My Profile   |   Print Page   |   Contact Us   |   Sign In   |   Register
ASAP Blog
Blog Home All Blogs
Welcome to ASAP Blog, the best place to stay current regarding upcoming events, member companies, the latest trends, and leaders in the industry. Blogs are posted at least once a week; members may subscribe to receive notifications when new blogs are posted by clicking the "Subscribe" link above.

 

Search all posts for:   

 

Top tags: alliance management  alliances  collaboration  partnering  alliance  alliance managers  partner  partners  alliance manager  partnerships  ecosystem  The Rhythm of Business  partnership  governance  Jan Twombly  biopharma  Strategic Alliance Magazine  Eli Lilly and Company  Vantage Partners  IoT  ASAP BioPharma Conference  healthcare  NetApp  strategy  2015 ASAP Global Alliance Summit  Cisco  communication  IBM  innovation  Strategic Alliances 

Finalists and Winners Share the Accolades at Upbeat 2018 Alliance Excellence Awards Ceremony

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Wednesday, March 28, 2018

Celebrating hard work, innovation, generous contributions to society, volunteer time, and other accomplishments, ASAP lauded several companies and partnerships at the 2018 ASAP Alliance Excellence Awards on March 26 during the ASAP Global Alliance Summit, “Propelling Partnering for the On-Demand World: New Perspectives + Proven Practices for Collaborative Business,” in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, USA.

“All of our finalists are winners. They really are” through their thoughtful engagement, documentation, and impressive submissions, said Michael Leonetti, CSAP, president and CEO of ASAP. “It’s so difficult to select” a winner from such an outstanding pool of finalists, he then observed.

Referring to the 20th anniversary of ASAP’s beginnings, Norma Watenpaugh, CSAP, ASAP Advisory Board member and founding principal of Phoenix Consulting Group, provided some history about the first ASAP awards ceremony in 2001 and the evolution of the judging process. An “old-timer” and chair of the Excellence Awards Committee, she joined the judging process in 2003. “Some have been on the committee from the beginning of time, some are new recruits—reading, scoring, and deciding on nominees. They represent different industries,” she explained. What originally started as one lone awards category in 2001 evolved into multiple awards, which were captured at the ceremony by five of nine finalists for their exceptional contributions:

The Alliance Program Excellence Award, presented to organizations instilling the capability to consistently implement and manage alliance portfolios and demonstrate success of those alliances over time, was given to pharmaceutical Amgen for its exceptional biopharma alliance program. Secured by three pillars, the program delineates clear roles and alignment of strategic objectives and value drivers through a partnership; ensures best practice execution on every alliance through an alliance kickoff and playbook; optimizes oversight of Amgen’s alliance portfolio.

The Individual Alliance Excellence Award, presented to a specific alliance for excellence in planning, implementation, and resultseither between two companies or multiple organizationsfor instituting practices, tools, and methodologies in support of successful formation and management, was given to pharmaceutical partners MSD and Julphar for the formation of the DUNES alliance. The alliance serves seven therapeutic areas for six countries in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region, a challenging area of the world for business development. “Alliances aren’t business as usual in that part of the world, and MSD-Julphar opened new doors,” commented Watenpaugh when presenting the award.

Two Innovative Best Alliance Practice Awards, presented to a company for individual alliance management tools, functions, methods, or processes that have made an immediate and powerful impact on the organization and/or discipline of alliance management, were given to pharmaceuticals MedImmune and Shire “for their big-picture view in their portfolio of alliances.” The high-impact tool or process used must show results, such as easing management, saving costs, increasing speed, and/or growing revenue. Medimmune received the award for an alliance information management system and dashboard reporting tools that enable widespread visibility of alliance performance in near-real time, including consolidation of alliance data that provides visibility across the organization. Shire received the award for introducing a new best practice for partner crisis to manage stakeholders through a crisis situation. The system was originally developed to help navigate a merger; it has since been tested and validated for several additional applications.

The Alliance for Corporate Social Responsibility Award is presented to companies that demonstrate a profound, measurable, and positive social impact, with the principal objective social impact, not profit—although profit, especially if used to fund program expansion, is not discouraged. This year’s award was given to Cisco Systems and Dimension Data. The companies banded together for their 25-year celebration of alliance success by kicking off 25 projects focused on creating social good, which resulted in a record year for the partnership.

Not to be forgotten for their exceptional contributions, Leonetti also presented several Chapter Excellence Awards to members who have gone above and beyond in volunteer time organizing quality events within a local geography “because they love what they do.” The New England, French, Midwest (honorable mention), and Research Triangle Park chapters received awards for their use of best practices, development of relationships in the community, strong commitment, exceptional programming, and an array of additional contributions. Leonetti then extended special thanks to Becky Lockwood, CSAP, leader of the ASAP Chapter Presidents Council, for her leadership in organizing and keeping the chapter work effectively and smoothly flowing. 

Tags:  2018 ASAP Alliance Excellence Awards  Amgen  biopharma alliance program  Cisco Systems  collaboration  dashboard  Dimension Data  DUNES alliance  Julphar  MedImmune  MSD  partnership  Shire 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Q1 2018 Strategic Alliance Magazine: The Changing Face of Data Security in Multi-partnering; Insights from Genpact’s Donna Peek; Global Alliance Summit Preview; Happy 20th, ASAP!

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Monday, March 12, 2018
Updated: Saturday, March 10, 2018

Is your company risking underinvestment in data security during a time of major digital transformation? That’s one of the big questions posed in the 2018 Q1 Strategic Alliance Magazine, which is packed with information on emerging security trends that impact today’s evolving multi-industry, multi-partnering ecosystem. “The amount of digital disruption that is occurring—whether in IoT sensors, new business models, the amount of data being produced every day, and the introduction of the cryp­tocurrencies—is creating unlimited opportunities for threat factors … that bad actors can attack,” remarks Steve Benvenuto, senior director in the global security part­ner sales organization at Cisco Systems.

Adding to that challenge: “At the current churn rate, about half of all S&P 500 companies will be replaced over the next ten years,” according to Innosight management consulting company. Risking a security breach in the present climate could be the straw that breaks the camel’s back. The package of articles provides insights on implementing and maintaining secure systems, especially in light of evolving multi-industry, multi-partnering business models. Citing the US government’s 2017 release of its first “Guidelines and Practices for Multi-Party Vulnerability Coordination and Disclosure,” the articles delve into a range of related cutting-edge topics:

  • Evolving blockchain technology, a promising new framework for supply chain security
  • Case studies on innovative new supply chain models in the pharmaceutical, automotive, shipping, food, and other industries, as explained by NetApp’s Ron Long, CSAP
  •  “Digital Transformation > Changing Business Models > the Impact on Security in Partnering,” what alliance managers need to know to stay abreast of the change, through the eyes of Philip Sack, CSAP, of CollaboRare & the Digital Leadership Institute
  • A behavioral scientist’s perspective on why CEO and company leaders tend to underinvest in security
  • Ideas for onboarding company culture and security protocols for an easy transition on the digital transformation wave

Companies need to carpe diem in this unprecedented, fast-evolving era of digital transformation, adds Donna Peek, CSAP, vice president of global alliances at Genpact, in this issue’s Member Spotlight. “Alliances have never been more strategic and collaboration skills never more vital to corporate success,” says Peek, a highly experienced alliance manager and member of the ASAP Board of Directors. She then provides readers with best practices and solid guideposts necessary for maneuvering today’s obstacle course of disruptions and digital transformation drivers.

The security package is not the only highlight of this issue: 2018 is ASAP’s 20th anniversary since its creation in 1998, a notable milestone that shows the foresight of its founders and value of its mission. Personal accounts and insights into the association’s evolution are provided by ASAP’s President and CEO Michael Leonetti, CSAP, as well as early thought leaders Robert Porter Lynch, CSAP, and Ard-Pieter de Man, CSAP. “[D]espite the indelible mark we’ve made in business—al­liance management is an essential function and capability in a wide array of leading companies and industries—we still need to roll up our sleeves today with the same bold­ness and vision that our founders had two decades ago. This is a call to action to all of you who are a part of this remarkable journey,” writes Leonetti in his Up Front column.

This issue then provides a synopsis of what’s to come at the 2018 ASAP Global Alliance Summit, “Propelling Partnering for the On-Demand World: New Perspectives + Prov­en Practices for Collaborative Business,” to be held March 26-28 in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, USA. After providing perspective on the first Summit in 1999, during an era of boom boxes and floppy disks, the articles gives readers agenda highlights, previews of four plenary talks, workshop information, and a who’s who of finalists for the 2018 ASAP Alliance Excellence Awards

Tags:  alliance managers  Best Practices  blockchain  breach  collaboration  data security  digital transformation  Donna Peek  Genpact  IoT  multi-industry  multi-partnerhing  NetApp  Phil Sack  Ron Long  Strategic Alliance Magazine  supply chain 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Tiffani Bova, Global Customer Growth & Innovation Evangelist at Salesforce, Joins the ASAP Advisory Board

Posted By John W. DeWitt and Cynthia B. Hanson, Wednesday, February 7, 2018

Saleforce evangelist and former Gartner analyst Tiffani Bova has quickly become a familiar face in the ASAP community over the past year, presenting two well-received talks at ASAP events—first, at the March 2017 Summit in San Diego, and again in June, when Bova helped to kick off the inaugural 2017 ASAP Tech Partner Forum in Silicon Valley.

On Feb. 2, ASAP officially announced (see http://www.prweb.com/releases/2018/02/prweb15161458.htm) that Tiffani Bova, global customer growth and innovation evangelist at Salesforce, has joined ASAP’s global advisory board. As a high-tech industry thought leader, Bova watches overall market trends to uncover best practices on how to improve sales performance and enhance the overall customer experience.

“We are thrilled to have Tiffani as a board member. She has already made a significant impact by presenting in 2017 at two of ASAP’s four signature events, the ASAP Global Alliance Summit and the ASAP Tech Partner Forum,” said Michael Leonetti, CSAP, president and CEO of ASAP.

Bova is a respected former Gartner analyst and popular keynoter. In her talks at both 2017 ASAP events, Bova addressing ways companies of all sizes can create new business practices that leverage technology to strengthen collaboration with customers and partners and accelerate sales and growth. She challenged the audience to recognize how in the business-to-business world, “customer and partner expectations are changing” thanks to technologies that were previously considered relevant only in the business-to-consumer world. 

See the official ASAP press release at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2018/02/prweb15161458.htm. To learn more about Salesforce and how the company empowers companies to connect with their customers, visit www.salesforce.com.

Tags:  accelerate sales and growth  best practices  business-to-consumer  collaboration  Gartner  Salesforce  Tiffani Bova 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Millennials, Entrepreneurs, and the Push and Pull of the Crowd—an Interview with Lorin Coles (Part Two)

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Monday, January 22, 2018
Updated: Friday, January 19, 2018

During a recent interview for the Q4 2017 Strategic Alliance Magazine, I spoke with Lorin Coles, CSAP, CEO and managing director of Alliancesphere, an alliance management and collaboration consulting business, on the topics of innovation, out-of-the-box thinking, and creativity in business partnering (see “Giving Birth to Innovation: The Brainchild of Out-of-the-Box Thinking”). Coles had many insightful and inspiring ideas on the topic, and due to limited space, some of these ideas didn’t make it into the magazine.

Following is Part Two of our two-part blog post based on additional materials from the interview with Coles. We pick up the story of The Coca-Cola Company, which as looking to build joint, adjacent business models and innovation practices, and how Coles and the American Israeli Chamber of Commerce began working with Coke’s chief innovation officer across the brands to on a trip to Israel.

Coles: Israel is sometimes called “the start-up nation.” Tel Aviv feels like a combination of New York, Los Angeles, and Silicon Valley. People there have this belief that anything is possible, and it’s very contagious. They are not trying to do incremental innovation. They are trying to do breakthroughs. We put together meetings there with universities, venture capitalists, governments, entrepreneurs, and the incubator system. So everyone was well prepared with the kinds of things Coca-Cola was looking for to innovate. Coca-Cola already had a strong bottler in Israel but did not have a company-to-country innovation model. All kinds of deals and R&D came out of that. On the tech side, Weizmann Institute, Tel Aviv University, and the Volcani Institute ended up signing big agreements. Coca-Cola ended up creating a partnership with venture capital firms on the supply chain side. They created BRIDGE, and started looking at Israel from the tech, Internet, retail, and consumer side. It went from ingredients, supply chain, and water to information technology. That model has now been replicated around the world, including in China—both BRIDGE and an innovation hub were created. For me, all this falls under the umbrella of collaborative innovation, which involves collaborating and innovating differently by setting up hubs where certain parts of the world have capabilities.

The Crowd Factor
From the 1980s until now, I can track every big wave from a tech innovation standpoint. Over the past 40 years, the one thing I found was that every time disruptive tech occurred—you have the disruptor versus who is being affected—the leaders resist the change. They try their best, but in the end, the market wins. The customer is pulling it because:

  1. The experience is better.
  2. A network of ecosystem applications is built and driven around the change (the PC revolution and client server system drove it for many years, then mobile tech).
  3. Open systems, standards, and the market pull it (consider Über, it’s simpler and better than getting a taxi, it’s ubiquitous).

Read Part One of this blog for more insights from Lorin Coles, CSAP, and see ASAP Media’s in-depth interviews with Coles and other out-of-the-box thinkers in the Q4 2017 issue of Strategic Alliance Magazine.

Tags:  alliances  Alliancesphere  BRIDGE  collaboration  critical partnering  ecosystems  Entrepreneurial Innovation  Gen X  incubator system  innovation hub  lifecycle  Lorin Coles  Millennials  Strategic Alliance Magazine  supply chain 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Millennials, Entrepreneurs, and the Push and Pull of the Crowd—an Interview with Lorin Coles (Part One)

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Friday, January 19, 2018

During a recent interview for the Q4 2017 Strategic Alliance Magazine, I spoke with Lorin Coles, CSAP, CEO and managing director of Alliancesphere, an alliance management and collaboration consulting business, on the topics of innovation, out-of-the-box thinking, and creativity in business partnering (see “Giving Birth to Innovation: The Brainchild of Out-of-the-Box Thinking Magazine”). Coles had many insightful and inspiring ideas on the topic, and due to limited space, some of these ideas didn’t make it into the magazine. Following is Part One of a two-part blog post based on additional materials from the interview.

The Cusp of Change
Coles: Today, it’s the most exciting time I’ve ever seen. Building the solutions and go-to-market has evolved because there are so many different routes to market to create that customer experience. So much has to do with digital technology—a lot of it is the leading edge. Also, crossing from the innovators to early adopters—we definitely have worked in many companies along that lifecycle. The market is at the point where they know how critical partnering, collaboration, and ecosystems are. Companies are all trying to figure out how to partner with tech companies in cross-industry partnering with three, four, five multiple companies at once to create a partnership.

The Influence of Gen X
The depth and breadth of partnering is so different, and I think we’re going to see a big change in the market: Clearly, the workplace is changing with millennials. They are moving up in the management structure, changing the makeup, and understand tech and partnering. People in their 40’s are now becoming leaders of companies. That group understands more intuitively. Another factor has to do with operating in a global landscape, where some cultures are more inherently collaborative. Also, the role of women in leadership—they are more open to collaboration. Finally, the Cloud—because of mobility and the Cloud and what is possible, tech is not sitting in the basement anymore. Uber, airbnb, artificial intelligence—all of these next-generation ideas are absolutely going to create business opportunities and a better world. 

Entrepreneurial Innovation
In 1999, I got involved with an organization in Atlanta—The American Israeli Chamber of Commerce. The Coca-Cola Company was looking to build joint, adjacent business models and innovation practices. We started working with the chief innovation officer across the brands, and we put together a trip to Israel. There were three core things Coca-Cola was trying to innovate around:

  • brands or products
  • capabilities: anything up and down that valley chain, such as technology, processes, ingredients, or science
  • packaging: an important part of fast-moving consumer goods companies

Before we went, we looked at four areas of innovation: Water, energy, ingredients, and the supply chain. I went to Coca-Cola before heading to Israel and gathered the problems and consumer and business challenges in those four areas.

Learn more about the story of Coca-Cola, Israel, and innovation in Part Two of this blog sharing more of ASAP Media’s conversation on out-of-the-box thinking with Lorin Coles, CSAP, CEO of Alliancesphere. 

Tags:  alliances  Alliancesphere  collaboration  critical partnering  ecosystems  Entrepreneurial Innovation  Gen X  lifecycle  Lorin Coles  Millennials  Strategic Alliance Magazine  supply chain 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 
Page 4 of 11
1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6  |  7  |  8  |  9  >   >>   >| 
For more information email us at info@strategic-alliances.org or call +1-781-562-1630