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Fascinating Mix of Case Studies Woven Into ASAP Conference Programming This Fall

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Monday, September 17, 2018

Trio of conferences this September, October, November will include plenty of practical sessions with real-life examples of partnering success stories

The next issue of Strategic Alliance Magazine will include a fascinating case study on the Dutch Alliance for Data and Tax on Wages and Benefits, a complex alliance between the Dutch IRS, National Social Security Administration, and Statistics Netherland. The two alliance managers in the article will also provide details on how they formed, managed, and problem-solved the complex collaboration in a session at the upcoming 2018 ASAP European Alliance Summit: “Owning Your Ecosystem & Building the Future,” in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, Nov. 8-9 (location to be announced).  

Case studies are a powerful way to make a point, demonstrate useful tools and techniques, and highlight the best practices used to solve alliance challenges. There’s nothing quite as impressionable as a real-life alliance success story packed with examples of problem solving, effective frameworks, and cutting-edge techniques. In fact, the European Summit will kick off with a “Case Study of a Large-Scale Bi-Lateral Strategic Alliance,” presented by Christophe Pinard, director of global strategic alliance at Schneider Electric and Jean Noel Enckle from emerging solution ecosystem development at Cisco. The two speakers plan to provide their reflections and case perspectives on the dynamic, progressive alliance between the two companies. 

Their talk will set the stage for a summit where as many as 30 case studies will be tucked into sessions spanning a wide range of cross-industry topics, including

The Internet of Things (IoT), telecom, financial services, pharma/life sciences, digital ecosystems, telecom, energy, fintech, consumer goods, and other areas of interest. Presenters will include the heads of alliance divisions, CEOs, and other professionals.

A similar trend is afoot at the upcoming 2018 ASAP BioPharma Conference: “Creating Valuable and Innovative Partnerships by Driving the Alliance Mindset,” at the Hyatt Regency Boston, Boston, Massachusetts, Sept. 24-26.  Case studies are a great tool for teaching, and they will be central to the session “Let’s Make a Deal: Driving Better Contracts to Win in Clinical Genomics,” presented by Katherine Ellison, CA-AM, associate director of alliances at clinical genomics leader Illumina, Inc. Attendees will be asked to consider several of Illumina’s case studies and then delve into key areas where the alliance teams worked collaboratively with business development throughout the deal negotiation process.

Participants are asked to prepare for the session and bring their own case studies to share and discuss with peers on relevant topics, such as:

  • Methods to transform working relationships
  • Shared process models and governance structures to facilitate collaboration
  • Fit-for-purpose tools that drive internal and external information sharing
  • The merits of centralized and decentralized alliance and business development models

If you’re more interested in customer case studies on the tech side, join some of the biggest tech movers and shakers for one day, October 17, at the 2018 ASAP Tech Partner Forum: “Owning Your Ecosystem & Building the Future,” at the Four Points by Sheraton, San Jose Airport, San Jose, California. Keynote speakers Mitch Mayne and Wendi Whitmore of IBM, plans to weave some relevant alliance experience into his talk “Cyber Security Ecosystem Meets the Customer Experience,” and there will be plenty of concrete case study examples from Scott Van Valkenburgh, CSAP, vice president, global alliances leader at Genpact in his talk “Robotic Process Automation (RPA): Partnering Considerations.” Genpact has implements several successful RPA projects with Genpact’s RPA partnering strategy, and Van Valkenburgh plans to share lessons as well as customer case studies as he discusses Genpact’s launch and early RPA strategy.  

Learn more about these and other case studies, review additional sessions and content, and sign up for early bird discounts at the following links:

BioPharma Conference: http://www.asapbiopharma.org/sessions.php

Tech Partner Forum: http://www.asaptechforum.org/index.php

European Alliance Summit: https://www.asapeusummit.org/

Tags:  alliances  ASAP BioPharma Conference  ASAP European Alliance Summit  ASAP Tech Partner Forum  case studies  Christophe Pinard  Cisco  Clinical Genomics  Cyber Security  ecosystem  Genpact  governance  IBM  Illumina  IoT  Jean Noel Enckle  partnering  partnerships  RPA projects  Schnieder Electric  strategy 

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Five Ways to SCORE Big When Overcoming Obstacles and Conflict in Alliance Relationships (Part Two)

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Thursday, April 12, 2018
Updated: Wednesday, April 11, 2018

Part One of this blog post covers how Candido Arreche, CA-AM, global director of portfolio & partner management at Xerox Worldwide Alliances, explained Xerox’s SCORE framework for improving alliance relationships in his 2018 ASAP Global Alliance Summit workshop “Onboarding Your Partner: Understanding How to Design a Partnership that Works.” Xerox adopted the framework to help overcome and make sense of cultural and relationship challenges in alliances, he explained. The template has five important plateaus:

  • Select: (target the right partners)
  • Connect (implement business and personal drivers)
  • Onboarding (create a very structured, easy onboarding process)
  • Revenue (take on and understand the sales)
  • Execute (be on task; take what doesn’t work and make it work)

Part Two of this blog post continues Arreche’s description of how the framework works through implementation.

Most alliance relationships hit a snag. The SCORE tool alerts us when a rough point is coming, Arreche explained. Before Xerox implemented this tool, the company’s partner success rate was a dismal 30 percent. Now it’s over 70 percent, he added. Alliance professionals in large organizations sometimes become enamored with building complex tools. What we really need is something like the SCORE model to focus on the process. It’s simple to use with clear standards. Our tools are typically one-sheeters outlining the steps an alliance manager needs to take and understand what we do every day, he said.

It should be leveraged to everybody working in the alliance. It’s all about continuous improvement with all relationships in the alliance: “SCORE creates a common language that gives alliance partners an easy ways to adapt their course,” he said.

You can ask useful questions with each step of SCORE. Take Select, for example: How do you know how to select the right alliance partner? Then there is Connect, which is probably the most important step. At Xerox, for example, we want our alliance and channel managers asking questions about matching business and personal drivers, Arreche explained. You can ask questions about misaligned objectives—from building a strategy session to building a joint business plan to key performance indicators and metrics. There are two types of drivers in any relationship. Business drivers, which are about the goals for being together, and personal drivers. What are the personal drivers, and how do you understand what’s important to Nathan and what important to me? How do you build trust and make sure the end goals are aligned? Which raises the question of Onboarding. If Nathan is new in the company, what are his drivers? He wants to make this work. He wants to show he has room for promotion and ascending in the company and that his new hire was a good idea. He wants to create brand awareness in his organization. How do you uncover his personal drivers in a fast, easy, simple way to get alignment with both parties? It’s important to set business and personal drivers to get commitment and maximize Revenue. “What’s tough is Execution. How are you going to make it work? What performance measures do we have? What is the timeline for execution?”

When you have SCORE for enhancing communication by designing and asking key questions, you improve relationships, which makes it easier to create and align strategy, he concluded. 

Tags:  alliance relationships  alliances  business driver  Candido Arreche  collaboration  Conflict in Alliance Relationships  connect  Cultural combinations  execute  onboarding  partner management  partners  revenue  SCORE  Select  Xerox Worldwide Alliances 

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Five Ways to SCORE Big When Overcoming Obstacles and Conflict in Alliance Relationships (Part One)

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Wednesday, April 11, 2018

“Every partnership is bringing two cultures together,” explained Candido Arreche, CA-AM, global director of portfolio & partner management at Xerox Worldwide Alliances. He was reminding the audience at his workshop “Onboarding Your Partner: Understanding How to Design a Partnership that Works” about the challenges associated with cultural mergers. The energized presentation recently took place at the 2018 ASAP Global Alliance Summit,  “Propelling Partnering for the On-Demand World: New Perspectives + Proven Practices for Collaborative Business,” in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, USA.

Cultural combinations can be potentially explosive or provide pressure that can act as catalysts for progress and innovation. How you manage them will make the difference in the outcome. Alliances are all about relationships among people, he pointed out, while recalling a trade magazine article that stated that 80 percent of marital relationships are in divorce, separation, or undergoing counseling. In the world of alliances, 50 to 70 percent are in jeopardy. “If we are going to spend time and money to run alliances, we want to make sure they execute,” said the Six Sigma Black Belt.

He then illustrated an emergency landing to drive home his point: US Airways Captain Chesley Burnett “Sully” Sullenberger III’s historic landing on the Hudson River in 2009. The “miraculous” touchdown took place when both engines failed after a run-in with a flock of Canada geese shortly after takeoff.  Sully’s quick thinking under pressure resulted in a hair-raising yet smoothly executed landing that saved all 155 passengers on board.

“How do we execute a landing on a body of water where all passengers survive, which has never been done before?” Arreche then asked. “What was going on? What was going through the pilot’s mind? And how did he execute on it? He was communicating with the airport control tower while under a lot of pressure trying to do what was best for the passengers.”

Sully made great decisions based on three fundamentals that pilots follow, which are similar to how we build frameworks, he purported.

  • They have to aviate—they need to get from point A to point B and keep the plane in the air.
  • They have to navigate—the pilot needs to know the parameters and where he is going.
  • They have to communicate—they need to know how to work the tools to communicate.

Sometimes when we are under severe pressure in our relationships, we seem to not perform. But we need to keep our lives and the alliance going and navigate through the challenges. We need to figure out how to move quickly and overcome resistance, he said. Several years ago, Xerox adopted a framework called SCORE to help overcome and make sense of what’s happening with these types of challenges, he explained. The template has five important plateaus:

  • Select: (target the right partners)
  • Connect (implement business and personal drivers)
  • Onboarding (create a very structured, easy onboarding process)
  • Revenue (take on and understand the sales)
  • Execute (be on task; take what doesn’t work and make it work)

For an explanation of how SCORE can be used to enhance communication and seamless execution in your alliances, see Part II of this blog post. 

Tags:  alliances  business driver  Candido Arreche  collaboration  Conflict in Alliance Relationships  connect  Cultural combinations  execute  onboarding  partner management  partners  revenue  SCORE  Select  Xerox Worldwide Alliances 

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Morphing Your Partnering Philosophy in a Changing World of Digital Drivers (Part One)

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Wednesday, March 28, 2018

Key sectors of the economy are struggling to adapt to disruptions from digital technologies, such as the cloud. The change is resulting in new business models and service sector opportunities in areas such as security and supply chains. In the 2018 ASAP Global Alliance Summit session “Partnering with Change in a World of Ongoing Disruption,” Joe Schramm, vice president of strategic alliances at BeyondTrust, and Morgan Wheaton, senior director, global partner alliances & channels at JDA Software, addressed the huge transformations taking place in these sectors. BeyondTrust has been a provider of cybersecurity software since 1985. JDA Software is one of the largest providers of supply chain and retail technology. The following insights and excerpts from the session drill down to the core of some of today’s most pressing partnering questions during a time of digital transformation:

Joe Schramm: In traditional channels, it’s about “How much product can I sell?” It’s now about “How much value-added service can I provide?” If you can’t adapt [to that new model], you will be out of business.

Morgan Wheaton: The way that you manage cash flow as a software company has changed to subscription-based. But making that change from large payments to a little every month is a chasm that some companies can’t cross.

Schramm: Our origins are more in network operations, but today, we offer complete solutions in privilege access management (PAM) and are a recognized leader in the market. BeyondTrust’s job is to protect companies from bad actors. There are three types of bad actors: nation state-sponsored actors, such as Russia, China, etc., that are after intellectual property to get trade secrets; “hacktavists”; identity thieves. They break the perimeter through fishing with suspicious email links or known vulnerabilities—such as the Microsoft operating system, Adobe, your car, pacemaker, the Grid—to gain access and control. Once in, they try to hijack privileges. Our technology  is used to reduce administrator rights. What’s new is that more in the manufacturing sector are starting to wake up and realize their IP is being compromised. Meeting those customer needs and adapting to digital technologies required rethinking partnering.

The old paradigm:

  • We sold tools; installed them
  • Partnered with resellers to fulfill
  • Systems integrators viewed as competitive
  • No strategy to extend reach

The new paradigm:

  • We sell complex solutions; partners implement
  • Partners sourcing and implementing new businesses
  • Systems integrators are strategic partners
  •   We can’t grow fast enough

Wheaton: At JDA, our customers are some of the biggest companies out there, such as all 15 of the top car companies; 60 percent of soap makers; 70 percent of prescriptions get filled by JDA software. We are seeing their world being disrupted by the cloud. Consider what Amazon is doing by creating a standard for customers where they can order a product by mail that can be returned in a day. They are setting a new bar, and retailers are undergoing massive disruption and asking “How do we compete with this?” Manufacturers need to innovate and deliver in record time. Distributors must reinvent themselves to remain relevant. What does this mean for JDA? Every CEO out there is rethinking their supply chain. We are seeing very much the same things at supply chain companies as they are at security companies. In the old paradigm, systems integrators were viewed as competitors. We partnered opportunistically—there was little standardization.

The old paradigm:

  • We offer turnkey solutions
  • Service partners only extend JDA delivery capacity
  • Systems integrators viewed as competitive
  • No need to extend reach
  • Partner opportunistically

The new paradigm

  • Together we grow the pie
  • Partners help to complete the solution
  • Systems integrators are strategic partners
  • We can’t grow fast enough
  • Partner with intent

We had to reinvent our program with three components:  Consulting partners, to help with implementation and customer strategy; tech partners; selling partners.

So how do you recognize and strategize for the current and anticipated future paradigm shifts? Schramm and Wheaton took turns answering this question, which was relevant to both industries:

  • Practice Open Communication: with partners, customers, and industry leaders.
  • Observe the Competition: What are they messaging? Are you losing your partners?
  • Watch Market Makers.
  • Watch Start-ups—how they are disrupting and how they are doing.

Part II of this post will address how key cultural changes are needed to better enable new partnering models. 

Tags:  alliances  BeyondTrust  channels  communication  cybersecurity software  disruption  implementation  JDA Software  partner  Partnering Philosophy  partners  servic  start-ups 

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The Beatles, Alliances in the C-Suite, and a Company Built on Strategic Partnerships (Part 2): Citrix Chief Marketing Officer Kicks off the ASAP Global Alliance Summit

Posted By John W. DeWitt, Tuesday, March 27, 2018

ASAP Global Alliance Summit keynoter Tim Minahan, an English and political science major and graduate of the Kellogg School of Management’s Chief Marketing Officer Program, joined $3.2 billion Citrix about two years ago. The senior vice president of strategy and chief marketing officer framed his presentation around the theme of “everything I ever needed to know about strategic alliances I learned from the Beatles.”

His first point—“or what I learned from John, Paul, and Ringo”—emphasized the importance of driving growth “With a Little Help from My Friends,” a hit song from 1967’s Yellow Submarine. “The fastest way to grow, to scale, is to trade on someone who has established networks and relationships,” Minahan explained, referring back to the beginnings of Citrix nearly three decades ago. “Back then it was Microsoft—so it made tremendous sense that founders of Citrix made a business out of making it easier for IT to migrate to the Microsoft platform,” he said.

“This carries through even to today,” Minahan continued. “Today, on day one, we’re there to provide our solutions whenever Microsoft launches new solutions. …  As many of you know, Microsoft has a sell-through model. So we’ve predicated our investment, ensuring we’re building the right enablement and incentives for Microsoft and its channel partners.” The size of this partnering opportunity? He cited projections of “a $1 trillion market cap business for Microsoft migrating to the cloud.”

Minahan talked in some depth about swimming in the sea of coopetition, including how Citrix has partnered with Google and Cisco to enable functionality for Microsoft’s office software on the latest generation of Android phones. He peppered his talk with repeated references to “incentivizing your partners” and emphasized one of his key initiatives to radically streamline marketing Citrix campaigns and make joint marketing much simpler for partners.

“When I joined Citrix two years ago, we had over 40 different marketing campaigns. It was very difficult for alliances partners and salespeople to understand,” he explained. “This year, we have three primary campaigns aligned with business outcomes: employee experience and productivity, security and compliance, and choice. We’ve lined up our leading strategic alliances within each of those. … That’s the type of investment we’re making to drive up the ROI,” he added.

“Alliances is really a strategic leader,” Minahan noted during the Q&A that followed his talk. “I elevated our alliance marketing leader. She sits on the marketing leadership team, and we include strategic alliances as we build the market plan, not as an afterthought. That also signals to our organization and our partners that we are very serious about alliances.”

Other Beatles-inspired alliance management insights from Minahan included:

  •  “Come Together”—“make yourselves an essential component by fostering value between partners.”
  • “Tax Man”—“find a common enemy. It could be a common business challenge, not necessarily a competitor.”
  • “A Day in the Life”—“always put the customer first.”
  • “Help!”– “make the investment to ensure our partners and channel can be successful and—I can’t say it enough—incentives.”
  •  “Revolution”—“have a common vision for a better future. We all want to be a part of something great that is transforming the world.” 

Tags:  Alliances  Cisco  Citrix  C-Suite  Google  marketing campaigns  Microsoft  strategic leader  Strategic Partnerships  Tim Minahan 

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