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‘Running on Ice’: Creating a Winning Partnering Team When the Odds Are Against You—Part 2

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Wednesday, March 13, 2019

“Just getting on the track was a challenge,” Donna Peek, CSAP, vice president, global alliances at Genpact, said during a creative session “Cool RunningsThe Road to Building New Alliance Capability” co-led by her colleague Scott Valkenburgh, CSAP, vice president, global alliances leader. She was further explaining their analogy of their process of building a winning bobsledding team, much as was done for the 1988 Olympics by a Jamaican team (see Part 1 of this blog for background on the movie used to frame for their session).  The analogy was particularly near and dear to Peek’s heart because her grandmother is Jamaican, she said, while modeling her yellow jacket worn for the event. Peek continued to describe Genpact’s challenging experience transitioning into a partnering mindset where they created teams capable of “running on ice.”

“Our organizations are filled with sellers with no partnering experience. We didn’t know how to think about partnering. So we created a  quick and easy checklist to answer the existential question: To partner or not to partner?” explained Peek to rippling laughter throughout the room. The list highlights the following key questions:

  1. Should we consider partnering?
  2. Will partnering increase the likelihood of winning?
  3. Can we team with this partner?
  4. What are my options other than partnering?

We eventually “had in place the owner, experienced coaches,  growing team, strategy. Now we needed uniforms, equipment, etc.,” she further explained. “And you can’t win races without money. That means getting sponsors and establishing partner programs. … In doing that, we work with all the key stakeholders,” she continued, and then talked about areas in need of alignment with the strategy:

  • Marketing
  • Legal
  • Services lines: “We created our Blueprint 2.0 to … understand their strategies and align with our strategies.”
  • Risk/compliance: “We created a vendor governance office at Genpact—not the most ‘partner friendly’ processes.”
  • Sales and the CRM system: “The very first order of business when contemplating partnering, where we looked at fields to tag partners [in our CRM system to] capture data about partnering.” 

Prepping the training track is another important component, added Van Valkenburgh. “The  challenge is to achieving the “perfect slide”—a bobsledding term. When bringing a bobsled onto the track, and getting people to push it, you need to ask: “How do we know the track is running well and consistent?”

Peek and Van Valkenburgh experienced “the antithesis of what every alliance professional experiences,” he observed. “Senior leadership was behind it, but then you get to the other 89,000 people. So you get the funding, support, and visibility, and then you realize there is  concrete underneath [the snow], and someone melted the ice. ... It’s really apparent on the track that that is concrete, not ice,” he joked. “We are a company of entrepreneurs, but a company of entrepreneurs with 90,000 people is a lot of train wrecks. Systems and processes really matter. So how do you combine that track with the entrepreneurial spirit?” he asked. “The last part was, we don’t have a track. If I don’t produce the results, building out the track doesn’t matter. How do we build this track and get the culture behind it?”

What was one of the best tools Genpact used to reconfigure the organization? An alliance maturity model, said Van Valkenburg.  “Most of us have these complex models, these spider webs. What we created was [a simple] six things.

“If you can get the maturity level to advance, the growth potential is huge,” he noted. “This can be difficult for one-on-one partnerships, but multi-tenancy partnerships are even harder. … You have to spend as much internal time with [your organization’s leaders] building a true connection. Once they believe you are going to build a bobsled team, you are in. Your team skillset matters. The involvement of the leadership matters,” he concluded. “The celebration is with the team, not just the alliance partners.”

Stay tuned for more of ASAP Media’s comprehensive coverage at the 2019 ASAP Global Alliance Summit.

Tags:  alliance professionals  alliances  Donna Peek  Genpact  Global Alliance Summit  partner  partnering mindset  partners  Scott Van Valkenburgh  team 

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Summit Panel Discusses ‘Herding Your Lawyers’—How to Turn Attorneys into Collaborators Using New Tools and Tricks of the Trade

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Tuesday, March 27, 2018

At the 2018 Global Alliance Summit, attorney Bill Kleinman, a partner at Haynes & Boone, LLP, leads an intriguingly titled panel discussion on “Herding Your Lawyers: Turning Negotiators into Collaborators.” Law schools prepare lawyers as zero-sum negotiatorsnot collaborators, Kleinman asserts. But when alliance professionals can turn their attorneys into collaborators, it benefits their partnerships. Kleinman’s panel includes two seasoned alliance managers to help him demonstrate approaches, techniques, and tools for negotiating collaboration: Nancy Breiman, CSAP, director, global alliances at IBM, and Bernie Hannon, CSAP, strategic alliance director, Citrix.  The panel plans to use interactive tools for negotiating a strategic alliance to prepare for a mock negotiation between a municipal lighting supplier and an artificial intelligence company for smart cities lighting. For the March 2018 edition of eSAM Plus and for this blog post, I had the pleasure of interviewing all three session leaders about their insightful session before the 2018 Summit, whose theme is “Propelling Partnering for the On-Demand World: New Perspectives + Prov­en Practices for Collaborative Business” and will be held March 26-28 in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, USA. The following article continues the conversation that begins in eSAM Plus.   

How can these techniques and tools be applied in multi-party collaborations?

Bill Kleinman: I’ve set up the tools for a two-party alliance, but I have used them in multi-party alliances. I have used them in five- and six-party alliances.

Nancy Breiman: Using these tools, even if it’s only with two parties, has incredible value. But I have tried to work in partnerships where there are multiple parties involved, and no one has figured that out yet. It’s very challenging on multiple fronts. Where I’d like to test the waters on this is with IBM’s blockchain ecosystem strategy. With blockchain technology, you have to have multiple parties in the ecosystem. It’s the nature of the beast.

Kleinman: Multiple parties are exponentially harder. But one of the tools we look at, which we call alliance swim lanes, permits as many partner lanes as we want.

Breiman: But then you will have five sets of KPIs, five sets of IPs, etcetera, to deal with.

Kleinman: It’s definitely a multiplier.

Hannon: The more complexity, the more need for structure. What Bill is proposing here for a two-party agreement is all the more critical when it involves multiple parties. It speaks to the need to come up with something that is structured and allows for the same discovery and results when multiple parties are involved. That is so much harder to achieve without tools. I wouldn’t even attempt to do a multi-party collaboration without tools like this.

What are some of the other collaboration challenges this session will address?

Breiman: There is no way to separate the legal construct and thinking from the alliance construct. A good alliance manager will have both party’s needs top-of-mind. You need to represent your own company while being sensitive to the needs of other partners. The legal team needs to be part of the team up front and part of the collaboration process. I don’t think they are separated.

Hannon: If you can avoid some of the trial-and-error aspect of the maturation process, you are going to be in a better position to produce better partnerships sooner.

Breiman: Bernie and I together have a lot of years of alliance management under our belts. For new people, its hard to bring them into the business because its one of those roles where maturity, seniority, and experience are needed. New alliance managers without a lot of world experience can avoid a lot of the pitfalls using these tools.

How do you apply these techniques and tools in your alliance management positions?

Kleinman: I’ve probably been using these tools over the last 10 years, and they have developed over time. They are based on things that I have come up with and read about in literature.

Hannon: I am just learning about this process in this engagement with Bill and Nancy. I have a very forward-looking view of this. A lot of the negotiations I’ve been involved with until now were done the old-fashioned way. Things have changed enough in these industries that we need to find new outcomes. Partnerships tend to be more enduring when founded on objectives and outcomes that are perhaps more mutually desirable than in the past.

The views represented by Nancy Breiman and Bernie Hannon are their own and do not necessarily reflect their company’s perspectives. For more information on this and other Summit sessions, go to http://asapsummit.org/.

Tags:  alliance  alliance professionals  Bernie Hannon  Bill Kleinman  Citrix  Collaborators  Haynes & Boone  IBM  Lawyers  Nancy Breiman  Negotiators  partnerships  techniques  tools 

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New Offerings at ASAP BioPharma Conference Address Wide-ranging Impacts on the Healthcare and Life Sciences Industries

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Saturday, August 27, 2016

As futuristic technologies become realities, professionals in the life sciences and healthcare industries are consulting their maps and charts to determine how their companies should navigate the new waters. Attendees at ASAP’s next BioPharma Conference will have an opportunity to collectively view the vast possibilities at “New Faces, Unexpected Places in Partnering: The Foresight to Lead, the Foundation to Succeed,” Sept. 7-9 at the Revere Hotel in Boston, Mass., USA. This year’s conference will address wide-ranging impacts on the industry, including the changing political scene, multi-partnering, the Internet of Things, and assistive technologies. 

 

After a rich offering of workshops on Sept. 7, the conference will kick off with a timely address from keynote speaker Dr. Sam Nussbaum, strategic consultant, EGB Advisors, Inc., who will present a talk on “Healing the U.S. Health Care System: Collaboration is Essential” (for more information about Nussbaum, see the link in this E-news), followed by a networking opportunity. The following two days include a plenary and about 26 forward-thinking, thought-provoking sessions from which to choose.

 

"The ASAP Biopharma Conference is a must-attend for alliance professionals of all experience levels,” says Jan Twombly, CSAP, former ASAP chairman of programming, and president of The Rhythm of Business. “It traditionally offers equal parts of looking outward to how the industry is changing and the implications for managing the risk and optimizing the value of alliances and other collaborations, as well as looking inward to develop the mindset, skillset, and toolset of a modern alliance capability.”

 

Well-known and respected industry luminaries are unveiling some never-before-presented information and perspectives. Take, for example, these insightful offerings:

  •  “Applying the Latest Alliance Management Research to Your Partnering Practice,” presented by Stuart Kliman, CA-AM, partner, alliance practice leader at Vantage Partners, and Shawn Wilson, DBA, vice president and general manager at Beaulieu Group: Two new groundbreaking research studies provide critical data on current trends, challenges, and opportunities in the alliance management profession.
  • “A New Model for Western and Chinese Pharmaceutical Partnering,” presented by Brent Harvey, CA-AM, director of Alliances, Eli Lilly and Company: "How To" insights on collaboration drawn from a longstanding, advanced partnership model between Eli Lilly and Company and WuXi AppTech, which provides, among other things, examples of how to leverage the regulatory environment in China to bring new drugs to market faster.
  • “New Partnerships between High Tech and BioPharma and the Alliance Management Practices to Support Them,” presented by Russ Buchanan, CSAP head of corporate alliances at Xerox Corporation, Joseph Schramm, VP strategic alliances at BeyondTrust, and David Thompson, CA-AM chief alliance officer at Eli Lilly and Company: Key insights provided by two highly accomplished technology company alliance executives that are sure to generate discussion about how biopharma alliance professionals can overcome potential challenges when partnering with tech companies.

 Preparing for rapid change is a central theme throughout the conference, and some of the workshops are offering essential “updates” for the alliance management toolbox. “With many more partners for many more purposes, new partnering models and differences to leverage, no alliance manager can rest on his or her laurels,” points out Twombly. “Unique among biopharma alliance management conferences, the ASAP Biopharma Conference leans in on where the profession is going, not where it has been."

 

Several workshops being offered emphasize the need to stay abreast of pressing industry changes, such as “Next Generation Alliance Management, Lean and Agile” facilitated by Lynda McDermott, CA-AM, president of EquiPro International, and Annick De Swaef, CSAP, managing partner of Consensa Consulting. Their workshop addresses digitalization’s influence on biopharma and cross-industry partnering, and it centers around basic questions that everyone in the industry is asking: “Are my team's current alliance best practices future proof? Should my alliance team acquire new skills?” De Swaef recommends combining ASAP’s newly launched in-company team training with the CA-AM Certification Exam Prep to strengthen company capabilities, expand into new areas of value creation, and introduce new best practices.

 

Twombly and Rhythm of Business Principal, Jeff Shuman, CSAP, are offering their own forward-thinking, 90-minute, hands-on workshop on design thinking for complex problems, such as for multi-partnering, non-asset-base alliances, and partnering with “sectors who run on much faster clock speeds than is typically seen in biopharma.” The data-driven, user experience-centered innovation and problem-solving methodology has been adapted for alliances and partnering practices.

 ASAP also plans to unveil a new custom-designed session: The ASAP Aquarium, facilitated by Twombly. Similar to a “fishbowl” communications activity, where the line is intentionally blurred between listeners and participants, ASAP’s version will start off with a deep discussion between industry thought leaders and senior-level partnering executives as the audience gazes into the aquarium. Listeners will then be able to “tap in,” join the discussion with a hot idea or new perspective, and replace the initial participants. The session provides for a fun way to actively engage and contribute to the collective wisdom of the group while exploring the questions that matter most as alliance professionals “engage with new faces and in unexpected places.”

Tags:  Alliance Professionals  Annick De Swaef  ASAP BioPharma Conference  BeyondTrust  Brent Harvey  collaboration  David Thompson  Dr. Sam Nussbaum  Eli Lilly and Company  EquiPro International  Jan Twombly  Jeff Shuman  Joseph Schramm  Lynda McDermott  Russ Buchanan  The Rhythm of Business  WuXi AppTech  Xerox 

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It is Time to Think Differently - Taming the Complexity of IoT Partnering

Posted By Jan Twombly, CSAP and Jeff Shuman, CSAP, PhD | The Rhythm of Business and SMART Partnering, Wednesday, May 4, 2016

The Internet of Things (IoT) is upending partnering “best practices.” One practice is clear: no company succeeds alone. It takes an ecosystem.

This is partnering at a scale, scope, and speed unprecedented until now. It requires creativity and bold experimentation. Companies must learn quickly, iterate strategies, manage complexity, and try new models for value creation, delivery, and capture.

“We know how to partner. We’ve been doing it for 20 years.” These are deadly words when said about partnering for the Internet of Things. The fundamentals of partnering may still apply – or not – but businesses that until now have been relatively un-digitized are discovering tremendous opportunities to rethink their operations and economics. This necessitates partnering:

  • Across industries and sectors
  • With many more companies for any given industry solution
  • At a greater speed to assemble and reassemble the right partners for each customer scenario
  • With agility, shifting from orchestrator to participant, sometimes with the same customer
  • In conjunction with “Everything as a Service” business models

Innovate and Experiment

Companies that succeed at building the partnering ecosystem required for the IoT take a page from design thinking: Start with the experience of the end customer and play that back to solution development. Those that succeed think similarly about the partner experience, making it easy to engage and drive down transaction costs. They do not lock onto any specific business or partnering model; rather they experiment and learn which of the assumptions you’ve made are valid and which are invalid and need to be iterated.

Instead of copying what competitors consider “best practices,” companies that remake their partnering capabilities for today’s connected world look for other inspiration. For example, Médicins sans Frontières (Doctors without Borders) assembles teams of medical and logistical professionals when conflict breaks out or there is an epidemic. The network has the ability to quickly assemble and then disband when the work is done because it knows what each partner considers valuable and works to ensure that value is received, thus maintaining willingness to participate and contribute value.

Companies throughout the ecosystem, regardless of their role or roles, must be willing to take some risks and fund experimentation to determine what is repeatable and scalable, both in the business and partnering models and in how partnering operations are carried out.

Connective Tissue or Achilles’ Heel

At the ASAP Global Summit in March keynote presenter Jonathan Ballon, Vice President of Intel’s Internet of Things (IoT) Group made it very clear that IoT is a massive opportunity to create and realize tremendous economic value; transforming industries; changing products, services, and solutions, and disrupting business models. He also emphasized that partnering and alliances are the connective tissue required to realize this value. The SMART Partnering Alliance of The Rhythm of Business and Alliancesphere argues that success in the ecosystem partnering required by IoT is not happenstance – it takes careful design. If your company’s partnering capability is insufficient for the task, partnering might be your Achilles’ heel – the exposed and unprotected weak spot of your organization. Alliance professionals have a duty to provide their executives with a roadmap across the new partnering landscape.

Over the next few months, we’ll be publishing a series of blog posts and white papers that explore what is different about partnering in the IoT - and how to apply design thinking – what we call Partner By Design to evolving partnering practices for the connected ecosystem era and everything as a service business models.

Missed the Summit Keynote? Read a Summary and Perspective on it from SMART Partnering.

ASAP was given permission by ASAP Corporate Member, EPPP, and guest bloggers Jan Twombly, CSAP and Jeff Shuman, CSAP, PhD of The Rhythm of Business and SMART Partnering to reprint the contributed blog. 

Tags:  alliance professionals  alliances  Alliancesphere  business model  ecosystem  Intel  Internet of Things  Jonathan Ballon  partner  partnering  SMART Partnering Alliance  The Rhythm of Business 

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