My Profile   |   Print Page   |   Contact Us   |   Sign In   |   Register
ASAP Blog
Blog Home All Blogs
Welcome to ASAP Blog, the best place to stay current regarding upcoming events, member companies, the latest trends, and leaders in the industry. Blogs are posted at least once a week; members may subscribe to receive notifications when new blogs are posted by clicking the "Subscribe" link above.

 

Search all posts for:   

 

Top tags: alliance management  collaboration  alliances  partnering  alliance  alliance managers  partners  alliance manager  partner  partnerships  ecosystem  The Rhythm of Business  governance  Jan Twombly  partnership  Strategic Alliance Magazine  Eli Lilly and Company  IoT  Vantage Partners  biopharma  Healthcare  NetApp  2015 ASAP Global Alliance Summit  ASAP BioPharma Conference  Cisco  IBM  innovation  strategy  Christine Carberry  communication 

Alex Dickinson, High-Tech and Biotech Executive and Co-Founder of Start-Up ChromaCode, To Keynote ASAP Global Alliance Summit Feb. 28 in San Diego

Posted By John W. DeWitt, Monday, February 20, 2017

The 2017 ASAP Global Alliance Summit will focus on partnering for profit, innovation, and value during a time when technology and clinical worlds are among the many industries and sectors colliding in new customer-driven partnerships; Dickinson will discuss complex partnering in “The New Convergence: Life Science + Tech + Government”

CANTON, MASS. (PRWEB) FEBRUARY 02, 2017

The Association of Strategic Alliance Professionals (ASAP), the world’s leading professional association dedicated to the practice of partnering, alliance management, and business collaboration, will be telescoping the necessary practices and tools for today’s rapidly growing cross-industry, cross-sector business ecosystems at the 2017 ASAP Global Alliance Summit “Profit, Innovation, and Value for the Partnering Enterprise,” Feb. 28-March 2 at the San Diego Marriott Mission Valley, San Diego, California.

“How to maximize profit and value during a time of complexity so heavily influenced by the evolving Internet of Things and multi-industry collaboration is a challenge companies wrestle with on a daily basis,” says Michael Leonetti, CSAP, president and CEO of ASAP. “Innovation is a key component in that equation for driving revenue streams. More than ever before, this year’s Summit will be providing the kinds of ideas, tools, and best practices partnership managers need to stay on the top of their game during a time of tremendous adjustment. ”

Center stage at the annual event will be keynote speaker Alex Dickinson, PhD, founder and executive chairperson for ChromaCode and recent senior vice president of strategic initiatives at the San Diego-based biotechnology company Illumina. Dr. Dickinson will talk about the new convergence of life science and technology and its impact on the applications and cloud computing practices for large-scale DNA sequencing and leveraging genomics data. In his talk “The New Convergence: Life Science + Tech + Government,” he will discuss his firsthand experience in shaping and connecting these realms, highlighting Illumina’s role as an industry leader in innovative collaboration in the complex world of genomics, and its applications in medical research, clinical testing, and therapy. The talk will focus on Dr. Dickinson’s experiences in driving advances in the evolving, multi-dimensional partnering world across multiple industries and the public sector. Click here to read the full press release.

Tags:  2017 ASAP Global Alliance Summit  Alex Dickinson  alliance  alliance management  ChromaCode  collaboration  genomics data  Illumina  multi-dimensional partnering  partnering 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

An Unambiguous Call to Action: Preview the Q1 2017 Strategic Alliance Magazine

Posted By John W. DeWitt, Saturday, February 11, 2017

From the cover to The Close, the Q1 2017 issue of Strategic Alliance Magazine tackles the critical topics that matter in today’s increasingly complex collaborations—and serves as a call to action for partnering executives to step out of their comfort zone, sound the call for professional alliance management, and continuously build their organizations’ capability to collaborate everywhere. For example, in our regular column “The Close,” I share a recent conversation with top Cisco executive and collaboration leader Ron Ricci. While “comfort with ambiguity” is an oft-cited trait of alliance executives, I argue (with support from Ron) that there’s nothing ambiguous about your CEO recognizing that digitization demands collaboration if your company is to succeed. Get a jump start reading this issue—full text of “The Close” follows below.

“THE CLOSE: An Unambiguous Call to Action,” from Q1 2017 Strategic Alliance Magazine

In Genevieve Fraser’s Q1 2017 Member Spotlight on Celgene, she and Jeremy Ahouse, CSAP, PhD, discuss how his alliance team includes “the kinds of people who can live with ambiguity and difference even as they get things done.” I’ve often heard comfort with ambiguity cited as an important trait of partnering executives. I got to thinking: Do I know any “ambiguous” alliance executives?

Most partnering professionals I know strike me as grounded, clear-as-a-bell communicators who don’t hesitate to share their point of view and who often can be very directive. I surmise that it’s precisely a lack of personal ambiguity that helps alliance execs lead amidst ambiguity. In a nutshell, it takes confidence to collaborate.

You feel that confidence within Ron Ricci, co-author of The Collaboration Imperative and a longtime Cisco senior executive focused on collaboration as an organizational capability, who joined a 90-minute conference call with ASAP’s advisory board in January. Ricci and Norma Watenpaugh, CSAP, principal of Phoenix Consulting Group, discussed the just-published ISO 44001, the International Standards Organization’s standard for “collaborative business relationship management systems.” (See in-depth coverage forthcoming in eSAM Plus, ASAP blogs, and future Strategic Alliance Magazine articles.) Ricci believes the ISO standard—which aligns to ASAP’s alliance management frameworks—will help propagate a common language for business collaboration, inside and among organizations. Ricci and the many leaders he interacts with see partnering and collaborative ability as central to grappling with the pace of a rapidly digitizing world.

“I spend all day long talking to senior executives of diverse governments and companies around the world about their collaboration opportunities,” says Ricci, vice president of customer experience services at Cisco, whom I spoke to recently. “Speed is the most important thing they need to move their businesses [according to] every leader I’ve met with over the last five years on this topic of collaboration. And companies see collaboration as the means to get speed.”

Talking to Ricci is an unambiguous look into how the C-suite views partnering and collaboration today—and the opportunity this represents for alliance management.

“Digitization and the ability to connect anything has taken the notion of speed and actually made it a potential carnivore of companies,” Ricci explains. “Take the technology trend of standardization and connect to the broader business trend of digitization—now we have a market moving almost at the pace of Moore’s Law. In 18 to 24 months the way you make money serving your customers can evolve. … So the way organizations collaborate and work together might need to be the most important capability they need to survive in the 21st century.”

This is an unmistakable call to action for all alliance professionals. It’s time to evangelize the value of this profession like never before. Recent ASAP, Vantage Partners, and other studies present unambiguous data on how professional alliance management drives success and financial performance of partnerships. As exemplified by our cover story, “The Partner-Everywhere Imperative: A Practitioner’s Guide,” and numerous sessions at ASAP conferences, the ASAP community is on the forefront of extending and adapting alliance management frameworks, practices, and tools to the new, increasingly complex collaborations that now proliferate across industries and sectors.

“How do you survive in a world where risk is growing faster than growth?” a Fortune 500 CEO recently asked Ricci. “You have to operate at an uncommon level of speed, adaptability, and flexibility,” Ricci responds. “And if there’s a better way to do that than collaboration, please tell me.”

And if there’s a better resource for collaboration success than your alliance team, the ASAP community, and the alliance management profession, please tell me.

Tags:  alliance executives  alliances  ASAP Conferences  Celgene  collaboration  C-suite  Fortune500  Jeremy Ahouse  Partner-Everywhere  Ron Ricci  Strategic Alliance Magazine  The Collaboration Imperative  Vantage Partners 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

‘Design in Pencil’ as You Integrate Change into the Design Thinking Process (Part Three): How Alliance Teams Build an Experience Map, Grapple with Challenges, and Iterate

Posted By Genevieve Fraser, Monday, October 3, 2016
Updated: Friday, September 30, 2016

As you work through the design thinking process and apply it to your partnerships, you are building techniques to reach a decision, and you are learning to work together. With an alliance team and two core partners, you can get at an aligned recommendation or proposal. The ideal is to brainstorm and map out the most efficient way partners can get to the most effective process to come to a proposal. Then bring the partners together and arrive at a decision. Instead of “You have your way and I have mine,” ask “What is the alliance way?”

Now participants in the “Using Design Thinking to Drive Speed, Innovation, and Alignment in Partnering” workshop are exploring how to build an experience map. At this point in the 90-minute interactive session at the Sept. 7-9, 2016 ASAP BioPharma Conference in Boston, ASAP board member Jan Twombly, CSAP, and her partner at The Rhythm of Business, Bentley University professor Jeff Shuman, Ph.D., CSAP, are leading breakout groups through the process, advising executives to:

  • Step back and focus on empathic needs using their emotional intelligence.
  • Define what the empathic needs are for the co-diagnostic partner.
  • Report back to the larger project team—scientists, governance bodies, and other stakeholders.
  • Brainstorm with the larger group in mind.
  • Accelerate the delivery process, and eliminate elements can slow the process down.
  • Separate decision making into a core group for brainstorming and a companion diagnostics partners group.
  • Question if either party has experience. If both or neither have experience, then negotiate.

It’s critically important for alliance managers to drive the process and ensure it’s actually happening. Establish a collaboration leadership team; compare the companions in a diagnostic space and find companion diagnostic partners. Define the objective of the proposal and components. Both parties should come up with a short list of partners. There should be a joint evaluation process before asking for project approval. Get feedback, and redesign the prototype loop. Bring leaders and managers together to do this. Obtain a joint alliance management agreement on a new design. Relaunch the collaboration, implement from both partners, and plan for a joint development.

  • Two groups should come together and define a shared problem or goal.
  • Identify the problems.
  • Bring back to the company collective and individual brainstorming and group feedback.
  • Finalize and propose to the steering committee.

Approach Issues with Partners—and Build Iteration into the Process

Implementation

There is a skill to defining assumptions that may turn out to be true, or not true. Engage people, and roll it out to create a social charter, and stick to it. When looking at the final piece—look to iterate. You may find you didn’t get the question right, or you may discover you didn’t understand and so-and-so needed to be brought into the process. Question: Are you delivering the design experience? Make sure you find measures that define it. Prior to the proposal being presented to governance, make sure everyone has bought in.

As part of the workshop, groups were formed and asked to identify three assumptions inherent in the process they designed. Additionally, they were asked to assess the following: What is the most critical assumption you have made, and if it’s wrong, what is the impact? 

Group responses:

  • People won’t be candid or transparent or participate in individual conversations.
  • The development team is vetting the plan properly, and it was checked for joint alignment.
  • Both teams want to work jointly and collaborate. Or do they think they know best?  
  • They assume the other company has experience, but they may not have the experience or data needed.
  • In the list of shared attributes, make sure the internal list matches up. If not, it won’t pass governance.
  • You don’t need hard data numbers to prove or disprove the assumption.

Final thoughts

ID assumptions.  Use iteration. Move forward and focus on the intended outcome.  Start the intended experience, and map backwards. All stakeholders must get their needs satisfied; if not, they will stick out their foot and stop the process. Give power to partners if you wish to engage in a productive and collaborative process.

Tags:  alliance managers  alliance teams  Bentley University  biopharma  collaboration  decision making  design thinking  healthcare  Jan Twombly  Jeff Shuman  leadership team  non-asset based alliances  partnering  partners  The Rhythm of Business 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

‘Design in Pencil’ as You Integrate Change into the Design Thinking Process (Part One): BioPharma Partnering Execs Explore How to ‘Get Smart Quickly’ and ‘Change as Needed’

Posted By Genevieve Fraser, Tuesday, September 13, 2016

Participants packed the “Using Design Thinking to Drive Speed, Innovation, and Alignment in Partnering” workshop at the Sept. 7-9, 2016 ASAP BioPharma Conference in Boston, diving into the 90-minute session to gain insight into design thinking as an innovative strategy that can be applied to alliance management.

Though design as a way of thinking in the sciences was explored as early as the late 1960s, the approach was expanded on by Rolf Faste at Stanford University in the 1980s and 90s. Design thinking was adapted for business purposes by Faste's Stanford colleague, David M. Kelley, who in 1991 founded IDEO, which focuses on a human-centered approach to innovative, problem-solving solutions.

Led by ASAP board member Jan Twombly, CSAP, and her partner at The Rhythm of Business, Bentley University professor, Jeff Shuman, Ph.D., CSAP, the interactive session drew from IDEO as well as an IBM model that can be adapted to help alliance management teams solve problems at the speed and scale today’s corporate world demands. The workshop was designed to provide participants with proven tools and techniques that can immediately be put to use to align operating processes—or to address any complex problem. 

“When you know what you need to learn, you can get smart quickly,” Twombly stated as she explained how the design thinking process defines the problem and then uses the basic framework to arrive at desired customer process and outcomes.  Implementation of the solution always involves the needs of the end user.  However, iteration, the repetition of a process, is key to assessing outcomes and implementing change. And the iterations change as you begin to think smarter, she said. 

“You need to identify assumptions, and then ID info that was derived from that assumption and decide if the assumption was good or bad. But do it in pencil,” Twombly warned the group. “Give yourselves the opportunity to change as needed. Take time out of the process to do this.”

Key points in assessing end user needs and gaining other stakeholders’ inputs:

  • Interview with empathy, put stakeholders at ease, talk to invoke stories, give examples, and be specific.
  • Question statements—repeat back what you’ve heard to arrive at “yes” in an agreement and move forward.
  • Look for inconsistency and for nonverbal cues, such as, hesitation in a voice and areas that need to be worked through.
  • Do not ask leading questions and don’t give them the answers—let them come up with the truth of how they think and feel.
  • Find ways to work so you can be more efficient and effective.

Twombly cautioned that when working in tandem with another group, act as a joint think tank where you both develop a concept and don’t develop competing concepts in isolation and then fight over them. Think of how others might feel if the proposal they worked on, on their own, was roundly rejected. She then asked the participants grouped by tables to develop three questions that need to be asked of team member. 

At this point in the workshop, Shuman began to actively work with the groups. The questions needed to look at “what we’ve experienced that gets at what was wrong with the process.” The purpose of the questions is to generate design strategy from design thinking. Questions developed by the groups included:

  • What is frustrating about the ways we collaborate?
  • What is the value of meetings?
  • What about this process keeps you up at night?
  • What do you think is working about the collaboration?  What isn’t working?
  • How do you feel the meeting is going?  Be candid.
  • What defines a great collaboration meeting?  What does it accomplish?

“Use the questioning process to see what matters and then base your design on it,” Twombly said. “Ask why and how. It’s always good to gather data in pairs. One asks questions and one captures data. Order the answers in a series of needs statements, as in: 

Question: Why do we need more efficient acceleration?

Answer: We need greater efficiency to drive the agenda, to get the product to the customer.

Question:  If that is why, then how do we get there? 

Stay tuned to the ASAP Blog for Part Two of our coverage of Twombly and Shuman’s design thinking workshop, as well as continued blog posts about other informative and provocative sessions that ASAP Media team covered during last week’s 2016 ASAP BioPharma Conference at the Revere Hotel Boston Common. 

Tags:  alliance management  Bentley University  collaboration  customer  David M. Kelley  design thinking  IBM  IDEO  innovative strategy  Jan Twombly  Jeff Shuman  problem-solving solutions  Rolf Faste  stakeholders  Stanford University  The Rhythm of Business 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Ben Gomes-Casseres and the Bayer Team Return to the 2016 ASAP BioPharma Conference with an Interactive Roundtable on Creating Alliance Success

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Tuesday, September 6, 2016

One session at last year’s ASAP BioPharma Conference was such a success that Ben Gomes-Casseres, CSAP, DBA, and the Bayer HealthCare team are returning with the same theme in a new interactive roundtable format. Their deep dive on “Making Better Alliances: How Alliance Management, Business Development, and Legal Can Collaborate More Effectively” will delve into how to successful integrate alliance management, business development, and the legal division to improve alliance success rates.  They return to the stage for this year’s ASAP BioPharma Conference Sept. 7-9 “New Faces, Unexpected Places in Partnering: The Foresight to Lead, the Foundation to Succeed” at the Revere Hotel, Boston Common, Boston.

 

An alliance strategy consultant, professor at Brandeis University in Waltham, Mass., and author, Gomes-Casseres will be moderating the session with Bayer award-winning cross-functional team of John A. Calvo, Karen Denton, CA-AM, and Claudia Karnbach problem-solving an alliance management case. Attendees will be participants, too, tackling tricky alliance scenarios with best practices through dynamic peer-to-peer exchanges. I asked Gomes-Casseres a few questions about the impetus for the session.

 

What are the most common reasons for the high failure rate of alliances?

As a community, we have made great strides in alliance management, but we have been myopic. We need to broaden our view so that we can see more clearly the faults in alliance strategy and design that frequently lead to dissolution.

The reason half of all alliances fail can be largely attributed to poor up-front design, which includes: 

  • Choosing the wrong partner
  • Deciding to partner for the wrong reasons
  • Flawed contract terms

Part of the problem is that alliance management is left out of the early decision process. Part of it also is that alliance management, business development, and legal speak different languages and concerns. Making a robust alliance requires effective collaboration between business development, legal, and alliance management. However, this aspect of internal collaboration often receives less attention from alliance managers than the work they perform after the deal is “done.” That’s one component in critical need of change to improve the success rate.

What solutions will you and the Bayer panel be recommending in your session? 

At the 2015 BioPharma Conference last year, I held a session with Bayer Healthcare executives from alliance management, business development, and the legal division that focused on four areas: 

  • How Bayer’s does the “Deal to Alliance” process, which is a way of describing how to pay attention to both alliance strategy and management
  • The importance of involving alliance management early on in the deal
  • The contributions alliance management makes to negotiation and contract terms
  • How combining these elements builds more robust alliances

This year, I invited the same team that provided a session at the BioPharma Conference last year to come back and work in an interactive continuation of that session with participants. We plan to quickly rehash what was covered last year and then do a deep dive into fresh and innovative approaches. We plan to share a case study and explore in open discussion how to solve it. In the process, participants will learn how alliance management can contribute to business development and contracting and the best way to bring the D2A process back to their own companies.

 What is your goal of the session for participants?

 The goal is simple but essential to having a solid alliance. We want to:

  • Make more robust and quicker alliances
  • Resolve the differences of perspective among functions in alliance design
  • Broaden the role of alliance management in the organization

How does your new book Remix Strategy: The Three Laws of Business Combinations, published by Harvard Business Review Press, promote some of these ideas?

 Remix Strategy provides the tools to fix this problem. The solution lies in designing alliances so that they can be governed effectively to create value. I call it the “Deal to Alliance” process, which means paying attention to both alliance strategy and management. For a healthy alliance, it’s critical to integrate the process of designing and implementing alliances along their full lifecycle.

Tags:  alliance management  alliances  ASAP BioPharma Conference  Bayer HealthCare  Ben Gomes-Casseres  business development  Claudia Karnbach  collaboration  John A. Calvo  Karen Denton  Keywords: Remix Strategy  management  patner  strategy 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 
Page 7 of 10
1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6  |  7  |  8  |  9  |  10
For more information email us at info@strategic-alliances.org or call +1-781-562-1630