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Join Our Shared Alliance Aces Community Today!

Posted By Kimberly Miller, Wednesday, October 16, 2019

ASAP Members are now able to join our shared online community for alliance and ecosystem professionals -- the Alliance Aces Community!  ASAP members now have access to additional best practices, ecosystem-related discussions, job posts, upcoming events, fresh new videos, ASAP Certification badges, and some fun community challenges.

As part of our expanded alliance with WorkSpan, ASAP is immediately extending the full benefits of the Alliances Aces Community to all ASAP members.

Alliance Aces Community is an independent community of alliance, partner, and ecosystem practitioners sponsored by the good folks at WorkSpan the #1 Digital Platform for Ecosystems.

We started the AAC community at the end of last year and have now over 500 members.

By joining the Alliance Aces Community, ASAP members now have access to additional best practices, alliance job posts, noteworthy events, participation in alliance challenges and ecosystem-related discussions, and interesting videos like WorkSpan Marketing VP @Chip Rodgers welcoming ASAP Members:

WorkSpan and ASAP Announce a Partnership to Strengthen Their Collaboration - Alliance Aces Community this video embed looks like this on AAC:

Once you join the community, you can also immediately share your own content and events related to any of the above topics, or add your voice and perspective directly within the discussions.

Activate your Alliances Aces Community membership today to get started. We will share these benefits and more news related to our exciting expanded ASAP/WorkSpan via an upcoming joint webinar, taking place in November.

Tags:  alliance  Alliance Aces  ecosystem practitioners  partner  WorkSpan 

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ASAP and WorkSpan Announce a Partnership to Strengthen Their Collaboration and Grow the Ecosystem Community

Posted By Kimberly Miller, Monday, September 30, 2019
Updated: Monday, September 30, 2019

WorkSpan and the Association of Strategic Alliance Professionals (ASAP), two organizations that are deeply engaged with alliance and ecosystem professionals, are proud to announce a new partnership designed to grow and enhance both organizations’ abilities to deliver world-class services to these communities.

WorkSpan is the category leader for Ecosystem Cloud where alliance, channel, and ecosystem leaders connect, co-create, co-market, co-sell, measure, and scale with their ecosystem partners in a single, secure network to grow business together.  ASAP is the only nonprofit, professional association and community which certifies and is dedicated to elevating and promoting the profession of alliance, partnerships, and ecosystems management. 

Over recent years, ASAP and WorkSpan have collaborated on a number of engagements, joint marketing activities, event sponsorships, and joint communications.  

In order to strengthen and deepen that collaboration, today the organizations announce a new partnership, working together on a number of dimensions with the intention of delivering greater service to our shared communities of alliance and ecosystem professionals.

The partnership covers a number of strategic programs in five primary dimensions including:

  • Global and local chapter events
  • Training and certifications(strategic-alliances.org)
  • Online community (AllianceAces.com)
  • Content around alliances and ecosystems
  • Alliance and ecosystems best practices

Through this partnership, WorkSpan and ASAP see the opportunity to strengthen each organizations’ mission and provide greater opportunities for ASAP to deliver high-quality resources to alliance professionals and grow to support additional programs in the future.

 

“ASAP and WorkSpan are ideal partners that support ASAP’s goals to develop, educate, and grow its community of practitioners, in addition to helping them identify the best processes andpractices to manage their partnerships and ecosystems successfully,” said Mike Leonetti, president and CEO of the Association of Strategic Alliance Professionals.

 

“We’ve always had the highest regard for ASAP as a professional association and have enjoyed collaborating with Mike and the ASAP Board over the years.  We look forward to a strong partnership that will deliver immediate benefits to the alliance and ecosystem professionals’ community.”  said Amit Sinha, co-founder and chief customer officer, WorkSpan.

 

The partnership is managed by WorkSpan’s Vice President of Marketing, Chip Rodgers and Mike Leonetti of ASAP. As part of the agreement, Mike Leonetti will join the Alliance Aces community board and Greg Fox, WorkSpan general manager for the communications & networking industry, will join the ASAP advisory board.

 

About ASAP

The Association of Strategic Alliance Professionals (ASAP) is the only professional association dedicated to elevating and promoting the profession of alliance, partnerships, and ecosystems management. Founded in 1998, the organization provides professional development, networking, and resources for cultivating the skills and toolsets needed to manage successful business partnerships. ASAP’s professional certifications include the Certificate of Achievement-Alliance Management (CA-AM) and Certified Strategic Alliance Professional (CSAP).  Find out more about key ASAP events, webinars, and other content at http://www.strategic-alliances.org.

 

Link to the announcement by WorkSpan 

About WorkSpan

WorkSpan is the Category Leader for Ecosystem Cloud.  With Ecosystem Cloud, our customers are capturing a disproportionate share of the Ecosystem Economy — and you can too.  Join the WorkSpan network where alliance, channel, and ecosystem leaders connect, co-create, co-market, co-sell, measure, and scale with their ecosystem partners in a single, secure network to grow business together.

 

WorkSpan is a privately held company backed by Mayfield and is growing its network of global enterprise customers including SAP, Cisco, Microsoft, Accenture, Google, SAS, VMware, NetApp, Nutanix, NTT Data, Lenovo, and others.

Tags:  alliance  Amit Sinha  collaboration  ecosystem  partnership  strategic programs  WorkSpan 

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The Modeling and Management of Alliances: Workshop Takes Deep Dive into Three Models for Collaborative Business

Posted By Noel B. Richards, Tuesday, March 12, 2019

A preconference workshop delving into three different alliance models caught the attention of over a dozen pre-conference attendees at the 2019 ASAP Global Alliance Summit in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Co-facilitators Ard-Pieter de Man, CSAP, PhD, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, and Dave Luvison, CSAP, PhD, Loyola University Maryland, instructed on the horizontal “sharing” model, the diagonal “specialization” model, and the vertical “allocation” model in the session “Building Your Collaborative Business Model.”

The two discussed how the sharing model is an alliance focused on sharing customers and information in order to generate more revenue for each partner, typically with a 50-50 split of this revenue. The specialization model is more about leveraging certain strengths or unique skills of each partner so that each can gain something they did not have before, resulting in the ability to increase revenue with new or improved products. Lastly, the allocation model works to reduce risk by delegating tasks that are a weakness for one company to a partner that expresses excellence in that specific area.

Once the co-facilitators established a baseline understanding of these alliance models, best management practices for each model and the hybridizations between them became apparent. “The bigger question is how you should manage these models, as not every model should be managed the same way,” Luvison pointed out.

The workshop co-facilitators also instructed on how to determine which specific framework is right for your alliance, based on the goals and purpose. The specific models are incredibly fluidconstantly moving, changing, and molding to specific needs, they said. Luvison and De Man then brought up the three things that need management across the boardincentives, relationships, and accountability. Additionally, they shared the idea that 70 percent to 80 percent of the problem in alliances is convincing people internal to the company rather than the partner.

After examining various methods of managing each type of alliance model, they encouraged the audience to split into groups and discuss best management practices. Though these practices may differ across alliance types, all group participants agreed upon the importance of consistent, fluid, and open communication among partner.

Also central to the discussion: as models adjust and change over the lifespan of the alliance, it is critically important that the alliance ensure that the partners are aligned and “on the same page.” Recognizing the scope and scale of each partnership and communicating about the alliance with the appropriate groups of people, notably the C-suite, is also fundamental to success. If one partner sees the alliance following a sharing model while the other recognizes it more as an allocation model, problems will arise. Ensuring and maintaining a mutual understanding of what model the alliance takes is vitally important.

“You’re half the battle. Getting your own organization on board with the alliance is quite important, so do this first, then get the partner on board,” said Luvison.

Once there is a clear mutual understanding of the model the alliance is founded upon, partners must turn inward and ensure consistency understanding within the company. This helps empower teams to deal with issues as they arise, they concluded. Though there are additional complexities in managing each model an alliance assumes, if self-awareness and open communication is pursued, the alliance and the companies involved will benefit across the board.

Noel B. Richards is a staff writer for ASAP Media. Stay tuned for more of the ASAP Media team’s comprehensive on-site coverage of 2019 ASAP Global Alliance Summit sessions on this blog, and in the weekly, monthly, and quarterly Strategic Alliance publications. 

Tags:  alliance  alliance model  allocation model  Ard-Pieter de Man  Dave Luvison  Loyola University Maryland  partner  sharing model  specialization  Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam 

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Building ‘Leadership Muscle’: Get Your Organization Ready for the ‘Partnering Marathon’

Posted By John M. DeWitt and John W. DeWitt, Thursday, March 7, 2019
Updated: Wednesday, March 6, 2019

Welcome to the new partnering race—where everyone is running as fast as they can, frantically trying to catch up to the customer.

Nina Harding, channel chief at Google Cloud, asked an important question at the October 2018 ASAP Tech Partner Forum in San Jose, California: “So how do you work with your partners when the customers are ahead of the ecosystems?” This is indeed an important question, given that “every single thing we do is new,” according to Pear Therapeutics Founder and CEO Corey McCann. He added, in a keynote at the September 2018 ASAP BioPharma Conference, that risks associated with new ventures “conspire to make partnerships not successful.” Stuart Kliman, CA-AM, partner at Vantage Partners, characterized the current playing field as “one of significant and ongoing change, which is driving new forms of collaboration, new kinds of alliances.”

Being successful on such a competitive playing field requires alliance practitioners to build their “leadership muscle,” the focus of the Q4 2018 Strategic Alliance Quarterly cover story, “Building ‘Leadership Muscle’: Are You and Your Alliance Management Organization Ready to Run the ‘Partnering Marathon’?” Building leadership muscle means giving your leaders the strength, flexibility, and endurance to withstand the breakneck pace of modern collaboration.

Why do you need this muscle? No matter your industry, regardless of the specific drivers, it’s almost certain that:

  1. Your company is “remixing” its build-buy-partner strategies;
  2. Partnering activity, especially nontraditional partnering, is exploding for your company;
  3. Your alliance organization faces an overwhelming workload;
  4. Your partnering strategy and execution require new thinking, skillsets, and tools.

If your company and its partners are evolving to catch the customer, then you should (or already will) be rethinking, reorganizing, and relearning:

  • Rethinking. Alliance leaders must continuously rethink partnering strategy and models in the context of disruption and new competitive threats, which are all-but-continuous now.
  • Reorganizing. If you aren’t thinking proactively about how you are organized and aligned to overall company strategy, you can be sure someone else is—and soon you will be thinking about it too, only reactively.
  • Relearning. Alliance executives require new skills and cross-industry knowledge for the new partners and ecosystems they interact with. Many alliance processes and practices require radical rethinking and streamlining if they are to remain useful for managing at the accelerating pace and exploding scope of partnering activities today.

“When all these things are changing around you, you can’t keep doing business as usual,” said Brandeis professor, consultant, and author Ben Gomes-Casseres, CSAP, PhD. “This means very often a change in company strategy [and] if the organization’s strategy is changing, then the alliance organization should change with that. That is fundamental.”

See the Q4 2018 issue of Strategic Alliance Quarterly to learn more about how alliance leaders are rethinking, reorganizing, and relearning while they build “leadership muscle.” John M. DeWitt is copy editor and contributing writer and John W. DeWitt is editor and publisher for ASAP Media and Strategic Alliance publications.

Tags:  alliance  Ben Gomes-Casseres  channel  collaborative  Corey McCann  cross-industry  Google Cloud  leadership  Nina Harding  partnerships  Pear Therapeutics  Stuart Kliman  Vantage Partners 

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Leaders ‘in a Time of Rapid Growth and Change’: Finalists for Announced for 2019 ASAP Alliance Excellence Awards

Posted By Noel B. Richards, Friday, February 15, 2019

Finalists Include Alcon Laboratories, Science Applications International Corporation, Keryx Biopharmaceuticals (subsidiary of Akebia Therapeutics), Thermo Fisher Scientific, Merck & Co., Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Cambridge Assessment English, Novartis, Incyte, Sanofi Pasteur, and Red Hat 

ASAP will honor companies and organizations, practices, and programs that exemplify exceptional performance in alliance management during the ASAP Alliance Excellence Awards ceremony at the 2019 ASAP Global Alliance Summit, which runs March 11-13 at the Westin Fort Lauderdale Beach Resort in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. This month, ASAP announced the companies that are 2019 Alliance Excellence Awards finalists: Alcon Laboratories, Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), Keryx Biopharmaceuticals (now a subsidiary of Akebia Therapeutics), Thermo Fisher Scientific, Merck & Co., Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Cambridge Assessment English, Novartis, Incyte, Sanofi Pasteur, and Red Hat. See the official press release issued via PRWeb.

“This remarkable group of companies has demonstrated significant leadership in alliance management during a time of rapid growth and change for business—and for the partnering profession,” said Michael Leonetti, president & CEO of ASAP. “Our awards committee reviewed a number of outstanding nominees from diverse industries this year, and we’re pleased to recognize these exceptional partners and programs whose success stories and practices can serve as models for the alliance management community.”

Alcon Laboratories’ alliance program contains a complete set of fully documented best practices supported by information technology tools. With a small alliance group, they manage many partners through consistency applying these practices and tools.

 

Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) has developed an alliance program covers not only the “hard” alliance elements, but also pays attention to the “softer” rules of the game, resulting in substantial contribution to revenues as well as recognition from partners. Partner tiering is consistently worked out across the strategic, financial, and relational elements of business.

 

Keryx Biopharmaceuticals (now a subsidiary of Akebia Therapeutics) and Thermo Fisher Scientific collaborated to resolve supply constraints to ensure that patients were able to access Keryx’s proprietary drug through agility and excellent teamwork at all levels of operation.

 

Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany–Bristol-Myers Squibb’s alliance has operated with financial transparency and consistent best practices since its formation in China in the 1990s, a time when the Chinese market was much less accessible.

 

Novartis–Incyte’s decade-long collaboration covers the co-marketing and co-development of an oncology drug in split geographical areas. The alliance has applied best practices across the alliance lifecycle, and led the way for a foundation for a broader alliance mindset in the respective organizations.


Merck & Co. and Sanofi Pasteur built a joint venture for a new drug utilizing a governance model inspired by small, nimble biotech companies to ensure speed and flexibility. The commercialization phase of the new drug so far is very successful.

 

Red Hat completely revamped an alliance training program for its alliance and channel managers, providing a clear learning path for everyone with several checkpoints and feedback options that support managers in their learning. The alliance program has leveraged e-learning and digitization, supported by well-designed management processes.

Cambridge Assessment English teamed up with Future Learn and Crisis Classroom to deliver an online training program for volunteers who help refugees meet refugee needs by focusing on language support. Volunteers (8,000 thus far have signed up) are able to exchange their experience in addition to accessing formal learning modules.

 

Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany developed its Joint Committee Self-Assessment tool after alliance surveys showed that decision-making in the organization’s alliances were too slow. This easily implemented tool helps committees improve their decision making has become standard in the Merck alliance toolkit.

Read the complete press release on PRWeb at http://www.prweb.com/releases/finalists_for_announced_for_2019_asap_alliance_excellence_awards/prweb16099885.htm. Stay tuned for much more coverage of the 2019 finalists and the stories behind their successes on this blog and in Strategic Alliance Quarterly and Monthly magazines.

Tags:  Akebia  Alcon  alliance  ASAP Alliance Excellence Awards  best practices  Bristol-Myers Squibb  Cambridge Assessment English  governance  Incyte  Keryx Biopharmaceuticals  Merck & Co.  Merck KGaA  Novartis  Red Hat  Sanofi Pasteur  Science Applications International Corporation  Thermo Fisher Scientific  toolkit 

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