sales people. We realized the benefit of 10-20 alliance managerswith each trying to get to that sales forceand decided to take that part of the organization and organize it around the industry groups. Really position the alliance enablement person, and they would have only one person to go to. We found that to be very effective, those folks became part of the team. They decided strategies, winning alliance-based offers, they would always be there for that industry. That model helped us become successful. It’s that last piece that’s criticalgetting those alliances out to sales-facing people. 

David: It’s important that training people understand what they are trying to accomplish. If you can translate alliances at a company level down into the mind of the educators, and that this whole alliance is to get them to do something, they become aware of the importance of training to do something. It’s important for them to know this is the strategy. How do you set this up so they get visibility and appreciation? You need to make the training people a winner. 

Joe: You need to know the difference between sales and revenue, understand what margin is, and understand that finance people will be called on for estimates. If I include them from the beginning, I am a lot more likely to get their support when I need it. Another group that is important to your alliance are the sponsors. I’m an advocate and agent, but not the sponsor. They can bring resources to bear and spend time on building relationships. The alliance should be one of their top four priorities for their year. They have to be someone who can really step up. There aren’t any sponsor schools, they’ve never been trained to do it. We need to help sponsors understand what their job is, invest time in it, determine who can be a sponsor, and make sure they have the training to do it. 

Gerald: You need to define the elements of value that all the partners are looking for. It’s not a specific part of the agreement or financial transaction, yet it’s a strongly held expectation of the partner. If you don’t clarify that up front, you wind up being surprised. If there was an expectation that was discussed earlier, but you never codified the agreement or the people responsible for executing the agreement, then you have disconnect and conflict. It’s important that somebody is capturing the expectations. The other tool that is helpful upfront is to do a partner fit as part of due diligence. When you start with a rigorous checklist approach on partner resources, decision process, internal policies and procedures, you can mitigate conflicts down the road. 

David: Trust is predictability. I don’t trust my 15 year old to drive a car because I can’t predict. So we do a lot of trust building. As you get more of your people out there dealing with partners, you have to educate them and give them the boundary conditions, not to restrain them, but you want a consistent approach. You want enough leeway to solve problems. You don’t want to inhibit them from creativity, but you want predictability. 

Tags:  agreement  alignment  alliance team  Bayer Pharmaceuticals  CSAP  David Erienborn  Gerry Dehkes  Joe Havrilla  KPMG  sales  sponsors  strategies  strategy  Trust 

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Ben Gomes-Casseres and the Bayer Team Return to the 2016 ASAP BioPharma Conference with an Interactive Roundtable on Creating Alliance Success

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Tuesday, September 6, 2016

One session at last year’s ASAP BioPharma Conference was such a success that Ben Gomes-Casseres, CSAP, DBA, and the Bayer HealthCare team are returning with the same theme in a new interactive roundtable format. Their deep dive on “Making Better Alliances: How Alliance Management, Business Development, and Legal Can Collaborate More Effectively” will delve into how to successful integrate alliance management, business development, and the legal division to improve alliance success rates.  They return to the stage for this year’s ASAP BioPharma Conference Sept. 7-9 “New Faces, Unexpected Places in Partnering: The Foresight to Lead, the Foundation to Succeed” at the Revere Hotel, Boston Common, Boston.

 

An alliance strategy consultant, professor at Brandeis University in Waltham, Mass., and author, Gomes-Casseres will be moderating the session with Bayer award-winning cross-functional team of John A. Calvo, Karen Denton, CA-AM, and Claudia Karnbach problem-solving an alliance management case. Attendees will be participants, too, tackling tricky alliance scenarios with best practices through dynamic peer-to-peer exchanges. I asked Gomes-Casseres a few questions about the impetus for the session.

 

What are the most common reasons for the high failure rate of alliances?

As a community, we have made great strides in alliance management, but we have been myopic. We need to broaden our view so that we can see more clearly the faults in alliance strategy and design that frequently lead to dissolution.

The reason half of all alliances fail can be largely attributed to poor up-front design, which includes: 

  • Choosing the wrong partner
  • Deciding to partner for the wrong reasons
  • Flawed contract terms

Part of the problem is that alliance management is left out of the early decision process. Part of it also is that alliance management, business development, and legal speak different languages and concerns. Making a robust alliance requires effective collaboration between business development, legal, and alliance management. However, this aspect of internal collaboration often receives less attention from alliance managers than the work they perform after the deal is “done.” That’s one component in critical need of change to improve the success rate.

What solutions will you and the Bayer panel be recommending in your session? 

At the 2015 BioPharma Conference last year, I held a session with Bayer Healthcare executives from alliance management, business development, and the legal division that focused on four areas: 

  • How Bayer’s does the “Deal to Alliance” process, which is a way of describing how to pay attention to both alliance strategy and management
  • The importance of involving alliance management early on in the deal
  • The contributions alliance management makes to negotiation and contract terms
  • How combining these elements builds more robust alliances

This year, I invited the same team that provided a session at the BioPharma Conference last year to come back and work in an interactive continuation of that session with participants. We plan to quickly rehash what was covered last year and then do a deep dive into fresh and innovative approaches. We plan to share a case study and explore in open discussion how to solve it. In the process, participants will learn how alliance management can contribute to business development and contracting and the best way to bring the D2A process back to their own companies.

 What is your goal of the session for participants?

 The goal is simple but essential to having a solid alliance. We want to:

  • Make more robust and quicker alliances
  • Resolve the differences of perspective among functions in alliance design
  • Broaden the role of alliance management in the organization

How does your new book Remix Strategy: The Three Laws of Business Combinations, published by Harvard Business Review Press, promote some of these ideas?

 Remix Strategy provides the tools to fix this problem. The solution lies in designing alliances so that they can be governed effectively to create value. I call it the “Deal to Alliance” process, which means paying attention to both alliance strategy and management. For a healthy alliance, it’s critical to integrate the process of designing and implementing alliances along their full lifecycle.

Tags:  alliance management  alliances  ASAP BioPharma Conference  Bayer HealthCare  Ben Gomes-Casseres  business development  Claudia Karnbach  collaboration  John A. Calvo  Karen Denton  Keywords: Remix Strategy  management  patner  strategy 

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ASAP’s New “Quick Takes” Explore Impact of IoT and Ecosystem Partnering—and Proves to Be a Highly Successful Format for Engaging 2016 Summit Participants

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson & John DeWitt, Friday, March 18, 2016

Some forms of communication are more effective than others. The “TED Talks” speaking format, for example, has drawn significant numbers of interested viewers for over 30 years. That is why ASAP decided to introduce its new “ASAP Quick Takes,” patterned after the “TED Talks,” unveiling them for the first time at the 2015 ASAP Biopharma Conference, and again, at the 2016 ASAP Global Alliance Summit. 

The talks were a big hit and garnered lots of positive feedback. Such short talks are successful for several reasons: The message is sometimes simple, imaginative, and an easy take-away; the time limit of about 20 minutes forces speakers to distill the main points, which more-readily captivates the audience. 

Take, for example, John Bell’s “Quick Takes” talk where the marketing executive for strategy development at Johnson & Johnson Consumer Health advised a collaborative approach: “Play in the sandbox. We are sitting on massive scale of opportunity to work in open innovation,” he said. “The toys must be shared. You can’t have it all your way, and you must behave yourself,” he added, while outlining the rules for success in today’s partnering environment. “Today, it’s a whole playground! Amusement parks, even. You can do many things [with] so many kids to play with. Which one would you choose, and why would they play with you?” he asked provocatively, prompting the audience to join him in the creative box for 20 minutes. 

Bell’s invitation was a terrific precursor to the talk by Larry Walsh, CEO of The 2112 Group and a well-known journalist, who asked the audience to join him in a virtual chess game. Strategy is a key component of success, he said. “Strategy is about making choices. If you fail to make choices, you often put yourself at risk,” he continued. “Lots of businesses say they make choices, but they are consumed by revenue generation and don’t discriminate between good and bad decisions. They also fail to anticipate. This is where surveying the landscape equates with chess. If you don’t survey the landscape and understand your competition, you cannot anticipate what the opposition will do,” he noted. Among other things, “you need to lay traps and position assets to create advantages.” 

Think ahead and read the board, he advised. Not only what you are going to do, but what your opponent is going to do. Chess helps you to play by the rules and take responsibility for your actionsto problem-solve in an uncertain environment.” 

Another “Quick Talks” speaker, Anne Nelson of IBM Watson, threw out an elaborate blueprint for success for IoT multi-partnering. IBM’s new business unit, formed in 2014, has seen astronomical growthsome 500 new partners in just two years. The IBM Watson Group provides over 30 services that partners can write applications against or leverage to improve applications. “What did you tweet over the last two weeks?” she asked the audience to recall. “Watson can provide personality insights from those tweets” and generate different coupons for discounts depending on that profile. “We are opening the platform to partners on data as well,” she replied. ‘This platform is the only one in the industry today with this many apps.” 

What’s the value for partners in alliances with IBM in the Watson ecosystem? “We’re the number one B2B brand, Watson has 70 percent unaided awareness—so brand is going gangbusters in terms of value to partners,” said Nelson, who was recruited to IBM Watson Group from IBM’s direct sales organization in January of 2015. “We have over 40,000 IBM sellers who touch millions of accounts,” she noted. 

For a longer-term view of success, Marcus Wilson, president and co-founder of Anthem’s real-world research subsidiary, HealthCore, Inc., spoke about his 20-plus years building healthcare partnerships. The key component is building trust, he said. His experience included pioneered the emergence of physician and patient education and clinical decision support services based upon real-world data. Wilson’s experience exemplifies the “kind of creativity and entrepreneur skill increasingly required when we are reinventing what we are doing all the time,” said Jan Twombly, CSAP, ASAP chairman of programming, and president of The Rhythm of Business, who prefaced the talks as moderator. 

As an entrepreneur and “intrapreneur,” Wilson shared several formative personal experiences, starting as a young clinical pharmacist doing his residency at a Blue Cross/Blue Shield of Delaware health center. “Influence is everything,” Wilson emphasized. “I had no power to prescribeI would have to walk into physicians’ offices and convince them that it was their idea to treat the way they should. I had to influence the healthcare center to offer all these new services—which eventually became incredible force for us.” Similarly, he said, “We met with FDA 10 years ago about real-world evidence. They said, that’s great, but this stuff is voodoo science.” Thanks to influence—reinforced by lots of data—“it’s becoming much more mainstream today.” 

You can read individual blog posts about these “Quick Takes” talks on our website at http://www.strategic-alliances.org/blogpost/1143942/ASAP-Blog.

Tags:  alliances  Ann Nelson  ASAP Quick Takes  assets  B2B brand  collaborative  healthcare partnerships  Heathcore Inc.  IBM Watson  IoT  John Bell  Johnson & Johnson Consumer Health  Larry Walsh  Marcus Wilson  multi-partnering  open innovation  partnering environment  problem solve  strategy  TED Talks  The 2112 Group 

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