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ASAP and WorkSpan Announce a Partnership to Strengthen Their Collaboration and Grow the Ecosystem Community

Posted By Kimberly Miller, Monday, September 30, 2019
Updated: Monday, September 30, 2019

WorkSpan and the Association of Strategic Alliance Professionals (ASAP), two organizations that are deeply engaged with alliance and ecosystem professionals, are proud to announce a new partnership designed to grow and enhance both organizations’ abilities to deliver world-class services to these communities.

WorkSpan is the category leader for Ecosystem Cloud where alliance, channel, and ecosystem leaders connect, co-create, co-market, co-sell, measure, and scale with their ecosystem partners in a single, secure network to grow business together.  ASAP is the only nonprofit, professional association and community which certifies and is dedicated to elevating and promoting the profession of alliance, partnerships, and ecosystems management. 

Over recent years, ASAP and WorkSpan have collaborated on a number of engagements, joint marketing activities, event sponsorships, and joint communications.  

In order to strengthen and deepen that collaboration, today the organizations announce a new partnership, working together on a number of dimensions with the intention of delivering greater service to our shared communities of alliance and ecosystem professionals.

The partnership covers a number of strategic programs in five primary dimensions including:

  • Global and local chapter events
  • Training and certifications(strategic-alliances.org)
  • Online community (AllianceAces.com)
  • Content around alliances and ecosystems
  • Alliance and ecosystems best practices

Through this partnership, WorkSpan and ASAP see the opportunity to strengthen each organizations’ mission and provide greater opportunities for ASAP to deliver high-quality resources to alliance professionals and grow to support additional programs in the future.

 

“ASAP and WorkSpan are ideal partners that support ASAP’s goals to develop, educate, and grow its community of practitioners, in addition to helping them identify the best processes andpractices to manage their partnerships and ecosystems successfully,” said Mike Leonetti, president and CEO of the Association of Strategic Alliance Professionals.

 

“We’ve always had the highest regard for ASAP as a professional association and have enjoyed collaborating with Mike and the ASAP Board over the years.  We look forward to a strong partnership that will deliver immediate benefits to the alliance and ecosystem professionals’ community.”  said Amit Sinha, co-founder and chief customer officer, WorkSpan.

 

The partnership is managed by WorkSpan’s Vice President of Marketing, Chip Rodgers and Mike Leonetti of ASAP. As part of the agreement, Mike Leonetti will join the Alliance Aces community board and Greg Fox, WorkSpan general manager for the communications & networking industry, will join the ASAP advisory board.

 

About ASAP

The Association of Strategic Alliance Professionals (ASAP) is the only professional association dedicated to elevating and promoting the profession of alliance, partnerships, and ecosystems management. Founded in 1998, the organization provides professional development, networking, and resources for cultivating the skills and toolsets needed to manage successful business partnerships. ASAP’s professional certifications include the Certificate of Achievement-Alliance Management (CA-AM) and Certified Strategic Alliance Professional (CSAP).  Find out more about key ASAP events, webinars, and other content at http://www.strategic-alliances.org.

 

Link to the announcement by WorkSpan 

About WorkSpan

WorkSpan is the Category Leader for Ecosystem Cloud.  With Ecosystem Cloud, our customers are capturing a disproportionate share of the Ecosystem Economy — and you can too.  Join the WorkSpan network where alliance, channel, and ecosystem leaders connect, co-create, co-market, co-sell, measure, and scale with their ecosystem partners in a single, secure network to grow business together.

 

WorkSpan is a privately held company backed by Mayfield and is growing its network of global enterprise customers including SAP, Cisco, Microsoft, Accenture, Google, SAS, VMware, NetApp, Nutanix, NTT Data, Lenovo, and others.

Tags:  alliance  Amit Sinha  collaboration  ecosystem  partnership  strategic programs  WorkSpan 

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Where Hope IS the Strategy: Customizing Alliance Management to Fight Deadly Disease

Posted By Michael J. Burke, Monday, September 30, 2019
Updated: Friday, September 27, 2019

      Andre Turenne began his Wednesday keynote address at the 2019 ASAP BioPharma Conference , held Sept. 23­–25 in Boston, by reminding everyone why biopharma companies form partnerships in the first place: to more effectively find and create new medicines and treatments that will improve patient health outcomes—and in some cases, with the fervent hope of one day preventing or arresting the progress of currently untreatable diseases.

      Turenne, since July 2018 the president and CEO of Voyager Therapeutics, started off his keynote presentation, “Fit for Purpose Alliance Management: Why Customization Matters,” by telling the story of Kyle Bryant, an inspirational and determined young man who was diagnosed at age 17 with Friedreich’s ataxia (FA). The diagnosis of FA, a progressive and eventually fatal disease, means that Bryant will gradually lose motor function and speech. But he has been making the most of his life in the meantime, among other things founding and directing a cross-US bike ride called rideATAXIA—billed as “the world’s toughest bike race”—to benefit the Friedreich’s Ataxia Research Alliance (FARA), and with his friend Sean Baumstark cohosting a podcast, Two Disabled Dudes.

      Bryant is also the subject of an award-winning 2015 documentary, The Ataxian, which shows how he participated in and ultimately completed the grueling cross-country bike ride. Turenne showed the audience the trailer for the film, in which Bryant said of the debilitating disease, “There’s a way to fight it. And there’s always hope.”

      Turenne and his company are trying to translate that inspiring attitude into a forward-thinking strategic vision. Through their commercial collaboration with Neurocrine Biosciences, Voyager Therapeutics is working on treatments in the areas of Friedreich’s ataxia and Parkinson’s disease (PD). In addition, the Voyager pipeline includes a partnership with Abbvie around treatments for Alzheimer’s disease and related conditions.

      Around 6000 people in the US have FA, which is being targeted by gene replacement therapy. About a million Americans have PD; they lose the ability to produce dopamine, which controls motor function, so the goal is to mitigate that loss to help restore motor activity.

      Especially for a small company like Voyager, “collaboration is of the utmost importance,” Turenne acknowledged. “Who we choose to work with and how…has a huge bearing on what we do. And no two collaborations are alike, so we need a customized approach to alliance management.”

      Turenne may be the rare example of a CEO who came up through the ranks of alliance management and business development, but as ASAP president and CEO Mike Leonetti said, he’s “living proof” that it is possible. Or as Turenne explained, “The phenotype of a CEO is changing as the industry is changing. If you talk with VCs, there is no fixed stereotype of what a CEO should be.”

      Perhaps Turenne’s AM/BD experience also contributes to his keen interest in partnering with companies that “punch above their weight in the execution of this function.”

      In Turenne’s thinking, the key factors when considering forming an alliance are:

  • Each company’s size, strategy, and areas of focus
  • The partnered program’s relative importance to each company
  • The other company’s (your potential partner’s) alliance management experience and organizational setup
  • The evolution of any of the above factors for either company over time

      As Turenne put it, “We’re only as good as the way we can work together.” And while he said he doesn’t like to talk about companies with less alliance management expertise as the “weak link,” the success or failure of a given alliance often boils down to the level of the least experienced player. How to bridge that gap to “customize and calibrate the relationship” then becomes the big challenge.

      Add to that a burgeoning biopharma industry that is far from static, and change must be assumed—and anticipated and planned for in advance. The original setup of the alliance, however well structured, may no longer apply given changing market conditions, turnover in either organization, or companies’ shifting strategies, so alliance managers must be agile enough to pivot and adapt to these altered states.

      Among the trends Turenne has seen that have significant implications for biopharma alliance management are:

  • Well-capitalized biotechs seeking to collaborate with smaller companies
  • Big pharma companies trying to “act smaller” and be more nimble and flexible
  • The massive movement of talent across the industry, which means a greater cross-fertilization of alliance management approaches throughout biopharma

      After a dozen years at Genzyme—where he established the alliance management function—and later its eventual acquirer Sanofi, Turenne came on board at Voyager in 2018 already convinced of the importance of alliance management and the need to tailor and customize its application to the partnerships at hand. And having been in senior positions in companies large and small, he has some thoughts on how big and small companies can partner effectively.

      One key is to understand and acknowledge each company’s experience with partnering and how each one works. Ideally then each company can stretch toward the other and meet in the middle in terms of establishing their joint partnering capability.

      “Any effort in a humble way [for a bigger company] to share experience with the smaller partner can have a big impact,” Turenne explained. The larger partner can try to flex to meet the needs of the smaller partner so the gap between them is lessened. At a conference whose theme was “Bridging the Many Divides,” Turenne’s words certainly resonated.

      When he looks into the future, Turenne hopes that the partnership with Neurocrine around FA and PD will still be active in five years. But will they succeed in helping patients with these serious conditions? Turenne feels that Voyager’s continuing efforts to enhance and customize its alliance management capabilities will “improve our chances of making a big impact for patients.” 

Tags:  Alliance Management  André Turenne  biopharma  capabilities  collaboration  Friedreich’s ataxia (FA)  Kyle Bryant  partnerships  patient health outcomes  rideATAXIA  strategy  Voyager Therapeutics 

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A Lesson From the Whiz Kids: Change and Teams— ‘An Inevitable Combination’

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Monday, July 22, 2019

My father, who recently passed away, worked for Ford Motor Company in its heyday. A 1950  graduate of Harvard Business School and a former Marine in World War II and the Korean War, he started working at  Ford in 1953 and eventually worked under Ford President Robert McNamara, who later became the longest-serving secretary of defense in United States history under Presidents  John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson.

 

Ford Motor Company was losing millions in the post-  WWII era, but turned a corner through innovative production and management. Seeking new ways to succeed in a time of rapid change (sound familiar?), the company engaged in a unique partnership with a group of United States Air Force officers. Ford would provide the young men just out of the military with jobs and, in turn, the former officers would revamp the company. Disparagingly dubbed the “Quiz Kids” by fellow employees for their youthful questioning, they renamed themselves the “Whiz Kids.” As a manager in finance, production programming, sales, marketing, personnel, and technical and transportation operations, my father worked under their guidance to help reorganize Ford’s financial framework, redefine corporate culture, and contribute to automotive innovation.

 

After my father’s memorial service, I pored over the books in his library. You can tell a lot about a person from the books he or she reads. Based on the collective mix, he pursued self-education to the end, especially in the areas of business, history, leadership—and the art of fly fishing. The mix included tomes such as Doris Kearns Goodwin’s The Bully Pulpit and Nigel Hamilton’s The Mantle of Command. But what really caught my eye was an unassuming slip of a book: The Wisdom of Teams: Creating the High–Performance Organization, by Jon R. Katzenbach and Douglas K. Smith, Harvard Business School Press, 1993. As I paged through, I found only one sentence in the entire book underlined. In the chapter “Teams and Major Change: An Inevitable Combination,” the final sentence on Page 211 was highlighted: “It is no accident, then, that every single major change effort we know about has depended on teams.”

 

Through landmark business reconstruction and major wars my father had significant life experience leading and participating in successful teams. He must have come away from those experiences with an understanding of how major change is conjoined with well-organized teamwork. At age 93, the concept of digital transformation was a mystery to him, but the strategy necessary for such radical transformation was very familiar: Major change requires visionary leadership, well-orchestrated collaboration, and flexible innovation.

 

History can teach us a lot about successful collaboration. That connection came through at a ASAP BioPharma Conference in a session on “Alliance Management  Learnings from Great Leaders,” led by Harm-Jan Borgeld, head of alliance management at Merck KGaA;  David Thompson, CSAP, chief alliance officer at Eli Lilly and Company; Steven Twait, CSAP, vice president, alliance and integration management at AstraZeneca. The three alliance professionals probed questions about the “Big Three” WWII alliance led by Winston Churchill,  Franklin Delano Roosevelt, and Joseph Stalin—and how history’s lessons learned relate to today’s strategic alliances.

 

When designed and executed well, alliances can resolve conflict, innovate solutions, win wars, and rejuvenate flagging companies. Collaboration can even streamline services in the public sector and define the  workplace cultures of successful 21st century companies like Jazz Pharmaceuticals. For my father’s generation and for ours, it still comes down to inspired leaders and engaged executives who grapple with change by fostering a culture of teamwork and collaboration— and embrace partners along their journey forward. My dad would recognize this approach as “an inevitable combination.” 

Tags:  Alliances  AstraZeneca  Collaboration  David Thompson  Eli Lilly and Company  Harm-Jan Borgeld  Innovation  Jazz Pharmaceuticals  Merck KGaA  Steve Twait 

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The Sound of Success

Posted By Michael Leonetti, CSAP, Wednesday, July 10, 2019

In a past issue of Strategic Alliance Monthly, we asked Bruce Cozadd, cofounder and chief executive of Jazz  Pharmaceuticals, Could Music Be the Secret Sauce of Compelling Collaborative Leaders?

 

“This concept of individual excellence, but it’s all about how you play as a group, really resonates to me as a management philosophy,” explained Cozadd, not merely a scientist, but also a classically trained musician who routinely plays all requests on the company piano while surrounded by  singing employees. “It’s a playful, energetic theme that fits perfectly with alliance management,” chimed Ann Kilrain, Jazz’s head of alliance management. “We recognize that while individuals are able to accomplish much as individuals,

we create something much greater together.”

 

The musician-CEO and his CAO continue their remarkable riff on the topic of collaborative leadership, discussing how leaders model their  organization’s values and specifically about how alliance leaders can impact the culture of an organization—change it, grow it, and help it prosper. Talk about resonance. In my observation, the best partnering companies have leaders who display the qualities Bruce Cozadd projects. And the best alliance executives model transparent leadership with partners and bring that same style to their internal leadership and alliance team culture.

 

Cozadd reminds me of my former CEO and the straightforward model I developed when I was his alliance leader.

I call it The Four Cs of Alliance Leadership:

  • Communication
  • Culture
  • Collaboration
  • Compromise

Communication. And I mean all the time. Overcommunication is the name of the game. But remember, as the late Stephen Covey taught, “Seek first to understand.” Every day you need to ask yourself, in your internal leadership role, are you seeking to understand in the way you would with your partner? Then, given that understanding, are you providing the constant, effective communication required to be understood?

 

Culture. My CEO used to tell me, “Don’t lose your soul.” He wasn’t discussing matters of faith, rather, of culture. He defined culture as what made our company great. Culture eats everything—breakfast, lunch, and dinner. But it has to be good culture—most of us have struggled uphill to partner when we work in the opposite kind of corporate culture. In a good culture, everyone is respected, not just the boss; everyone, including the boss, is accountable, expected to be open, honest, trustworthy.

 

Collaboration. That’s what we do with partners—but are you demonstrating and practicing a partner mindset within your own organization? Again, not easy. You may be criticized, you may be challenged, you may be asked who do you work for—us or them? But when you break through—when collaborative leadership begins to become part of your culture, supported by your CEO— you’re going to be wildly successful with your partners.

 

Compromise. True leaders model, every day, the ability to compromise without abdicating. Never compromise your goal. Instead, seek greatness, but understand the solution you define together will be the solution that will make you successful. You have to define it together, with your colleague or your partner, which means you have to compromise.

 

Notice that “Command” doesn’t appear in my Four C’s of Alliance Leadership. Any enduring leader knows how to command, but great partnering organizations, and great companies, get great results because people truly invest, not because they’re told what to do. Partners work the same way, as Cozadd recognizes.

 

“When we start discussions with a potential partner,” he explains in this issue, “my comment to our team is, ‘If we’re successful, we’re going to end up working with those people on the other side of the table. Let’s start treating them from the first time we meet them with respect, transparency, honesty. No hide-the-ball, no misrepresentation of our interests. They should come out with a high degree of trust in everyone. It has to be the whole team.’”

 

Call it conducting the collaborative symphony—or, simply, the sound of success. 

Tags:  Alliance Leadership  Bruce Cozadd  Collaboration  Communication  Compromise  Culture  Jazz Pharmaceuticals  Music  Resonance  Strategic Alliances  The Four Cs 

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Discovery across Sectors—and Generations

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Monday, July 8, 2019

Academic Partnering Gives Industry a Chance to Magnify Discovery—and Foster the Personal and Career Growth of Millennials

 

One of the benefits of academic collaboration is that industry has the opportunity to foster the personal and career growth of millennials. The academic collaboration article in Strategic Alliance Magazine highlights the Johns Hopkins University-MedImmune Scholars Program. We need more of these types of academic collaborations to support innovation, and also the young minds so eager to engage in finding the next great breakthrough for society. During an ASAP Global Alliance Summit Keynote Speaker Alex Dickinson, senior vice president of strategic initiatives at Illumina, has pointed out, innovation has the power to lead to the end of disease. Are we ready for that kind of transformation?

 

I was reminded of the need to find ways that industry can engage millennials in innovation when my daughter and I swapped articles over the weekend. A technology buff with a gift for writing, she was interested in the advances and inventions noted at the beginning of the academic collaboration cover story. She also found the accompanying interview with Star Trek: The Next Generation writer and gaming aficionado Lee Sheldon intriguing, because he instructs a generation of millennials born and bred on futuristic worlds where technology can teach the joy of progress through teamwork and collaboration.

 

As I looked over my daughter’s essay, I marveled at how our work intertwined. She had selected the theme of “discovery” for this semester’s English class with the task of relating it to each book she reads. Her assignment was to relate discovery to Ayn Rand’s Anthem. My assignment for this issue of the magazine was to probe the value of discovery in relation to academic collaboration and industry.

 

“Discovery’s everywhere. It is fueled by the desire to learn and demands the yearning to grow. The uncovering of a new fascination is the manifestation of discovery. This love for learning is cherished and leads one to bigger and larger opportunities for growth; for without discovery one would not be introduced to areas where growth is needed,” she wrote. “Anthem brings to light the impact of discovery in societies, and shows that without it, one cannot advance or improve.”

 

The protagonist in Anthem is Equality 7-2521, an intelligent, non-conforming thinker who has been relegated to the career of street sweeping. Educating himself secretly by candlelight, he reinvents electricity during a moment of inspiration. Electricity was banned to keep the masses under control, but Equality 7-2521 realizes the revolutionary potential of his discovery if turned into an invention and manufactured because it would make life easier and also could foster other inventions, furthering societal growth. He takes the reinvention to the World Council of Scholars, the so-called greatest thinkers from around the world. But the government system has sapped them of their creativity, consensus-building, and collaborative abilities on even the simplest of innovations. Equality 7-2521 is then punished for his efforts to think out of the box and runs away.

 

“Discovery is the secret ingredient for the progression of a person or society. Without discovery, there would not be the realization that there could or needs to be improvement,” my daughter concluded. “The challenge to break free from other’s restrictions or our own is a daily struggle. When we transcend personal limitation and government obstruction, our capability to grow increases.”

 

While innovation needs some government limitations in place, such as safety and ethical guidelines, excessive restriction goes against the grain in human nature, as my daughter points out. Discovery, innovation, and manufacturing are an innate and necessary component of a healthy society. Clearly, academia is a seedbed for ideas. If nurtured properly with appropriate creative and financial resources, and combined with collaborative zeal, it can result in a cornucopia of benefits to industry and society. Many millennials are waiting in the wings for the opportunity to engage in discovery provided by a well-designed industry-academic program. It’s well worth considering as part of your overall alliance management strategy. 

Tags:  Collaboration  Forward Thinking  Millennials  Strategic Alliances  Technological Benefits 

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