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A Swim in ‘The Aquarium:’ Your Chance to Collectively Shift the Thought Currents of Alliance Management

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Wednesday, September 7, 2016

ASAP Summit and Conference participants spend a lot of time sitting, listening, and absorbing the most cutting-edge information in the industry. Now it’s your turn to be a speaker, guide, and thought provoker in a new session format at this year’s ASAP BioPharma Conference Sept. 7-9, “New Faces, Unexpected Places in Partnering: The Foresight to Lead, the Foundation to Succeed,” at the Revere Hotel Boston Common, Boston. The Aquarium session encourages attendees to dive in and wrestle with the hot topics of the day in a creative, ASAP-designed version of the “fishbowl” learning activity. Moderated by Jan Twombly, CSAP, president of The Rhythm of Business, the session will start with a lively exchange on key topics from several experts in the field of alliance management as the audience peers into the tank. There will be three 25-minute rounds during the session, each with a separate topic. Participants will be allowed to “tap in” and move the conversation in new directions. When someone comes onto the stage, one person must exit. 

“We’re not sticking to a script; each of these topic discussion could branch off,” explains Ann Johnson, ASAP’s content manager, who has developed the concept as an innovation ASAP programming.  “That’s the beauty of nontraditional session structure like this: It allows for free-space that often results in exploring topics in real and meaningful ways … through many different lenses. It encourages engagement, peer-to-peer sharing, and participation, which is what our members want. There are no right answers to these topics, and in fact we want to hear diverse viewpoints,” Johnson adds. “This is a way to hear from the voices we often don’t hear from.” 

It’s an opportunity to become a member of the “school” in a fast-paced, collective swim that is geared to leave participants with a more creative and innovative perspective on the potential for change in alliance management. The following preselected topics are designed to jumpstart the conversation:

Topic #1: Lead, Follow, or Get Out of the Way

True or False: The alliance management profession in biopharma has the respect, skills, and ability to lead companies into partnering with different types of partners, across industries, and in new models.

Topic #2: Handle with Care: Managing the C-Suite

How do you ensure executive leadership (C-Suite) is appropriately involved in an alliance, without giving them a seat at the table, especially when the alliance is between a small, innovative company and big pharma?

Topic #3: Breadth or Depth – What Does it Take to Succeed?

Which qualities will be more highly valued in alliance managers as the industry adapts to digitization, outcomes based pricing, and an increasing number and variety of partnerships: broad business and technical skills and experience or deep pharmaceutical industry knowledge and experience?

As the conversation evolves, participants will then get a chance to bump the following thought leaders and senior-level partnering executives off the stage: 

  • Jeremy Ahouse, CSAP, PhD, Executive Director Alliance Management, Celgene
  • Harm-Jan Borgeld, CSAP, PhD, Head Alliance Management, Merck Serono 
  • David Burnham, Senior Vice President Strategic Alliance Management, INC Research
  • Mark Coflin, CSAP, Senior Director Alliance Management Global BD&L, Baxalta US Inc.  
  • Cathy Connelly, CA-AM, Head, Alliance Management, Sanofi Genzyme
  • Andy Hull, CA-AM, Vice President, Global Alliances, Takeda Pharmaceuticals
  • Katherine Kendrick, CA-AM; Director of Alliance Management, Elanco, Eli Lilly and Company
  • Brooke A. Paige, CSAP, Staff Vice President, Strategic Initiatives, HealthCore, Inc.
  • Petra Sansom, Sr. Director, Alliance Management, Vertex Pharmaceuticals
  • Mary Jo Struttmann, CA-AM; Executive Director, Global Alliance Management, Astellas Pharma Inc.
  • Michael Sumpter, Head of Alliance Management, Servier Monde
  • David S. Thompson, CA-AM, Chief Alliance Officer, Eli Lilly and Company
  • Steve Twait, CSAP, VP, Alliance and Integration Management, AstraZeneca

 Photo credit:  MB Photo Credit: W. Chappell

Tags:  alliance management  alliance managers  Ann Johnson  Astellas  AstraZeneca  biopharma  c-suite  David Thompson  Eli Lilly and Company  Jan Twombly  Mary Jo Struttmann  Michael Sumpter  partnerships  Petra Sansom  pharma  Servier Monde  Steve Twait  The Rhythm of Business  Vertex Pharmaceuticals 

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The Importance of Keeping a Steady Hand on the Wheel and Stepping up the Pace When Managing Acquired Alliances

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Wednesday, August 31, 2016
Updated: Saturday, August 27, 2016

“How does the alliance manager’s responsibilities change when a company and its alliances are acquired?” That was the key question participants plumbed in the fast-paced session “Navigating the Speed Bumps and Driving Decisions: A Roadmap for Integrating Acquired Alliances” by Katherine Kendrick, CA-AM, director of alliance management at Elanco, Eli Lilly and Company. The session was part of the programming at the 2016 ASAP Global Alliance Summit, “Partnering Everywhere: Expert Leadership for the Eco­system,” held at the Gaylord National Resort & Convention Center, National Harbor, Maryland in the March. Kendrick also reprised her presentation for her April 14 ASAP Netcast webinar.

 

“Each alliance you acquire travels at different speeds,” Kendrick emphasized early on, adding that speed bumps are inevitable and likely will require quick moves with a firm hand on the wheel. When companies are purchased, the alliance manager needs to very specifically address a range of new partnering challenges, including:

 

·         Questionable alliance health status

·         Contract obligations not met by the acquired company

·         Lagging development or progress

·         Misaligned expectations

·         Disparity of information

·         Competitive challenges

·         Demotivation

·         CRO/CMO assignability of contracts

 

Central to a smooth transition is ordering the process of investigation, inquiry, and engagement with the main stakeholders, said Kendrick, who has considerable alliance management experience and more than 15 years of pharmaceutical experience with an emerging market expertise. After working to ensure the delivery of diabetes pharmaceutical and device development partnerships and commercial relationships, she assumed a leadership role in animal health at Elanco in 2015 as director of alliance management for research and development managing the strategic alliance portfolio of external innovation and mergers and acquisitions.

 

The process involves orchestrating clear communication between partners to build alliances teams, establish governance, and drive value; implementing divestiture and termination decisions that are respectful of the partners and individuals; addressing integration challenges that can cause blips in reporting and cash flow, she explained while swiftly flipping through her deck.

 

One way to coordinate that kind of complexity is to think of yourself as a smartphone app, she advised. Be an efficient technological program capable of:

·         Simplicity of interface with your senior leadership

·         Single point of contact for multiple aspects of relationships

·         Provision of integrated solutions

·         Ability to managing multiple tasks

 

Keep in mind, however, that after studying the new map that comes with your acquired alliance, you may conclude that it’s better to terminate, renegotiate, or sublicense.

 

ASAP organizes monthly webinars that are free for ASAP members, but available to non-members for a fee. Click here more information on ASAP webinars like Kendrick’s, or just register for ASAP’s September webinar that will discuss ‘Executing in the Field: The Key to a Sustainable’.

 

For three days of more insightful presentations on topics of critical interest to partnering professionals in life sciences and healthcare, don’t miss the 2016 ASAP BioPharma Conference.

Tags:  alliance health status  alliance managers  ASAP netcast webinars  Elanco  governance  Katherine Kendrick  partnerships  R&D  renegotiate  senior leadership  stakeholders  sublicense  sustainable  terminate 

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‘If You Are Looking for Answers, You Are in the Wrong Session’: Finding the Value of IoT in the Brave New World of Mega-Multi-Partnering

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Monday, June 27, 2016

Solving the challenge of partnering in the Internet of Things has become a major puzzle for even the most skilled alliance executives. It’s a complex Rubik’s Cube of possibilities with multiple cross-industry, interlinking combinations. 

Take, for example, Joan Meltzer, CSAP, IBM alliance executive for Twitter and former smarter cities go-to-market leader at IBM Analytics, and a 36-year veteran at IBM Corp.; Mary Beth Hall, director of product development for IoT at Verizon, where she has worked for the past 20 years; Tony DeSpirto, CSAP, managing director of strategic accounts at Schneider Electric.  These seasoned alliance leaders manipulated the Rubik’s Cube in a panel discussion moderated by Jan Twombly, CSAP, president of The Rhythm of Business, entitled “Capturing the Value of IoT” at the March 1-4 2016 ASAP Global Alliance Summit“Partnering Everywhere: Expert Leadership for the Ecosystem,” held at the Gaylord National Resort & Convention Center, National Harbor, Maryland. Here are some snippets from their provocative conversation: 

Joan: If you are looking for answers, you are in the wrong session. We are all good at managing our jobs one-on-one. If there is any area that companies can’t do it alone, it’s IoT. It’s very complex. We still need the discipline of alliance management and strategy, and we still need to think value creation and capture to put out the whole value chain—it’s how the partners are going to make money. 

Tony: Schneider Electric is focused on the industrial IoT. We are in the infrastructure of everything. What we are struggling with now is how do we make money in IoT? We see value in data, but it needs to be processed through analytics. How to value the partners you have is part of the equation.  

Mary Beth: Verizon has been a Telecom business for the last 20 years and is now shifting to a technology company. I am managing our ThingSpace platform [designed to simplify the development and launch of IoT applications]. How many people have an Apple watch or app for phone tracking health? That’s one example of how Verizon is making money. Think about a smart sneaker, a sensor in a sneaker that tracks cadence and whether you are hydrated. How do we proliferate that? Is Nike willing to allow us to put partners in their ecosystem that were competitors? Fitbit and MyFitnessPal are allowing potential competitors into that space. We as thought leaders in that space need to adapt to that. How do we do that? There’s not one player at the table any more, there are six or seven, and that is really changing the way we market things. 

Tony: We in this room are unencumbered by that to a certain degree. As alliance managers, we have an ability and obligation to seek out these new business models. Thinking of how we will make money in two or ten years, the ideas are not going to come from executive management. They are going to come from peers in the room. You need to say “yes,” and figure out how it will be done. For most executives, it’s an uncomfortable thing to turn that “yes” into a repeatable model. 

Joan: It’s like sitting at a table with an elevator and escalator company, and working with them together. The elevator manufacturer is about maintenance. With IoT, the elevator can connect with the escalator, and that’s a new revenue stream. The functionality evolves into our revenue stream. 

Mary Beth: We need to put it together for the customer. That is some of the challenge we have seen at Verizon. Partners and customers require treading on new ground for partnership models with the unique needs of customers in mind. For example, there is a winery on the West Coast. They need to be able to fertilize the ground. We are helping provide data for the soil. It’s not a hard thing for us as technologists, but it is for farmers who are not used to be in that data space. And they can in turn sell it to other wineries. 

Tony: How many of your companies have IoT initiatives? Our senior leadership is thinking about how they can make their numbers today, so it’s all the more incumbent upon us to blaze that trail and show them where that value is. The fundamentals of partnering don’t change. It’s still basic blocking and tackling. The people you are talking with might change, and the executive management of a company might need more partnering intelligence. 

Mary Beth: In terms of driving change at Verizon, I am in the product role. When the product was fully ready for customers, we would launch. Now we can’t do that. We’re moving from a command-and-control leadership to a more servant leadership. I’m in the product and new business group, and you’re going to see some cool stuff coming out of Verizon that you haven’t seen before.  

Joan: You need to figure out the whole chain to deliver the solution. We started to see that in the cloud. But there is a gap in the solution where we don’t always have access to the marketplace. 

Mary Beth: Sometimes it’s about looking at a new market in a new way. Putting things together in new ways to get leadership to buy into it. Show them a little bit of what it looks like. 

Jan: The fundamentals of partnering are the same, but how do you keep the same with six to seven partners? How do you make sure everyone is getting the value? 

Tony: The concept doesn’t change. I believe that when you try to get six to seven people to agree, it won’t happen. There will always be someone who will win and lose because of the complexity. When things are tough, I go back to the fundamentals, like let’s get together at least once a quarter. 

Mary Beth: We had to break the barrier between legally what we felt we could do and what the market was asking for. We said “We are going to open everything up, we are breaking down barriers.” We put in governance around the partners in that space, and they are partners that are reselling that service. But the complexity in IoT is still there. We are desperately trying to simplify it. We are not there yet. 

Joan: We are all about repeatability, but you have to have assets that are repeatable. With smart cities, we are able to package things up and periscope it. I expect the same thing to happen with IoT. But you may not be able to resell that solution. I hope next year we will be able to talk about repeatability because none of us can afford to be in an on-and-off business. 

Tony: We need to get our leaders out of the comfort zone. That’s what we get paid for. 

Joan: You need a really solid project manager who will require everyone to come together. Ask what’s hot? Healthcare, the automotive industry, airplanes—anything with asset management is very hot. 

Tony: With the industrial portion of manufacturing, the technology on the factory floor is 30 to 40 years old. That’s slowly opening up. There is money to be made in the data that is involved in manufacturing. That is a data rich environment. 

Mary Beth: Simplify the complexities with your partners, be innovative, and finally, don’t be afraid to go after something you think is there. 

Tags:  2016 ASAP Global Alliance Summit  alliance executive  Alliance Managers  data rich  IBM  innovative  IoT  Jan Twombly  Joan Meltzer  Mary Beth Hall  partnering  Partners  Schneider Electric  The Rhythm of Business  Tony DeSpirto  Verizon 

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Why do Channels Matter to Alliance Managers?

Posted By Norma Watenpaugh, CSAP | Phoenix Consulting Group, LLC | CEO & Founding Principal, Wednesday, May 18, 2016

Today, increasingly channels are becoming the preferred route to market for technology alliances with new models of converged architectures, such as cloud computing and big data analytics. As a result, each alliance relationship needs to redefine the sales engagement models that make sense. One partner can be a route-to-market for the other or they can meet in the channel or they can take the traditional influence channel model and collaborate on joint selling.  More often than not, it’s a combination of all of the above.  

What we have seen in the 2013 Go-to-Market Alliances Research is not only are alliances employing multiple routes to market: channels, OEM and co-sale, but the top performing alliances are more heavily invested in an indirect route vs. relying on just joint sales for revenue. This is an ongoing trend with 65% of alliances choosing direct sales in our previous 2010 survey. Given what we are hearing in the industry today, we would expect to see even more business shift to the channel were we to conduct this survey again in 2016.

What this implies is that it is not feasible to keep partners neatly siloed and alliance managers need to be as sophisticated about enabling channel sell-thru success as they are in sell-with.  And in this time of technology convergence and business model transformation, alliance managers need to be solidly grounded in what is happening in the channel and how to equip channel partners to succeed with alliance offers.

 What do alliance managers need to know about channel sales? 

Well it starts with tried and true partner value proposition but viewed through the new lens of “what is the value the channel partner brings to the customer?” What is the value or business proposition that is recognized by the channel partner? What is the value that you, as part of an alliance, recognize? The key principles of success being how do WE create value for customers and how do WE make money all together? That would be the inclusive WE meaning channel partner, your alliance partner, your company and even your customer.

Starting with the customer experience will give alliance managers some perspective on the best route to market, whether direct or with a channel partner. How does your target customer prefer to buy? Do they work with local heroes to recommend and implement your proposed alliance offer or do they rely on global system integrators to act in the trusted advisor role? With the confusing array of converging technologies and digital transformation, going to market through a channel partner that acts as a trusted advisor makes sense. Your channel partner absorbs the complexity and connects technology features to business relevancy for the customer. One channel marketing professional raved about her favorite VAR. They specialized in the Health Spas. They knew everything about the business of operating Spas and could help Spa owners and operators with turnkey technology that would create better experiences for spa customers. And in her words “They were making a killing!”

Another building block of success in understanding how to go to market through channel partners is understanding the driving economic model for the channel. Gone are the days when VARs could make a tidy living on resale margin. Cloud solutions are putting even more pressure on the channel as the cloud margins are even thinner and recognized as monthly recurring revenue. The survivors are developing new skills, new services, and IP, such as API extensions to create complementary revenue streams. In other words, your joint offer may have just become the razor.  Savvy alliance managers will examine the profit model around their joint offer for the channel, being mindful that they need to compete for the best channel partners. 

Understanding the channel partner economic model, gives you insight into how to enable profitability for those partners and you have to do that at scale. You will need many channel partners who are capable of selling, marketing, provisioning, implementing, configuring and supporting your offer. This means working with your channel organizations to build the enablement program that supports not only the joint offer, but also those new revenue streams.

Yes, there are many moving parts and lots to think about, but the trend is clear. As technology buying shifts to the line of business buyer, it takes a partner in the ecosystem that understands the buyer’s business and has that vital relationship required to sell solutions that build their business.  That partner is a channel partner.   

Author and guest blogger Phoenix Consulting Group CEO & founding principal Norma Watenpaugh, CSAP was named 2015 Woman of Influence in Silicon Valley and is a seasoned  volunteer leader for ASAP. She is a member of ASAP and her company is an Education Partner Provider to our members. 

Tags:  alliance managers  channel  channel marketing  Channel partner  cloud solutions  Economic model  Education Partner Provider  go-to-market alliance research  Norma Watenpaugh  Phoenix Consulting Group  sell-thru  VAR 

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New Interactive Summit Session Allows Participants to “Spin the Globe” for Intensive Study of Regional Cultures Around the World

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Friday, April 15, 2016

ASAP introduced a thought-provoking session at the March 2016 Global Alliance Summit that allowed attendees to “spin the globe” and finger regions of interest for cultural exploration. Designed to help alliance managers glimpse the importance of understanding cultural nuances, “Alliances Around the World: Cultural Roundtables” provided insights and tips on doing your homework before stepping into a partnering venture that’s sometimes halfway around the globe. 

Deftly moderated by Philip Sack, CSAP, president of ASAP’s Asia Collaborative Business Community, the two-hour session that took place at “Partnering Everywhere: Expert Leadership for the Ecosystem,” held at the Gaylord National Resort & Convention Center, National Harbor, Maryland, was co-presented by three knowledgeable alliance managers: China was covered by Andrew Yeomans, CSAP, director of alliance management, biopharma business, Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany; India was covered by Subhojit Roye, CSAP of Tradeshift; Latin America was covered by Guarino Gentil Jr., CA-AM of Serono, a healthcare division of Merck.

The next issue of Strategic Alliance Magazine will feature the first of several articles written about the roundtables—a virtual collective deep dive led by Yeomans and his Chinese partner, Jin Wu, who works for Serono (a healthcare division of Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany) in China. The article takes readers into the nuances, taboos, and norms of doing business in China, via a roundtable discussion, with the roundtables for India and Latin America following in a subsequent issue.

“What’s needed for success, in general, has to do with people and relationships,” summarized Sack when introducing the session. After describing the need for partnering with cultural sensitivity in our fast-merging world, he provided a very basic list applicable to anyone doing business in any country:

  • Be an active listener
  • Communicate well—be a good speaker
  • Be patient

Attendees then selected a region, and eventually rotated throughout the room engaging in regional exchanges led by the remaining two co-presenters. The animated discussions included multiple questions and answers from the co-presenters and participants on topics ranging from traditional values, social networks, and product approval processes to contracts, copyright, inflation, and state-by-state legal variances.

The co-presenters emphasized the value of developing appropriate soft skills, such as understanding what is important in a particular culture: holidays, seniority, punctuality—or in some cultures a laid-back approach to time.

In China, for example, knowing how to socially negotiate the system of guanxi (the concept of drawing on connections in personal or business relations) is critical for access to Chinese markets. The guanxi business network is a web that interlinks thousands of social and business connections.

In India, it’s key to understand the lines of delineation and codes of conduct: a partner can become a competitor; a prospective acquisition target can end up assuming your company. In Latin America, effective communication requires easing into relationships with chitchat on personal issues because direct communication can be viewed as impolite.

Becoming attuned to legal, political, and structural differences in a country, region, or district is also advantageous. For example, taxes in Latin America can be very complicated. Several layers of tax fees exist, and Brazil can be especially complicated with different VAT taxes, each with its own rules. The taxes may vary product-to-product and state-to-state, explained Gentil.

In India, where software development has matured considerably, doing business in village areas requires sensitivity and insight into the caste system. “The caste of an individual could play an important part in success. It’s best to have the local country representative guide you,” advised Roye. “This needs to be done with extreme sensitivity as India is a democracy, and equality of opportunity is important.”

In China, it’s especially important to pay careful attention to the contract. One needs to consider the spirit as well as the letter of the contract and differing approaches to interpretation, said Yeomans. A lot of partnering is done with the Chinese government, and your goals for doing business need to be seen as adding value, "a kind of Robin Hood philosophy where the company is distributing for the human good, for humankind,” he added. “They would see that approach as an added value concept.” Negotiating the nuances of China “requires a huge amount of depth and understanding, and the key is to harness [the skills necessary for entering] the Chinese market.” 

Tags:  Alliance managers  Andrew Yeomans  China  cultural nuances  cultural sensitivity  guanxi business network  Guarino Gentil Jr.  India  Latin America  Merck KGaA  Merck Serono SA  negogiating  Philip Sack  Subhojit Roye  Tradeshift 

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