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2018 ASAP Global Alliance Summit To Provide New Business Perspectives and Proven Leadership Practices

Posted By John W. DeWitt and Cynthia Hansen, Tuesday, December 19, 2017

Some 50-plus seasoned alliance managers and business insiders to share their know-how and valuable content in the form of sessions, workshops, talks, and panel discussions from 35-plus leading companies, educational institutions, and consultancies

The Association of Strategic Alliance Professionals (ASAP), an international association dedicated to the leadership and practice of alliance management, partnering, and business collaboration, announced the theme for the 2018 Global Alliance Summit: “Propelling Partnering for the On-Demand World: New Perspectives + Proven Practices for Collaborative Business,” to be held March 26-28 in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, USA. The largest international management education opportunity of its kind, participants have access to the latest trends in the profession from a range of leading industry thought leaders providing groundbreaking talks, practical workshops, and cutting-edge sessions.

The 2018 Summit particularly emphasizes programming for veteran alliance mangers that focuses on how to apply leading edge practices and seasoned know- how at a time of considerable change with increasing multi-industry partnering. The thought leaders representing numerous industry verticals will include influential c-level and senior executives from Fortune 100 and 500 companies.

The Summit will provide a rich mix of:

  • Fifty-plus facilitators, speakers, and panelists representing 35-plus industry-leading companies, educational institutions, and consultancies
  • Twenty-eight education sessions and in-conference workshops
  • Ten-plus hours of business development and networking opportunities
  • Eight different in-conference tracks
  • Six pre-conference workshops
  • A biopharma leadership panel session
  • The renowned ASAP Alliance Excellence Awards ceremony
  • Ample networking opportunities and an engaging roundtable session

Strong international participation in past Summits has created a diverse, global, cross-cultural climate with 25 percent attendance from countries such as Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, China, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, India, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom.

The Summit is offering intensive leadership-related pre-conference workshops Monday, March 26, on topics such as ASAP’s newly launched in-house TE-AM Training, another on overcoming obstacles and conflict, leveraging the new ISO 44001 Collaborative Business Relationship Management Standard, Game Theory in strategic decision making and negotiations, Alliance Management 201 as a follow-up to the 101 session, and CA-AM exam preparation.

The event will start off Tuesday, March 27, with a timely keynote address by tech insider Tim Minahan, senior vice president of business strategy and chief marketing officer at Citrix. A leader in global marketing strategy and operations, he is responsible for securely deliver the world's most important apps and data. A tech eclectic, Minahan has served in a broad range of business leadership roles at leading enterprise software, cloud, and services firms. He is particularly adept at defining new markets and positioning companies to own them. He previously spearheaded SAP's successful transition to the cloud as CMO of the company's cloud and line-of-business unit. He joined SAP when the company acquired Ariba, where he was Ariba’s global CMO and senior vice president of business network strategy where he led the commercial strategy for the Ariba Network, the world's largest and most global business network. He also oversaw the design and execution of go-to-market programs and marketing initiatives to fuel Ariba’s growth as a leading cloud company. 

Before the day’s close, attendees will be privy to the winners of the ASAP Alliance Excellence Awards, a big favorite as companies are honored for their alliance capabilities in specific categories. The Summit will also highlight four scheduled plenaries from top-level speakers: two from pharma companies, including Mark Noguchi, Roche’s VP and global head of alliances and asset management and Lucinda Warren, VP, business development, neuroscience at Johnson & Johnson Innovation; two from high tech companies, including Russ Cobb, global VP of alliances and channels at SAS and Wayne Usie, senior vice president & chief market development officer at JDA Software. The remainder of the Summit will include a wide variety of sessions in eight different tracks that are geared toward enhancing alliance performance, such as the life sciences, tech, and leadership. The Summit will be strongly weighted toward higher-level alliance education, such as how to think strategically and how to drive collaborative leadership throughout an organization. A new, particularly strong leadership panel session will be comprised of biopharma executives David Thompson, CA-AM, CAO at Eli Lilly and Company; Mark Noguchi, VP and global head of alliances and asset management at Roche; Casey Caperelli, head of alliance and integration management at Amgen; Nancy Griffin, CA-AM, VP of alliances with Novartis.

Attendees can expect to receive strong content from recurring Summit rainmakers, such as:

  • Ben Gomes-Casseres, CSAP, Brandeis University and author of Remix Strategy partnered with Greg McGahan, PwC deals partner and alliances/joint venture practice leader, in their session “Alliances in Corporate Development: Back to the Future?”  
  • Stuart Kliman, a partner and head of alliance management practice at Vantage Partners with “Realizing the Value of Non-Traditional Partnerships in Pharma/Biotech and Technology”
  • Jan Twombly, CSAP, president, The Rhythm of Business, and Jeff Shuman, CSAP, principal, The Rhythm of Business, and professor of management, Bentley University with “Joint Development of Complex Solutions Requires Extreme Partnering”  
  • Joe Schramm, vice president strategic alliances, BeyondTrust, and Morgan Wheaton, senior director, global partner alliances & channels, JDA Software with Partnering with Change in a World of Ongoing Disruption”
  • Dr. Ard-Pieter de Man, CSAP, School of Business and Economics, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam with “Building Your Collaborative Business Model”

Additionally, a mix of sessions will be providing strategic perspectives and management insights in a range of industries, such as:

  • “Architecting for Transformation: The Next Generation Partner Ecosystem,” by Russ Cobb, global vice president alliances and channels, SAS Institute, and Norma Watenpaugh, CSAP, founding principal, Phoenix Consulting Group
  • “How to Optimize Value and Gracefully End Alliance Relationships,” by Jeff Hurley, CA-AM, alliance management director, Eli Lilly and Company, and Ron McRae, CSAP, director of alliance management, Janssen Biotech
  • “Alliance Management: A Growing, Enterprise-wide Activity,” by Karen Denton, CA-AM, alliance management director, BD&L alliance management, Bayer Pharmaceuticals, and Christoph Huwe, CA-AM, PhD, strategic alliance manager therapeutics, global external innovation & alliances, Bayer Pharmaceuticals
  • “Centralized vs. Decentralized Alliance Organizations: How to Survive and Thrive in Both Ecosystems!”, by Tony DeSpirito, CSAP, vice president/general manager of operation services, Schneider Electric, and Scott San Antonio, CA-AM, global director for IoT and edge compute alliances, Schneider Electric

This is a representative selection of what’s on the docket. For more information about the Summit keynote, agenda, sessions, workshops, and other programming, go to: http://asapsummit.org/.

Tags:  Amgen  Bayer  Casey Caperelli  Cindy Warren  Citrix  Eli Lilly and Company  Janssen Biotech  Jeff Hurley  Joe Schramm  Johnson and Johnson Innovation  Karen Denton  Mark Noguchi  Nancy Griffin  Novartis  Roche  Ron McRae  Russ Cobb  SAS Institute  Schneider Electric  Tim Minahan  Tony DeSpirito  Wayne Usie 

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How to Manage Mega-scale Partnering in the Era of the Internet of Things from the Vantage Point of Schneider Electric

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Thursday, January 28, 2016

When it comes to Schneider Electric, the company operates in a seemingly unlimited world of opportunities for establishing connections. Its partnering mantra seems to be “think globally and act locally, globally, and everywhere in between.” 

Now add the Internet of Things, and Schneider is broadening its scope to partner in complex and creative ways with some of the biggest companies in the world, such as Cisco Systems, Microsoft, and IBM Corporation. That’s the topic Anthony DeSpirito, CSAP, managing director, strategic accounts at Schneider Electric, is scheduled to address during the panel discussion “Capturing the Value of the Internet of Things” March 1–4, 2016, at the ASAP Global Alliance Summit “Partnering Everywhere: Expert Leadership for the Ecosystem,” at the Gaylord National Resort & Convention Center, National Harbor, Maryland, USA. The discussion will focus on generating revenue from the complex partnering and business models driven by IoT. Other participants scheduled for the panel discussion are Nancy M. Green, global practice lead, healthcare strategy & thought leadership, at Verizon  Enterprise Solutions and Joan Meltzer, CSAP, smarter cities go-to-market leader at IBM Analytics, IBM Corporation. 

Schneider currently manages more than $30 billion in energy for 4,500 clients in 147 countries. The company integrates solutions in large numbers of physical structures, such as electrical and SCADA systems (data acquisitions and control systems for power or water treatment systems), and has access to vast amounts of data about the physical environment. The information is then provided to an analytics platform that turns physical data into information that allows partners, such as Verizon and IBM, to make better-informed decisions. 

Such complex, mega-scale strategic alliances require large teams and significant investments of time for planning. Schneider has 14 alliance managers. Key components need to fall into place for mega-partnership to fly: “Alignment is absolutely critical at the executive level,” DeSpirito pointed out during a recent interview.

 

For example, Schneider’s alliance with IBM to provide cutting-edge cloud services for the utility industries required the fundamental first step of having problem-solving meetings at the executive vice president level. “Once they agreed, it … cascaded throughout the organizations. Now the sales areas have agreement, and there is a cadence of communications between the two teams doing workshops and basic education. Now we need to bring discipline and cadence through quarterly business reviews,” he explained.

 

The early-stage, innovative ADMS cloud-based service solution could radically change the utility industry if it gains regulatory approval because it could provide services to utilities that can’t afford ADMS as a stand-alone product. Electrical power plants use a distribution management software system called DMS that allows them to be efficient in production and distribution. Schneider’s system is ADMS, where “A” stands for Advanced. The system is “much more customizable, much more efficient, and allows a utility to become more productive,” he says. If a proof of concept with ADMS that is underway in Canada is successful, “we anticipate it will move into production, … which should manifest itself in lower operation costs, cheaper electric, and allow us to go to smaller utilities,” he explained.

 

From a partnering standpoint, this is a brand new business model, and also an example of the complex alliance management planning often required in large company alliances, DeSpirito added. “This is not just buying and selling software and space in a data center.”

Tags:  ADMS  alliance management  alliances  Cisco Systems  cloud  DMS  electrical and SCADA systems  IBM Corporation  IoT  Joan Meltzer  Microsoft  Nancy M. Green  Schneider Electric  Tony DeSpirito  utilities  utility industry  Verizon Enterprise Solutions 

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Keeping Pace with the Internet of Things: Walking the Post-Disruption Walk While Transforming Partnerships

Posted By Cynthia Hanson, Monday, March 23, 2015

Like Mickey’s brooms in the film “Fantasia,” the Internet of Things has multiplied into a labyrinth of complexity accompanied by its companion—disruption. “As disruptive technology takes hold, companies not used to partnering together are forced to do so, and it’s up to alliance managers to forge these alliances as leaders and define the swim lanes between companies,” said Tony DeSpirito, vice president of global alliances at Schneider Electric during the session on “Transforming Partnering Post Disruption” at the 2015 ASAP Global Alliance Summit held at the Hyatt Regency in Orlando, Florida, USA. 

 

“The greatest challenge we are facing right now as we look forward strategically is issues around the Internet of Things—I’m talking about control systems that operate in the infrastructure. It’s forcing Schneider to partner with different companies we’re not used to. We are being forced to partner with folks that own the digital world. For us, every day, it’s how do we connect the physical world with the digital world? How do we connect Schneider Electric with IBM?” he concluded.

 

For the company worth $30 billion (US) and its 15-person global alliance team, it’s a major puzzle. “Alliance is not core to the strategy of Schneider,” he admits, but digital disruption has forced the company to add an alliance manager to the corporate executive committee.

 

Schneider’s challenge points out a critical alliance question: How do we lead with a velocity of change that is happening at such a rate that is not business as usual? asks  Lorin Coles, CSAP and CEO of the consulting and training company Alliancesphere. “Not doing anything is not acceptable. Companies like IBM are reorganizing from top to bottom. Other companies are trying to change customer buying behavior. If we can solve this customer problem, then the ecosystems and partners support that.”

 

Don’t be afraid. Embrace the change,” chimed in Laura Voglino, general manager of IBM’s ecosystems and social business, who has experienced major disruption and transition at IBM. “It will take you to great things on a personal level because it keeps you vital and great for your companies and in the market.”

 

IBM changed the whole cloud structure with a huge focus and substantial team, she explains. “What really caught us by surprise was the velocity of the transformation and adoption.”

 

More than 90 percent of budgets in data centers are being put into cloud, she adds. The buying behavior of clients is changing, and there is a much greater focus on developers. “We needed to change our view of partnership to catch those cloud developers. We needed to open the scope to have venture capitalists. We needed to work with startups. These guys are bringing a lot of innovation that our clients are very thirsty for. Every time we think of alliances we think of Apple and IBM. But there’s a different level, a different dynamic. We just announced Citibank and IBM partnering, going to the market to activate developers to serve Citibank. This is a different system.”

 

We needed to get people enthusiastic about the start-up guys, ask what the vision is, and ask how to break the inertia of the immediate results. “Inertia is the worst enemy. When you have disruption, the worse you do during disruption time, the better it is to change,” she concludes.

 

With the Internet of Things, if you don’t get revenue, look at the activity or pipeline. And if you don’t have that, then look at lighthouse accounts—those accounts that will bring you revenue in 2016-2018.  “It’s incumbent upon us to stand up and show true leadership. As alliance managers, to be leaders you need to say 100 times to the same people, you will see revenue!” says DeSpirito.  “We don’t need to be the fastest bear. The winner of the Internet of Things is a group of kids in China that developed a remote control way to control forest fires. All of the innovation we are talking about is API [Application Programming Interface].”

Tags:  alliance managers  Alliancesphere  API  Apple  Citibank  cloud  disruption  IBM  Internet of things  Laura Voglino  Lorin Coles  Schneider Electric  start-ups  Tony DeSpirito 

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New England Chapter Event Discusses Alliance Management amidst Disruption: ‘You’ve Got to Be Strategic, You’ve Got to Be Entrepreneurial, You’ve Got to Be Adaptable’

Posted By John W. DeWitt, Wednesday, November 12, 2014

Moderator Jan Twombly, president of The Rhythm of Business, introduced the panelists last Wednesday night, Nov. 5, as ASAP’s New England Chapter convened at the Verizon Innovation Center in Waltham, Mass. USA: Petra Sansom, head of alliance management, Genzyme; Alyssa Rosinski, global business development director, IAPP (International Association of Privacy Professionals); Kathy Faigen, Certified Client Executive, IBM; and Tony DeSpirito, VP, Global Alliances—IT Partners, Schneider Electric.

 

Twombly’s vivid opening slide—two planets in collision—acknowledged the challenging context of the evening’s topic, “Alliance Management in an Age of Disruption: Today’s Critical Partnering Success Factors.” Twombly then flashed four percentages on the screen: 92% … 68% … 42% … and 53%.

 

“Recent studies say 92% of chief marketing officers are looking to partner to get closer to customers and better understand them,” Twombly explained. “68% of chief information officers are partnering to bring additional capability to their organization,” she continued, noting that IBM studies are the source for these two data points. “42% represents CEOs in last year’s PwC survey who said they were going to enter into a significant strategic alliance within the next year.”

 

Finally, 53% represents that very familiar data point for anyone involved in alliance management—the virtually unchanged success rate for strategic alliances despite the proliferation of alliances and alliance management practice across most industries. “It is so clear that alliance management has to step up its game as partnering proliferates,” Twombly said. With her final slide, she asked her panel of expert practitioners, “So what’s changing for alliance managers—do the fundamentals still apply or do they need to change as our businesses change?”

 

Panelists then dived into the discussion—bringing diverse perspectives to an exploration of why alliance management matters more than ever today, yet must adapt if partner success rates are to improve.  Tony DeSpirito discussed how Schneider Electric—confronted with major disruption around the internet of things—moved beyond its stodgy infrastructure company heritage, recognized that it lacked many capabilities, and embraced partnering across both its traditional and emerging business lines. IBM’s Kathy Faigen discussed how her company developed a coherent approach to the disruptive technologies of SMAC (social, mobile, analytics, and cloud) while honing in on the crucial role of engagement, with customers and other constituents, in allowing businesses to successfully embrace unrelenting waves of change. Petra Sansom shared with the audience how Genzyme, a powerhouse biotechnology company now owned by Sanofi, is evolving its partnering strategy as it, and the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industry overall, grapple with pricing pressure from all around the world.

 

Alyssa Rosinski rounded out the discussion with her organization’s interesting lens on disruption. Privacy challenges are exploding thanks to ubiquitous connection, mobile device proliferation, whistleblower disclosures (think Edward Snowden) and correspondingly magnified risks of exposure that companies of all types now face when handling personally identifiable information, she explained. In the face of this challenge, over just the past few years, IAPP membership has grown from 8,000 to more than 20,000.

 

When partnering amidst disruption, DeSpirito said, it’s vitally important to ensure that your partnering is tied to overall strategy—and to do that requires a strategic review of the portfolio, making sure you’ve got the right partners aligned to your company strategy . Faigen talked about the critical importance of ensuring you’ve got the right value proposition for your customer as well as for the partners. It’s never been more important to rethink, to relook at it, and make sure the value proposition remains relevant, she explained.  

 

Wednesday night’s panelists also talked about importance of governance and metrics.

 

“That can be harder to do amidst disruption, because people are so crazily busy, so it’s hard to make the time to plan, to evaluate, it can be hard to think beyond the current crisis or meeting the current quarter’s numbers,” Twombly noted. “I think some of it is a maturing of the alliance capability, where people are recognizing the importance of having good governance. In biopharma, governance is in the contract but that’s not always the case in other industries.”

 

The final question of the night went to Alyssa Rosinski. Asked what quality or skill she is finding essential, she said that adaptability is at the top of her list.

 

Adaptability is, not surprisingly, crucial for alliance managers, who must “understand your partners’ needs, understand what your organization needs, understand what the customer needs, and be flexible and adaptable about how you’re going to get your result,” Twombly said in summarizing the discussion.

 

“In other words, you’ve got to be strategic, you’ve got to be entrepreneurial, you’ve got to be the expert,” she said. “You’re the one who needs to know everything about your partner, to represent the partner within your company, and everything about your company, to represent it to the partner. You’re the only one who has that big picture view, and that’s part of the expectations of senior management today.”

Tags:  alliance management  Alyssa Rosinski  ASAP’s New England Chapter  biopharma  disruption  Genzyme  governance  IAPP  IBM  Jan Twombly  Kathy Faigen  Petra Sansom  Schneider Electric  SMAC  The Rhythm of Business  Tony DeSpirito  Verizon Innovation Center 

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