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On the Eve of Disruption: Summit Keynote Will Explore How Digital Transformation Affects Nearly Every Industry

Posted By Michael J. Burke, Tuesday, April 7, 2020

“Disruption,” in addition to being a much-used term in the business press, is a two-edged sword: an exciting prospect if you’re the one doing the disrupting; not so much if your company or industry finds itself being disrupted and forced to scramble and adapt. Some disruptions may be temporary—as, we fervently hope, will be those spawned by COVID-19—while others are likely here to stay.

It’s these more lasting and far-reaching effects that will be the subject of a keynote address at the ASAP Global Alliance Summit, now scheduled for late June, to be given by Steve Steinhilber, global vice president of ecosystems and business development at Equinix. The presentation, titled “Creating Alliances and Digital Ecosystem Capabilities in an Increasingly Platform Enabled and Interconnected World,” will examine how the speed and scale of information technology growth and new global platforms will enable—and even necessitate—the digital transformation of nearly all businesses, creating many new business models in the process.

According to Steinhilber, the speed and rate of disruption varies by industry, but many existing value chains are already under significant disruptive threat. Industries that are “content sensitive or highly inefficient value chains” have already experienced this disruption, he said, as whole segments of the value chain have been eliminated. These industries include advertising, newspapers, movies, and retail, as well as the travel industry, including hotel bookings and other reservations services.

Others are either just starting out on this journey or find themselves somewhere in the middle. Steinhilber cited the automotive and transportation services industries as examples of verticals that are just beginning to experience the waves of change, while “all layers of the IT industry and also the satellite launch industry” are in the midst of ongoing disruption.

According to an IDC survey, by 2022—less than two years away—at least 60 percent of global GDP will be digitized, with growth in every industry driven by digitally enhanced offerings, operations, and relationships. And according to McKinsey, digital ecosystems will account for more than $60 trillion in revenue by 2025, or more than 30 percent of global corporate revenue. As we’ve seen—and if you haven’t already, check out our cover story on ecosystems in the Q1 2020 issue of Strategic Alliance Quarterly for more on this trend—these disruptive forces are enabled by an explosion of information technology delivered via platform-enabled companies monetized by new business models. These platform models are proving to be much more profitable than product pipeline business models, and also offer accelerated time to market for new products and services and create new ways to share the wealth. This has directly translated into massive growth in platform companies’ market capitalizations.

These new ecosystem- and platform-based models have significant implications for how partnering frameworks and practices are changing, said Steinhilber, requiring “a blend of both strategic, high-touch partner management as well as low-touch engagement via new tools and systems.” And as organizations as a whole struggle to adjust and adapt, today’s—and tomorrow’s—alliance and partnering professionals will need to change their ways, too.

“They’ll still need conventional strategic alliance skills in order to manage complex, highly strategic relationships,” Steinhilber said. “But they’ll also need to have the ability to build programmatic models to engage companies that are wanting to innovate on top of the platform. This means implementing new financial models such as revenue sharing, deploying tools to automate partner engagement and management, developing dashboards that can manage rapid scaling, and being able to ensure the quality of what partners are offering on your platform.”

Curious to learn more? Me too! Stay tuned for more information on this and other outstanding presentations to be offered at the upcoming ASAP Global Alliance Summit. 

Tags:  alliance  digital ecosystems  Digital Transformation  disruptive  ecosystem  engagement  Equinix  frameworks  IDC  IT industry  McKinsey  partner  partnering professionals  platform-based models  satellite launch industry  Steve Steinhilber  strategic relationships  value chains 

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Closing the C-Suite's Collaboration Gap

Posted By Contributed by Jan Twombly, CSAP & Jeff Shuman, CSAP, PhD | The Rhythm of Business, Thursday, January 24, 2019

Earlier this month, we presented and recorded a webinar to expand upon our mini e-book that we wrote together with our partner Alliancesphere, Own Your Transformation: A Five-Point Agenda for Creating Your Organization’s Collaborative Leadership System. The key message of the presentation is to urge alliance professionals to take charge of closing the gap between the happy talk about the importance of partnering and the actual ability of organizations to collaborate and partner well in a digital world.

Yes, this is our soap box and it has been for many years. The difference today is all the data reporting C-Suite executives really do believe partnering is important and a core pillar of their growth and transformation strategies. They also think their organizations collaborate and partner effectively. Their employees disagree. Take a look at some data from a recent Capgemini study.[1]   

We’ve witnessed this gap in our work for years and years. For example, in a recent project assessing the current state of an alliance management practice and charting a course for its future, a senior executive told us how important alliances were to the future of the business. We then interviewed one of his senior people ostensibly responsible for an important partner. He told us he’d had only a one-hour call to familiarize himself with the role of an alliance director. No surprise, he didn’t think this was sufficient to allow him to be successful in the role. This may be an extreme case, but it illustrates the gap that exists between the belief that alliances and partnering are critical for growth and the failure to recognize that a system of collaborative leadership must become part of the organization’s culture and operating norms. It is an Achille’s heel of business transformation.

Here’s another example: A company that is remaking themselves to focus strictly on downstream go-to-market activities has outsourced all upstream research and development capabilities except project management to oversee the outsourced service providers. Outsourcing a capability is not about managing a series of projects. It is engaging with third parties to build collaborative relationships that leverage the resources of each party for mutual benefit—to achieve a synergistic relationship where 1+1>3. In other words, the reason for—the essence of— partnership.  

During the webinar, we discussed our five-point agenda for creating a collaborative leadership system that starts with owning your own transformation. You can’t expect to drive change in your organization without demonstrating how you’re changing. Every alliance professional has something in their job description and potentially in their goals and accountabilities, to “create an environment for collaboration with alliance partners,” or something similar. Specifically executing on this piece of the job has always taken a back seat to immediate revenue generation or ensuring a co-development project happens smoothly. No longer. Today—when partnering everywhere in an organization is the recipe for growth—creating that environment becomes an essential part of the job. The collaborative leadership system—the mechanism through which leadership is exercised—is what enables it.

Closing the gap between the partnering and collaboration capability CEOs think their companies have and what they actually have is essential to the digital business transformation powering growth for legacy companies and a core capability for entrepreneurial ventures. Alliance professionals are typically part of the powerful middle of the organization—the Rosetta Stone of the organization—translating senior leadership directives into operational objectives and understanding from the field and other customer-facing personnel the successes and challenges at an execution level, scaling or adjusting accordingly.  Who other than alliance professionals should be leading the charge to close the gap between what CEOs think about their organization’s ability to collaborate and the reality?

[1] Capgemini Digital Transformation Institute, “The Digital Culture Challenge: Closing the Employee-Leadership Gap,” 2018 

Tags:  alliance management  collaboration  collaborative leadership system  digital culture  digital transformation  Jan Twombly  Jeff Shuman  partnering  The Rhythm of Business 

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The Value of Honing in on Partner Specialization and Expertise—the Google Way

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Wednesday, October 17, 2018
Updated: Wednesday, October 17, 2018

Google has been called a trendsetter; a more apt description might be “epoch-maker.” The company repeatedly has surged ahead of the pack to set long-term standards. When adapting to the evolving multi-industry, multi-partner ecosystem, Google places great value on making specialization and expertise central to strategy, says Nina Harding, channel chief at Google Cloud. Harding discussed that message today in her session “Transforming Partnerships in the Cloud” at the 2018 ASAP Tech Partner Forum, “Reimaging Part­nering in a Disruptive World,” on October 17, at the Four Points by Sheraton, San Jose Airport, San Jose, California. In a fascinating pre-Forum interview, here’s what Harding honed in on:

Your session description describes Google’s link to transformation as pervasive in a world of continuous change. How does this philosophy fit into Google’s present partnering mindset?

We partner differently. We approach partnering much more from the ways companies and partners are transforming. I plan to talk a lot about traditional services and resellersthe way partners build their businesses. That traditional way is in the rear view mirror. We are finding increasingly the need to build businesses around where they have expertise, so it makes it easier to partner to fill in gaps. We ask the question: What do you want the ecosystem to do for you, and how do you want it to extend value for you? We look at channels differently as we meet with partners and look at the marketplace. Those traditional partners don’t exist anymore. They don’t show up as one type or two types anymore.

The shift from vendor to ecosystem partner requires figuring out for a particular company how they can best ride their business. You need to look at it more from a behavioral perspective: How can we make you successful or profitable? Or if you want to just sell, how can we unbridle you from the resell? Become strategic advisors if you don’t want to be bridled into reselling. We talk about transforming and looking at the landscape of the ecosystem and how they want to engage with us. It’s a very different approach. Companies like Google, SAP, and Microsoft used to have a lot of power in who their partners were. Now, with social media, purchasing is through networks. Our job is not to assess the value of a partner. Instead, it’s to differentiate the business. There is a fundamental shift in the way you want to engage and work with our ecosystem. We talk a lot more now about how we help partners differentiate in the marketplace and how we make them successful. Because we created a culture, we ask questions like: How do we find the right partner? How are they specialized? What is their expertise?

As one of the big leaders in this new ecosystem, how is Google adapting and adjusting to the change?

It’s critical. One of the biggest areas of investment in the last six months requires really focusing on industry perspective. For example, some of our great new partners and customers are makers of wearable devices, where they have the Google Cloud platform. This is not the traditional cloudwe take geospatial data, maps, linguistics, etc., and intertwine them. The power of having such tools and resources through Google partnering is to be able to deliver transformative options in, for example, the healthcare space. We also have Chrome. The utilitarian nature of a Chrome book allows hospitals and organizations to have a utility laptop that anyone can access. They can sign into their account regardless of it being their machinebecause everything is in the cloud. It’s not just signing into an epic system; it’s anything and everything they have access to as a user, from the G-suite to GCP, Chrome, maps. There’s a tower of solutions as a partner.

You state that companies need to become business advisors solving customer challenges in an agile, customer-centric, digital environment. Why is that the new normal?

Customers are almost ahead of partners sometimes in digital transformation, as partners are no longer going in to solve a lift-and-shift problem. Whole conversations need to be about imagining what your business could be and tackling what your next version of your business will be. It’s about transforming your businesshow to reach and serve your customer versus going in and saying “This is our tech, and this is how this will fit.” That’s the conversation we’re having about being that trusted advisor.

What are key considerations when building these new partnering programs?

I don’t think the partner program are vendor-driven, they are ecosystem-driven. So when building programs, build to make the partner successful. Build their business. In this world, it’s about innovation, digital transformation, and the need to infuse with tech enablement, but also it about how to think differently and imagine a different world than we have today. It’s a different way to enable partners. It doesn’t mean anything to a customer if you are a silver, bronze, or gold partner. But it means something if I have specialization or expertise to give you an idea of where you need to take your business. It’s about serving your ecosystem rather than measuring your ecosystem. My message is more about how should companies should be thinking differently working with their partners. Look at this from a different perspective and be customer-centric, which is a different philosophy.

Stay tuned for more of the ASAP Media team’s coverage of the 2018 ASAP Tech Partner Forum on the ASAP Blog at www.strategic-alliances.org. Learn more about the 2018 ASAP Tech Partner Forum at http://asaptechforum.org

Tags:  ASAP Tech Partner Forum  Chrome  cloud  customer-centric  digital Transformation  geospatial data  Google Cloud  innovation  Microsoft  multi-partner ecosystem  Nina Harding  partner programs  partners  SAP  strategic advisors 

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Increasing Strength through P2P Muscle Building (Part 2): Cisco and SMART Partnering Execs Delve into the ‘Value Exchange Challenge’ at 2018 ASAP Tech Partner Forum

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Monday, October 15, 2018

2x, 5x, 10x. How can companies gain extra oomph and advantage in the emerging multi-partner, multi-industry ecosystem? That’s the central theme of the session “Value Exchange Challenge: Building the New P2P Ecosystem Partnering Muscle” being offered at the 2018 ASAP Tech Partner Forum, “Reimaging Part­nering in a Disruptive World,” on October 17 at the Four Points by Sheraton, San Jose Airport, San Jose, California. The session will be presented by two speakers: Lorin Coles, CSAP, CEO, Alliancesphere, and principal, SMART Partnering; Kashif Abbasi, senior director, partner sales acceleration, global partner organization, Cisco Systems, Inc. I had the pleasure recently of talking at length with Coles, an animated and crisp speaker, about the driving force behind the session and the accompanying Cisco case study. Part two of our discussion follows.

ASAP Media: How does Cisco Systems enter into this value exchange equation as a case study?

We will lay out an example to understand the transformation Cisco is going through according to customer needs. Their new market model is built around new consumption and outcome-based models that go to market. At Cisco, they had to go beyond selling recurring software. It was no longer about landing the deal. It was about consumption and adoption in the entire customer lifecycle, and adoption to expansion to renewal. What they had to realize was that they had to help orchestrate the ecosystem and scale out this capability. They needed a scaling engine where they had different programs, different pipelines of enablement, automation, and sales acceleration. One of their areas of sales acceleration that is co-delivered with Alliancesphere is called ACES, which stands for Accelerating Cisco Ecosystem Sales, to take the complexity out and accelerate muscle building. ACES@Scale co-develops this methodology for its use partnerships and a framework to accelerate multiparty solution sales. It’s a proven methodology to sell Cisco architecture through 100% ready solutions with a faster time to booking. The key is bringing packaged solutions to market for their channelmulti-partner solutions all the way to resellers.

What else will you be covering in this session?

We will close it off by talking about the future of co-selling, which is all around the customer, the buyers, and the solutions. And it’s really about empowering the partners to exchange value from both the buyer and seller journey to help all parties realize the desired business outcomes. We will provide point of view on complexity of solutions versus buyer dynamics. Based on different co-selling scenarios, we will determine the best way to work with your partners. It’s a muscle that needs developing at all levels of organizations: from the executive team to management to the frontline - not just the sellers or tech team. The whole organization has to begin to work and operate differently.

What is driving the change, this need for a P2P muscle-building approach?

The change in the market and what customers are looking for: real solutions to solve problems in more proactive ways that eliminate the friction and focus on their needs and deliver to their outcomes. This kind of capability muscle is incremental. Building out the muscle and muscle memory becomes more effective the more you do itit gets stronger and stronger. It will become the core to the future of business. We’re going to look at it from a market and customer view, what it could mean to the audience, and then open it up to a Q&A session.

See part one of this blog and follow the ASAP Media team’s ongoing coverage of the October 17, 2018 ASAP Tech Partner Forum on the ASAP Blog at www.strategic-alliances.org.  Learn more and register for the ASAP Tech Forum at http://asaptechforum.org

Tags:  Alliancesphere  Cisco Systems  cross-functional  digital transformation  enablement  engagement  execution  Kashif Abbasi  Lorin Coles  P2P  partner  partnering  SMART Partnering  The Rhythm of Business  value creation 

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Increasing Strength through P2P Muscle Building (Part 1): Cisco and SMART Partnering Execs Delve into the ‘Value Exchange Challenge’ at 2018 ASAP Tech Partner Forum

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Thursday, October 11, 2018

2x, 5x, 10x. How can companies gain extra oomph and advantage in the emerging multi-partner, multi-industry ecosystem? That’s the central theme of the session “Value Exchange Challenge: Building the New P2P Ecosystem Partnering Muscle” being offered at the 2018 ASAP Tech Partner Forum, “Reimaging Part­nering in a Disruptive World,” on October 17 at the Four Points by Sheraton, San Jose Airport, San Jose, California. The session will be presented by two speakers: Lorin Coles, CSAP, CEO, Alliancesphere, and principal, SMART Partnering; Kashif Abbasi, senior director, partner sales acceleration, global partner organization, Cisco Systems, Inc. I had the pleasure recently of talking at length with Coles, an animated and crisp speaker, about the driving force behind the session and the accompanying Cisco case study. Part one  of our discussion follows.

ASAP Media: Why is value so central to your presentation?

Lorin Coles: The core of all partnering and partnerships is really about value and trust. When two companies come together, they are looking for where and how they can help each other create greater value for the customer. That’s a value exchangeit occurs at multiple levels with multiple people in alliances. Partnerships in the past had specific way that they did it. Now, because of digital transformation and the speed, scale, and scope of change, it’s more complex than ever to create contextually relevant value for your partners and customers because there are new buyers, and the solutions are more complex. If there is no value, it’s difficult to partner. Value is the cornerstone in everything we do. The value exchange is where and how we are going to partner together.

How can companies build Partner-to-Partner (P2P) ecosystem partnering muscle?

Partnering evolves over time just like sports evolves over time. You need to go from enablement to engagement to execution. You do that by working cross-functionally at multiple levels with companies.

It’s important to understand the different personalities of your partner and the audience, the difference between partner types, and the functionthe marketing, sales, and product people and the roles they play in the partnership. And more importantly than ever, you need to understand the value exchange.

Building that new muscle is something a lot of people can’t do because it takes connecting dots that others don’t see. It’s important to determine if you are a novice, intermediate, advanced, or expert when building up this muscle. Companies are becoming more and more dependent on partnering and need to learn how to partner in more proactive ways than before. They need to understand when and where to bring in partners, how to leverage partners. The process is different than before because it’s across an ecosystem.

How does Cisco Systems enter into this value exchange equation as a case study?

We will lay out an example to understand the transformation Cisco is going through according to customer needs.

See the remainder of our discussion with Lorin Coles in part two of this article and follow the ASAP Media team’s ongoing coverage of the 2018 ASAP Tech Partner Forum on the ASAP Blog at www.strategic-alliances.org. Learn more and register for the 2018 ASAP Tech Partner Forum at http://asaptechforum.org

Tags:  Alliancesphere  Cisco Systems  cross-functional  digital transformation  enablement  engagement  execution  Kashif Abbasi  Lorin Coles  P2P  partner  partnering  SMART Partnering  The Rhythm of Business  value creation 

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