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‘Like Putting Together a Puzzle’: IBM Execs Tackle Cyber Security Concerns of Multi-Party Alliances in 2018 ASAP Tech Partner Forum Keynote

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Friday, November 2, 2018
Updated: Wednesday, October 31, 2018

Threat factors are a growing concern for alliance managers coordinating multi-party, multi-industry collaborations. They need to consider the potential new channels created by their complexity, such as shared information and data. That message was woven into the keynote address “Cyber Security Ecosystem Meets the Customer Experience” presented by Mitch Mayne, public information officer at IBM, and Wendi Whitmore, global lead for IBM’s X-Force Incident Response and Intelligence Services (IRIS), at the 2018 ASAP Tech Partner Forum, “Reimaging Part­nering in a Disruptive World,” on October 17, at the Four Points by Sheraton, San Jose Airport, San Jose, California.

IBM has streamlined two separate cyber security response teams: one that deals with major security breaches and another that focuses on threat intelligence, detection, and response. The teams are oriented toward both internal and external communications in the event of a major pandemic cyber attack, the speakers explained. IBM is partnering extensively with more than 200 companies on cyber security response “through shared relationships with private and public companies,” explained Mayne. “Cyber security is a lot like putting together a puzzle. No one team has all the pieces. Our system helps us better protect clients and ourselves, and increases the speed of response.”

He then introduced IBM’s Cyber Range, an immersive, lifelike environment, based in Cambridge, Massachusetts, for simulating a breach. The Cyber Range teaches about appropriate, timely responsiveness by taking attendees through an actual breach that includes answering multiple ringing phone calls from the press and FBI. The program drives home the importance of having an integrated plan and a responsive, educated company culture.

The hand’s on teaching tool includes actual technology that “responders would be using. What the range is really fast at is increasing communications and awareness between groups,” Whitmore said.

Best practices are shared between teams, such as coordinating the split-second communication needs of executives with the slower pace of tech teams, which must compile and analyze large volumes of data. For example, the C-suite needs to understand why it could take four hours or even three days to assess data, she explained further. “It really increases perspective, and we have seen organizations really transformed by the process.”

It’s about building a cyber security culture within the company, Mayne added. Additionally, the Cyber Range instructs on the dos and don’ts of how and what to communicate to the press, clients, and internally: “How do you manage them during a breach?” He then provided some tips:

  • Have a holding statement prepared in advance that could cover a variety of incidents and you can release at a moment’s notice.
  • Let employees know ahead of time what is acceptable to say and do.
  • Do not speculate: Release only factual information and shows you have command of the situation.

In October, IBM plans to unveil the next level of the Cyber Range.  The Mobile Range will visit the National Mall in Washington, D.C., universities on the US east coast, and Europe in January.

During the Q&A session, an attendee described having just signed a multi-party contract with extensive language on cyber security response responsibilities.

“You have to ask your partners, ‘Do you have a plan in place if something like this were to happen?’” Mayne replied.

In another question, someone pointed out that compartmentalization helps with security, but then asked, “How do we partner and make sure these things are worked through?”

“Compartmentalization has created a lot of the problem,” replied Whitmore. “The more you can have increased communication between the stakeholders, the better your chance that you can quickly work through these scenarios.”

See more of the ASAP Media team’s coverage of the 2018 ASAP Tech Partner Forum on the ASAP Blog at www.strategic-alliances.org. Learn more about the 2018 ASAP Tech Partner Forum at http://asaptechforum.org

Tags:  2018 ASAP Tech Partner Forum  Channels  communication  Customer Experience Mitch Mayne  Cyber Security  Disruptive World  Ecosystem  IBM  IRIS  Mobile Range  partner  partnering  shared information and data  stakeholders  Wendi Whitmore  X-Force Incident Response and Intelligence Service 

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The Rugged Biopharma/Tech Topography—What Alliance Managers Need to Know (Part 2)

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Wednesday, October 24, 2018
Updated: Tuesday, October 23, 2018

This extremely well-organized session, “Non-traditional Partnerships:  The Changing BioPharma Alliance Landscape and the Implications for the Alliance Professional and Alliance Management Community” held by Stu Kliman and Ben Siddall of Cambridge-based Vantage Partners, started off by outlining the multiple challenges the biopharma industry faces today, many of which are financial. One major solution to those challenges lies in building more relationships across the lifecycle, specifically with tech, the pair pointed out. They described the complex ecosystem of partnerships that are emerging today and how to determine if it’s right for your company to jump into the trend and/or continue to engage in multi-partner collaborations. Also on the docket was a discussion on effective partnering, which requires the capability to make good choices and the ability to execute.

All major biopharma companies are following the route of building a greater partnering base, they explained. Some of the deals are very large—in the hundreds of millions. Some involve very big players that are exploring and investing in the digital health tech space, such as Apple and IBM. Some are much smaller, or combine large and small companies. No matter the size of the companies involved, when entering the field, “You need to be purposeful and execute quickly,” explained Siddall.

And you need to consider “What makes relationships work—what are the leverage points?” added Kliman.  “As we think about this new landscape of partnering, we are already seeing our clients making mistakes.”

One of the really important areas where companies are struggling in this ecosystem is the process of thinking through whether they should be partnering at all. “Should we just have a vendor relationship? What does partnership mean? Through what process are we making that decision? Where does partnering make sense?” said Kliman, ticking off the kinds of questions that naturally emerge.

“To achieve maximum value, biopharmas must select the right partners to address specific needs and manage these relationships in a way that acknowledges these differences,” Kliman emphasizes. It’s very important in the process to consider the differences between pharma and tech, he said, while flashing a slide.

The pharma cycle has:

  • High levels of regulation
  • Very long (five-plus years) “product” development
  • Management and investors familiar with longer development
  • Purposeful and predictable innovation and co-creation
  • Strong functional stakeholders (medical, legal, compliance, finance)
  • Contractual, asset-based alliances with fixed lengths
  • Well-defined commercial negotiation models with “customers” with significant regulation

The tech cycle has:

  • Variability—many markets are not regulated
  • Short to moderate (1-3 years) “product” development
  • Management/investors who tend to expect quick ROI and steady growth
  • Rapid and agile innovation and co-creation
  • Moderate or weak functional stakeholders (legal, compliance, finance)
  • A blend of formal/informal alliances, often with no fixed length
  • Flexible, market-driven customer engagement processes

Also of great importance is the process of thinking through the best possible partner choices and evaluating them according to the meta-criteria of capabilities. Both presenters recommend considering the marketplace and size of the deals and evaluating potential partners from multiple dimensions that go beyond just the financial impact. Vantage recommends doing this with a four-quadrant methodology that analyzes strategic, financial, operational, and relational fits.

“On the back end, we have challenges during execution to consider,” Kliman added. “Pharma and IT are significantly different. If your core expertise is to identify and manage alliance models that manage different partners, that needs to be brought into upstream activities as well.”

“If you are going to enter into this new world, you want to make sure the relationship is purposeful,” Kliman added. A purposeful relationship contains the following criteria, he said. It should be:

  • Purposeful (focused on a well-defined market; meets patient, partner, and company needs)
  • Choiceful (partnership is worth the effort; has the right answer, among other things)
  •  Designed and developed collaboratively (based on a shared vision; focused on joint gain, among other things)
  • Actively managed (with joint oversight; systems reviews; robust metrics)
  • Building over time
  • Assessed

See part one of this session coverage blog and stay tuned for more ASAP Media team coverage from the 2018 ASAP BioPharma Conference. 

Tags:  alliance  Ben Siddall  healthcare landscape  licensing-type alliance groups  partnering  pharma  Stu Kliman  tech  Vantage Partners 

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Rethinking Trust, Reshaping Industries: The Alliance Implications of Blockchain Technology as Seen Through the Eyes of IBM and ChromaWay

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson , Tuesday, October 16, 2018

IBM’s blockchain ledger solution has been gaining ground over the past year through extensive partnering. Much like a team sport, “the only way blockchain works is by participants in an ecosystem working together,” says Janine Grasso, vice president, blockchain strategy and ecosystem development, IBM Industry Platforms. Grasso was interviewed early in the year about blockchain technology for the Q1 2018 Strategic Alliance Magazine in the article “’An Exponential Adoption Curve’: The Changing Face of Data Security in Partnering”. When the article was first published, IBM had 40 to 50 active blockchain networks. That number has increased to 75 live networks solving industry-wide blockchain problems. Grasso will be discussing the implications of blockchain technology with co-speaker Todd Miller, CA-AM, vice president, US business development, ChromaWay, in the session “Rethinking Trust on the Blockchain: Partnering and Alliance Implications” at the 2018 ASAP Tech Partner Forum, “Reimaging Part­nering in a Disruptive World,” on October 17, at the Four Points by Sheraton, San Jose Airport, San Jose, California. In a recent interview, I asked Grasso about the core of the upcoming session.

ASAP Media: You are presenting with Todd Miller. What do the two of you plan to focus on?

Janine Grasso: We come from two very different perspectives. But we agree on how much blockchain will change all industriesand not just the ones most talked about, such as finance and supply chain. We’re both asking: “What role can we play to help partners do that?” We’re both trying to equip alliance managers and partners. This session is not just about reselling technology. It’s about applying tech across all industries; bringing together players that traditionally compete. We will go through our different backgrounds and points of view. We’ll discuss the problems around this new era and the world as it is today with blockchainthe same old problems that are slowing [the progress of] blockchain down, such as lack of trust, data disruption, and business disruption. And competitorsone start-up, like Über, can completely change the game in an industry.

Being able to leverage this new tech to reshape your industry is the punch line. We’ll go into what blockchain does and the capabilities of blockchain. We will round off the conversation with real-life examples and a discussion on how, exactly, companies across many different industries are applying the technology. How they also are breaking down the barriers that have existed for hundreds of years. And we’ll discuss music and royalty rights, talk about identity, food safety and the IBM Food Trust solution, and then go into the role of the alliance manager and how they can facilitate blockchain options.

So there are strong alliance implications with blockchain?

The true design of blockchain is the industry players or ecosystem coming together and bringing it to life. Blockchain is not singular. The only way it works is with participants in an ecosystem working together, so it’s very much a team sport.

The session description states you will cover technologies that “facilitate decentralized data sharing and secure transactions [that] will accelerate new business models beyond even Über, Spotify, and Airbnb.” Can your provide an example of a new business model?

Blockchain ingrains the trust in every transaction along its journey. In the case of a farmer and a distributor, it becomes transparent exactly where the food item came from: the genesis, authenticity of that product, and exposure to any contamination. The data explosion will continue and remain because of your digital ecosystem, and everything has that digital footprint now. You can encrypt information by attaching it in a blockchain. You only have to take elements that are necessary. That alleviates concerns around datait gives the security and data protection required and only uses crucial data in the blockchain. One example of a new business model is with Everledger, which uses blockchain in the diamond industry. There is traditionally a lack of trust and authenticity about where diamonds come from. Blockchain can now provide that information and verify its authenticity.

What is the No. 1 question you expect to hear in the Q&A session?

How do I get started? How can IBM help small and large companies convene a network because of its large ecosystem and client base? How do I participate? I suspect we will hear a lot of question about alliance management.  

Stay tuned for more of the ASAP Media team’s coverage of the 2018 ASAP Tech Partner Forum on the ASAP Blog at www.strategic-alliances.org. Learn more and register for the 2018 ASAP Tech Partner Forum at http://asaptechforum.org

Tags:  Alliance  alliance management  Blockchain  ChromaWay  data protection  Data Security  ecosystem  encrypt information  IBM  Janine Grasso  Partnering  Todd Miller 

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Increasing Strength through P2P Muscle Building (Part 2): Cisco and SMART Partnering Execs Delve into the ‘Value Exchange Challenge’ at 2018 ASAP Tech Partner Forum

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Monday, October 15, 2018

2x, 5x, 10x. How can companies gain extra oomph and advantage in the emerging multi-partner, multi-industry ecosystem? That’s the central theme of the session “Value Exchange Challenge: Building the New P2P Ecosystem Partnering Muscle” being offered at the 2018 ASAP Tech Partner Forum, “Reimaging Part­nering in a Disruptive World,” on October 17 at the Four Points by Sheraton, San Jose Airport, San Jose, California. The session will be presented by two speakers: Lorin Coles, CSAP, CEO, Alliancesphere, and principal, SMART Partnering; Kashif Abbasi, senior director, partner sales acceleration, global partner organization, Cisco Systems, Inc. I had the pleasure recently of talking at length with Coles, an animated and crisp speaker, about the driving force behind the session and the accompanying Cisco case study. Part two of our discussion follows.

ASAP Media: How does Cisco Systems enter into this value exchange equation as a case study?

We will lay out an example to understand the transformation Cisco is going through according to customer needs. Their new market model is built around new consumption and outcome-based models that go to market. At Cisco, they had to go beyond selling recurring software. It was no longer about landing the deal. It was about consumption and adoption in the entire customer lifecycle, and adoption to expansion to renewal. What they had to realize was that they had to help orchestrate the ecosystem and scale out this capability. They needed a scaling engine where they had different programs, different pipelines of enablement, automation, and sales acceleration. One of their areas of sales acceleration that is co-delivered with Alliancesphere is called ACES, which stands for Accelerating Cisco Ecosystem Sales, to take the complexity out and accelerate muscle building. ACES@Scale co-develops this methodology for its use partnerships and a framework to accelerate multiparty solution sales. It’s a proven methodology to sell Cisco architecture through 100% ready solutions with a faster time to booking. The key is bringing packaged solutions to market for their channelmulti-partner solutions all the way to resellers.

What else will you be covering in this session?

We will close it off by talking about the future of co-selling, which is all around the customer, the buyers, and the solutions. And it’s really about empowering the partners to exchange value from both the buyer and seller journey to help all parties realize the desired business outcomes. We will provide point of view on complexity of solutions versus buyer dynamics. Based on different co-selling scenarios, we will determine the best way to work with your partners. It’s a muscle that needs developing at all levels of organizations: from the executive team to management to the frontline - not just the sellers or tech team. The whole organization has to begin to work and operate differently.

What is driving the change, this need for a P2P muscle-building approach?

The change in the market and what customers are looking for: real solutions to solve problems in more proactive ways that eliminate the friction and focus on their needs and deliver to their outcomes. This kind of capability muscle is incremental. Building out the muscle and muscle memory becomes more effective the more you do itit gets stronger and stronger. It will become the core to the future of business. We’re going to look at it from a market and customer view, what it could mean to the audience, and then open it up to a Q&A session.

See part one of this blog and follow the ASAP Media team’s ongoing coverage of the October 17, 2018 ASAP Tech Partner Forum on the ASAP Blog at www.strategic-alliances.org.  Learn more and register for the ASAP Tech Forum at http://asaptechforum.org

Tags:  Alliancesphere  Cisco Systems  cross-functional  digital transformation  enablement  engagement  execution  Kashif Abbasi  Lorin Coles  P2P  partner  partnering  SMART Partnering  The Rhythm of Business  value creation 

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Increasing Strength through P2P Muscle Building (Part 1): Cisco and SMART Partnering Execs Delve into the ‘Value Exchange Challenge’ at 2018 ASAP Tech Partner Forum

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Thursday, October 11, 2018

2x, 5x, 10x. How can companies gain extra oomph and advantage in the emerging multi-partner, multi-industry ecosystem? That’s the central theme of the session “Value Exchange Challenge: Building the New P2P Ecosystem Partnering Muscle” being offered at the 2018 ASAP Tech Partner Forum, “Reimaging Part­nering in a Disruptive World,” on October 17 at the Four Points by Sheraton, San Jose Airport, San Jose, California. The session will be presented by two speakers: Lorin Coles, CSAP, CEO, Alliancesphere, and principal, SMART Partnering; Kashif Abbasi, senior director, partner sales acceleration, global partner organization, Cisco Systems, Inc. I had the pleasure recently of talking at length with Coles, an animated and crisp speaker, about the driving force behind the session and the accompanying Cisco case study. Part one  of our discussion follows.

ASAP Media: Why is value so central to your presentation?

Lorin Coles: The core of all partnering and partnerships is really about value and trust. When two companies come together, they are looking for where and how they can help each other create greater value for the customer. That’s a value exchangeit occurs at multiple levels with multiple people in alliances. Partnerships in the past had specific way that they did it. Now, because of digital transformation and the speed, scale, and scope of change, it’s more complex than ever to create contextually relevant value for your partners and customers because there are new buyers, and the solutions are more complex. If there is no value, it’s difficult to partner. Value is the cornerstone in everything we do. The value exchange is where and how we are going to partner together.

How can companies build Partner-to-Partner (P2P) ecosystem partnering muscle?

Partnering evolves over time just like sports evolves over time. You need to go from enablement to engagement to execution. You do that by working cross-functionally at multiple levels with companies.

It’s important to understand the different personalities of your partner and the audience, the difference between partner types, and the functionthe marketing, sales, and product people and the roles they play in the partnership. And more importantly than ever, you need to understand the value exchange.

Building that new muscle is something a lot of people can’t do because it takes connecting dots that others don’t see. It’s important to determine if you are a novice, intermediate, advanced, or expert when building up this muscle. Companies are becoming more and more dependent on partnering and need to learn how to partner in more proactive ways than before. They need to understand when and where to bring in partners, how to leverage partners. The process is different than before because it’s across an ecosystem.

How does Cisco Systems enter into this value exchange equation as a case study?

We will lay out an example to understand the transformation Cisco is going through according to customer needs.

See the remainder of our discussion with Lorin Coles in part two of this article and follow the ASAP Media team’s ongoing coverage of the 2018 ASAP Tech Partner Forum on the ASAP Blog at www.strategic-alliances.org. Learn more and register for the 2018 ASAP Tech Partner Forum at http://asaptechforum.org

Tags:  Alliancesphere  Cisco Systems  cross-functional  digital transformation  enablement  engagement  execution  Kashif Abbasi  Lorin Coles  P2P  partner  partnering  SMART Partnering  The Rhythm of Business  value creation 

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