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What’s Brewing in the 2016 Biopharma Conference Beaker? | Part 2

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Wednesday, July 20, 2016
Updated: Tuesday, July 19, 2016

In a recent interview, ASAP CEO Mike Leonetti, CSAP, provided a sampling of what’s to come at the 2016 ASAP BioPharma Conference. He offered insights into the changing landscape for partnerships and how alliance managers and others need to adapt, as well as a preview of speakers and cutting edge sessions and workshops. 

What about ASAP? What’s brewing in the beaker and will be shared at the conference?

We will be unveiling, and introducing the author of, ASAP’s new study “The Economics of Alliances, Social Capital, and Alliance Performance,” which is scheduled for release after the conference as ASAP’s 6th State of Alliances study. You can read a preview of the study and view some of the research data in the upcoming Summer Strategic Alliance Magazine. Dr. Shawn Wilson, the author, has worked with ASAP to provide financial and economic return on investment (ROI) analytics that are a direct outcome of alliance/partnership management excellence.

What are some of the cutting edge, not-to-be-missed sessions you recommend?

While every session is going to be fantastic, the session that discusses digital or tech partnering capabilities, “New Partnerships between High Tech and BioPharma and the Alliance Management Practices to Support Them,” led by Russ Buchanan, CSAP, head of corporate alliances, Xerox Corporation, and “New Partnerships Between High Tech and BioPharma and the Alliance Management Practices to Support Them,” facilitated by Donna Peek, CSAP, director, partner enablement & operations at SAS Institute, will be timely. The unveiling of ASAP’s research and “Applying the Latest Alliance Management Research to Your Partnering Practice,” by Shawn Wilson, in conjunction with Stuart Kliman, CA-AM, who is presenting Vantage Partners’ research findings, should not be missed.  I think the sessions on “Strategic Perspectives on a Partnership's First 100 Days” offer a new twist on partnering with new players. Another session on partnering in China addresses the crucial need to understand and learn about that country, “A New Model for Western and Chinese Pharmaceutical Partnering,” by Brent Harvey, CA-AM, director, alliance management at Eli Lilly and Company.

Every year ASAP provides workshops for the alliance management toolbox. What’s new in the box this year?

There are several fantastic “Tools and Techniques” pre-conference workshops, the CA-AM and CSAP prep workshops, the Eli Lilly and Company “Alliance Management, Tools and Techniques, “ which never fails to draw rave reviews, as well as one from Candido Arreche, CA-AM, global director of portfolio & partner management, six sigma black belt at Xerox Worldwide Alliances, on “How to Resolve Conflict in Your Alliance.” New to ASAP is the workshop “Next Generation Alliance Management, Lean and Agile,” facilitated by Lynda McDermott, CA-AM, president of Equipro International, and Annick De Swaef, CSAP, president of Consensa, which will preview ASAP’s new corporate alliance management and certification program designed to offer a customized workshop for a company wishing to quickly add to its partnership capability and value creation.

To view the program and download brochure information, go to www. asapweb.org/biopharma.

Tags:  Alliance Management  Annick DeSwaef  Brent Harvey  Candido Arreche  certification  Consensa  digital  Donna Peek  Dr. Shawn Wilson  Eli Lilly and Company  Equipro International  Lynda McDermott  partnership  Russ Buchanan  SAS  Stuart Kliman  Vantage Partners  Xerox Worldwide Alliances 

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Building Win-Win Partnerships By Challenging and Reordering Your Assumptions

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Monday, May 23, 2016
Updated: Saturday, May 21, 2016

Many organizations struggle with partnership execution because of their flawed assumptions, says Stuart Kliman, CA-AM, partner, alliance practice head at Vantage Partners. They need to replace those limited assumptions with more progressive ones, he emphasized in his session “Winning Through Partnering” at the March 1-4 2016 Global Alliance Summit“Partnering Everywhere: Expert Leadership for the Ecosystem,” held at the Gaylord National Resort & Convention Center, National Harbor, Maryland. 

“If you think about how organizations are built, where they come from, organizations—even big old ones—start with the founders’ strategic assumptions of how you win. Those assumptions permeate the building of the organization. The strategic assumption of how you win drives your focus, leadership, structure, incentives, tools, skills, and how you ask people to think.  All of this leads to results,” added the Harvard University faculty member, who has led international conflict resolution through CMG (now part of Mercy Corps), and whose session is a spin-off from the Harvard Negotiation Project. Kliman helps clients maximize the value from partnerships through effective conflict management, negotiation, and relationship management

“You can’t bolt an alliance onto an organization that is not built for partnering—trying to execute partnerships in a world that has not been built for partnership execution,” he said. “We see more and more organizations coming to us to solve that problem.” 

He then highlighted the difference between organizations designed to succeed at external partnering and those that are not. “How do you know that an organization has been built with partnering at its core? And how do you create an organization that is built for partnering versus individual alliances?” he asked. Partnering success depends on these critical components, he pointed out: 

  • Organization is not self-centric
  • Mission statement is partner-oriented
  • Executives and senior leadership looks to alliance management in their options
  • Company has a reputation as a partner of choice
  • Website shows partnering and partnering solutions
  • Leadership does not cascade down
  • Completely flexible
  • Right mix of skills and employees doing the partnering
  • Core competencies training

Organizations should analyze the difference between a progressive partnering stance and one with poor assumptions, he told the audience. “You start with an assumption, and you build on that, and then you break it down into component parts,” he instructed. “You can then map how that strategic assumption drives culture, leadership, focus, organizational structure, incentives, processes and tools, mindset, and skills,” he said, while showing a complex deck slide. 

These lead to good or flawed behaviors, such as the attitude “make them come to us” or the de-prioritization of partner meetings, which all lead to bad results, he added.

“You are saying on the one hand that your goal is to be a world-class partnering organization, but your language says something else.” 

While showing a deck slide on a vicious cycle that threatens partnering success, he provided an example of a CEO who was calling the company partners “gap fillers.” The beginning and ending of the cycle was “We will win through out own expertise.” 

When designing the internal organization, ask these questions: “How is this going to work in alliances? How do we structure this to be externally facing or centric?” he advised. “Without collaboration and negotiation skills, we are likely to fail. By comparison, when we start building with creativity and clear communication, and we launch partnerships with a focus on effective execution, we get this,” he said, flashing a slide with a reversal of the problematic cycle to a virtuous one that ends with “Our company is successful given the value and competitive edge that we get from partnering—partners bring their best opportunities to us.” 

“If you think of the mission of the typical alliance organization, there is a mission statement that says ‘Put alliance managers on alliances to ensure individual alliance support.’ The second aspect of the mission is to ensure that the company is the best possible partnering organization it can be and ensure that it’s a partner of choice. Far too often, we in alliance management have not focused in on the second aspect of the mission,” he concluded. “We see this more and more—a key role for alliance management is embedding the partnering capability deep into the organization—because it’s in your mission statement.” 

Tags:  alliance  conflict management  culture  incentives  leadership  negotiation  organizational structure  partnering  partnership execution  relationship management  Stu Kliman  Vantage Partners 

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When a Good Alliance Hits Bad Times, an Effective Joint Working Session Can Resolve Serious Challenges

Posted By John W. DeWitt, Thursday, October 9, 2014

Any alliance can flounder despite the best intentions of each party involved, according to Stuart Kliman, CA-AM, partner at Vantage Partners. What matters is how the parties work together to uncover the causes and resolve the challenges. A joint working session—bringing together key stakeholders from both alliance members—can be a highly effective means of tacking challenges head-on and strengthening alliance relationships in the process.

 

Kliman discussed how to manage an effective joint working session during the Wednesday, Sept. 24 ASAP Netcast Webinar sponsored by Vantage, “We Have an Alliance Issue: How to Structure and Facilitate Joint Working Sessions Where Issues are Complex and Feelings are Raw,” available now for ASAP Members in the Member Resource Library . The alliance manager plays a crucial role, not surprisingly, because he or she must “construct and facilitate an effective working session that deals well with the challenges in a way that allows the parties to reach good, impactful, and actionable answers,” Kliman explained. The working session must meet the key interests of the parties involved, by developing “creative, value maximizing solutions.” Participants must feel that they are treated fairly—not just by the outcome, but by the process. Working relationships should be enhanced when folks have a greater understanding and acceptance of the realities of each other’s experiences and data. And there should be clarity of commitments with key next steps in place. 

Kliman’s presentation walked attendees of the webinar through a four-step process: 

  1. Define the problem. What are the observable symptoms? What does the desired future state look like?
  2. Generate possible diagnoses. What are possible underlying causes of the gap between the current state and the preferred future state? What obstacles might be preventing success?
  3. Brainstorm general approaches. What are some possible approaches to dealing with the most likely underlying causes? Which set of approaches will we pursue?
  4. Develop specific action ideas. What are the action items for the selected approaches? What are the ways to implement them? Who does what, when?

Kliman then spent the remainder of his formal presentation discussing a case example of a large biopharmaceutical company that hit a roadblock in its partnership with a small biotech company. The relationship was struggling with over-budget development costs and lagging enrollment—and a lot of finger-pointing and frustration on both sides. The four-step process uncovered specific concerns—such as the both the biotech and large pharma company feeling surprised and alarmed by each other’s decisions, and with alliance teams being concerned about upper management making decisions outside of the alliance governance structure.

The process ultimately guided the partners to redefine and augment their communications pathways and protocols while institutionalizing relationship checkpoint and a cadence of informal and formal assessments and health checks for the partnership. An archive of all ASAP Netcast Webinars is available to members as a benefit of membership in the ASAP Member Resource Library. An overview of all previous webinars can be found on ASAP’s public facing website.

Tags:  alliance manager  effective joint working session  Stuart Kliman  Vantage Partners 

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A Classic Story Presented with a New Spin at the 2014 ASAP BioPharma Conference:the Journey to Global Alliance Management Begins with a Single Center

Posted By Rebekah L Fraser, Thursday, September 4, 2014

"More audits. More audits. More audits!" Stu Kliman pumps his fist in the air. The audience laughs.

 

We're nearing the end of a highly engaging panel discussion led by Kliman, entitled, "The Journey to Global Alliance Management."  Kliman has spent the last 40 minutes expertly guiding Mary Jo Struttman and Andy Hull through the process of sharing their stories with a fairly large audience in the Hyatt Regency's grand ballroom at the 2014 ASAP BioPharma Conference in Boston.  

 

This type of session is my favorite. There are no slides, no speeches; just stories, told casually by experts in the field of alliance management.  The relaxed atmosphere seems to suit the rest of the audience, as well. Folks appear to be listening intently.

 

Every major corporation is doing business globally these days, so Kliman makes sure to define the parameters of the conversation at the start of the session. "What does it mean to build a global alliance network," he asks.  "What are the goals? What's the distinction between an alliance management function and an alliance management capability?"

 

The alliance management function can own the alliance management capability; the function can drive the capability.  Yet the presence of the AM function does not automatically guarantee the presence of the capability.  Among the thousands of partnering interactions that must occur regularly, how many actually involve alliance managers?  How can an organization use the alliance management function to drive, push, and enable the AM capability?

 

Developing a global alliance management network is the answer.  Astellas and Takeda chose to create a global AM network in the form of a Center of Excellence (CoE).  Since establishing their CoE for alliance management, Takeda has seen many positive results. Astellas is just beginning the process. Establishing a global alliance management Center of Excellence enables the company to define best practices and consistent behavior patterns within the AM function. Struttman envisions connecting Astellas' top alliance managers around the world, so those who know how to collaborate and have expertise in the field can guide those who are just learning. 

 

Essentially, setting clear boundaries and parameters gives individual alliance teams the freedom to customize each alliance based on the goals defined by all of the key stakeholders, without constant oversight and micromanagement from executives.  

 

"It's not playing nice in the sand box," Struttman explains. "It's the skills... You have a repository of tools, guidelines, and fundamental basics. However you still have knowledge and expertise. " 

 

Both Struttman and Hull share their experiences openly. Hull describes conducting a needs assessment with the alliance management team at Takeda's research sites around the globe. "What was amazing was the list of challenges, and the list of what people needed and wanted was almost identical," he explains.  

 

Across the globe, Takeda's alliance managers requested clear guiding principles and philosophy, clarification and definition of the AM role, tools, skills, and training. They wanted to know what to capture in meeting minutes, what approach to take in internal communications about a given partnership, etc.  At the same time, they feared the center of excellence would create a rigid SOP.  Hull reports that is the opposite of what Takeda leadership wanted to create.  In fact, Takeda chose to keep standard AM reporting requirements separate from the CoE.  Instead, Takeda's global AM team reports to and receives support from an executive steering committee that includes the leaders of emerging markets, research, and business development.

 

"Even though there's no reporting relationship, we're all connected with this virtual center. We get together live, and via phone.  The people who didn't have alliance management skills initially really wanted it, and they ended up being the experts at their sites," Hull explains.

 

The takeaway is this: when people are empowered to design a CoE with procedures, tools, educational opportunities, and strategies based on their needs, they develop a sense of ownership and become the CoE's greatest advocates.  Their work lives are easier and more fruitful, which works to the ultimate advantage of the corporation. 

 

There's a saying in the creative world: there are no original stories.  So, you've probably heard a similar story before. Yet as you apply this version to your unique alliances, you may find the truth in an old chestnut even more valuable than you expected.

 

As Kliman moves toward wrapping the session, Struttman shares a final piece of information: once it was established that Astellas's AM team is integral to the success of the company, the organization hired Price Waterhouse, to audit the AM team to see how they function. "We have a whole set of guidelines, tools, etc., that Price Waterhouse went through with a fine tooth comb," she says. "We came out with a great rating."

 

"Vantage has seen many client opportunities precipitated by audits," Kliman adds.  "It leads to important questions: Do we have policies and procedures in place?"

 

"So you want more audits..." Hull asks, facetiously, to which Kliman responds:

  

"More audits. More audits. More audits!"  

Tags:  2014 ASAP BioPharma Conference  Andy Hull  Astellas  Center of Excellence  Mary Jo Struttman  Stu Kliman  Takeda  Vantage Partners 

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