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2016 ASAP European Alliance Summit to Address the Latest Developments in the Evolving Partnering Ecosystem

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Wednesday, August 31, 2016
Updated: Saturday, August 27, 2016

This year’s ASAP European Alliance Summit scheduled for Nov. 3-4 hosted at the Royal Garden Hotel in London, England, should be particularly interesting given the recent news of the United Kingdom’s vote to depart from the European Union. How it might impact European alliances is certain to be addressed in the packed schedule of sessions and speakers with the Summit theme “The New Ecosystem for Partnerships.” The joint venture between ASAP and Thought Leader Global provides alliance managers in Europe and elsewhere with a window into the most current and cutting edge developments in their industries, as well as the latest in cross-industry partnering in an evolving ecosystem heavily impacted by trends taking place in the Internet of Things (IoT), healthcare, smart cities, the cloud, automotive trends, telecom, digital, and other areas.

 

Session speakers are being drawn from a pool of 30 directors of strategic alliances, multi- and cross-industry collaborators,  and collaboration business gurus.  Participants are free to choose sessions from two different streams of presentations throughout the conference.  The event will include at least 30 case study presentations, representation from over 15 different countries and over 10 different industries – from biopharma/life sciences, to energy, consumer goods, manufacturing, and technology.

 

You won’t want to miss industry experts and pundits talking about the latest advancements in their industries, such as:

  • Ole Kjems Sørensen, SVP, Head of Partnerships, DONG Energy
  • Michael Hilsenrath, Alliance Partner Business Development, Vodafone UK
  • Nick Jenkins, Marketing Partnerships and Ecosystem Director, UK, Facebook
  • Yuval Dvir, Head of EMEA Online Partnerships, Google for Work, Google
  • Hans Lindner, Head Global External Innovation and Alliances, Bayer
  • Sebastien Collignon, Director IOT Ecosystem EMEAR, Cisco
  • Michael Sumpter, Head of Alliance Mgmt, Servier Monde
  • Denis Gautheret, Vice President Alliances & Business Development, Deutsche Telekom
  • Ruben Garcia Santos, CSAP, Programme Manager Strategic Partnerships, Novo Nordisk Haemophilia Foundation
  • Sarah Sanders, Director of Partnerships, Ecosystem Strategy & Partnerships, GSMA
  • Michael Moser, CSAP, Alliances Network Collaboration, Dassault
  • Nils Bosma, GM JV Asset Management, Shell
  • Patrick Nielly, SVP Strategic Alliances, Ipsen
  • Steve Twait, CSAP, VP, Alliance and Integration Mgmt, AstraZeneca
  • Aileen Smith, Head, Digital Ecosystem Development, Huawei
  • Mikael Bäck, Global Head of Strategy Development & Portfolio, Ericsson
  • Anoop Nathwani, President UK Chapter, ASAP
  • Annick de Swaef, CSAP, President Benelux Chapter, ASAP
  • Frank Grams, VP, Head Alliance Management & Transactions, Sanofi R&D
  • Cindy Warren, VP, Business Development Neuroscience, Janssen Business Development
  • Moneshia zu Eltz, Head of Strategic Alliances and Corporate Venturing, Philips
  • Jean-Marc Gottero, VP A&C Cloud EMEA, Oracle
  • Heather Fraser, Global Lead, Life Sciences & Healthcare, IBM Institute for Business Value
  • Alistair Dixon, Senior Director, Global Alliance Mgmt, Takeda

Tap into a wide range of engaging and valuable topics presented by the best and brightest in the industry, such as:

  • New Partnership Models in a Digital LandscapeFacebook 
  • From Bilateral Alliances to Portfolios and EcosystemSanofi, Philips, IBM, Cisco 
  • Digital EcosystemsSyngenta, Huawei 
  • Ensuring a Collaborative Mindset as the Success Factor for Strategic Alliances Unilever 
  • Centers of Excellence: Reaching Higher Levels of Development in your Alliance RelationshipsTakeda 
  • Maximizing Value though DivestmentsAstraZeneca 
  • Managing Channel at a Time of Market TransformationOracle 
  • Best Practice on R&D, Innovation and Partnerships with AcademiaBayer 
  • Setting Up an Alliance Management Function in Your OrganizationServier Monde 
  • Making your Alliance GlobalJohnson & Johnson 
  • How to Manage IP in Innovation and Technology PartnershipsLundbeck 
  • Develop the Design & Managing Partnership ModelsGSMA 

Don’t miss Europe’s premiere partnering opportunity for managers, directors, CEOs, CFOs, and others interested in the latest trends in strategic alliances, business development, joint ventures, M&A, corporate development, portfolio management, integration units, human resources, programme management, change management, corporate strategy, strategy execution, and PMO.

 

For a list of emerging trends and topics, speakers, attending corporations, and/or to register or download the events brochure, visit www.asapweb.org/eusummit .

Tags:  ASAP European Alliance Summit  change management  corporate strategy  cross-industry collaborations  Ecosystems  IoT  joint ventures  partnering  programme management  strategic alliances  Thought Leader Global 

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Sharing Insights and Successes at the 2017 Global Alliance Summit ASAP Issues Call for Topics and Presentations and Opens Nominations for 2017 Alliance Excellence Awards

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Monday, August 29, 2016
Updated: Saturday, August 27, 2016

The ASAP Global Alliance Summit is a great place to learn, grow,  and network. It’s also a tremendous opportunity for your company and its workers to shine. Please pull up a chair at the programming table, brainstorm with us, and help ASAP create the world’s largest and most prestigious gathering of alliance executives. We’re asking you and your company to be part of our team and submit ideas to the Call for Topics & Presentations by September 15, 2016, the deadline for the 2017 ASAP Global Alliance Summit in San Diego, California, Feb. 28-March 2. If you have questions or comments about ASAP’s Call for Topics & Presentations, please visit our website at www.asapweb.org/cft 

While you’re at it, don’t forget to mark your calendars for the 2017 Global Alliance Summit to gain exclusive access to the most current models, methods, research, and practices, as well as metrics and tools in the part­nering and alliance management profession. Imbibe the latest developments and practices in the industry through powerful keynotes, presentations, and executive panels, as well as extensive networking opportunities.   


As the insider, you know what your company is up to behind the scenes. Maybe it needs to be made public and shared for others to emulate. It may be time for your company and colleagues to be recognized for exceptional alli­ance practices. Please consider submitting a nomination for the 2017 ASAP Alliance Excellence Awards, to be an­nounced at the 2017 ASAP Global Alliance Summit in San Diego. We want to hear about your successes
and so do others! Use the Quick Form for pre-screening, followed by completion of the standard, long form in a specific award category for review. Is your company having a significant so­cial impact through partnering? If so, consider submitting for the Corporate Social Responsibility Award. Let your colleagues know, too, about this exceptional award oppor­tunity. You can learn more about the submission process by going www.asapweb.org/awards.

Tags:  alliance  ASAP Alliance Excellence Awards  ASAP Global Alliance Summit  Call for Topics and Presentations  metrics  networking  partnering  practices  programming  research 

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‘If You Are Looking for Answers, You Are in the Wrong Session’: Finding the Value of IoT in the Brave New World of Mega-Multi-Partnering

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Monday, June 27, 2016

Solving the challenge of partnering in the Internet of Things has become a major puzzle for even the most skilled alliance executives. It’s a complex Rubik’s Cube of possibilities with multiple cross-industry, interlinking combinations. 

Take, for example, Joan Meltzer, CSAP, IBM alliance executive for Twitter and former smarter cities go-to-market leader at IBM Analytics, and a 36-year veteran at IBM Corp.; Mary Beth Hall, director of product development for IoT at Verizon, where she has worked for the past 20 years; Tony DeSpirto, CSAP, managing director of strategic accounts at Schneider Electric.  These seasoned alliance leaders manipulated the Rubik’s Cube in a panel discussion moderated by Jan Twombly, CSAP, president of The Rhythm of Business, entitled “Capturing the Value of IoT” at the March 1-4 2016 ASAP Global Alliance Summit“Partnering Everywhere: Expert Leadership for the Ecosystem,” held at the Gaylord National Resort & Convention Center, National Harbor, Maryland. Here are some snippets from their provocative conversation: 

Joan: If you are looking for answers, you are in the wrong session. We are all good at managing our jobs one-on-one. If there is any area that companies can’t do it alone, it’s IoT. It’s very complex. We still need the discipline of alliance management and strategy, and we still need to think value creation and capture to put out the whole value chain—it’s how the partners are going to make money. 

Tony: Schneider Electric is focused on the industrial IoT. We are in the infrastructure of everything. What we are struggling with now is how do we make money in IoT? We see value in data, but it needs to be processed through analytics. How to value the partners you have is part of the equation.  

Mary Beth: Verizon has been a Telecom business for the last 20 years and is now shifting to a technology company. I am managing our ThingSpace platform [designed to simplify the development and launch of IoT applications]. How many people have an Apple watch or app for phone tracking health? That’s one example of how Verizon is making money. Think about a smart sneaker, a sensor in a sneaker that tracks cadence and whether you are hydrated. How do we proliferate that? Is Nike willing to allow us to put partners in their ecosystem that were competitors? Fitbit and MyFitnessPal are allowing potential competitors into that space. We as thought leaders in that space need to adapt to that. How do we do that? There’s not one player at the table any more, there are six or seven, and that is really changing the way we market things. 

Tony: We in this room are unencumbered by that to a certain degree. As alliance managers, we have an ability and obligation to seek out these new business models. Thinking of how we will make money in two or ten years, the ideas are not going to come from executive management. They are going to come from peers in the room. You need to say “yes,” and figure out how it will be done. For most executives, it’s an uncomfortable thing to turn that “yes” into a repeatable model. 

Joan: It’s like sitting at a table with an elevator and escalator company, and working with them together. The elevator manufacturer is about maintenance. With IoT, the elevator can connect with the escalator, and that’s a new revenue stream. The functionality evolves into our revenue stream. 

Mary Beth: We need to put it together for the customer. That is some of the challenge we have seen at Verizon. Partners and customers require treading on new ground for partnership models with the unique needs of customers in mind. For example, there is a winery on the West Coast. They need to be able to fertilize the ground. We are helping provide data for the soil. It’s not a hard thing for us as technologists, but it is for farmers who are not used to be in that data space. And they can in turn sell it to other wineries. 

Tony: How many of your companies have IoT initiatives? Our senior leadership is thinking about how they can make their numbers today, so it’s all the more incumbent upon us to blaze that trail and show them where that value is. The fundamentals of partnering don’t change. It’s still basic blocking and tackling. The people you are talking with might change, and the executive management of a company might need more partnering intelligence. 

Mary Beth: In terms of driving change at Verizon, I am in the product role. When the product was fully ready for customers, we would launch. Now we can’t do that. We’re moving from a command-and-control leadership to a more servant leadership. I’m in the product and new business group, and you’re going to see some cool stuff coming out of Verizon that you haven’t seen before.  

Joan: You need to figure out the whole chain to deliver the solution. We started to see that in the cloud. But there is a gap in the solution where we don’t always have access to the marketplace. 

Mary Beth: Sometimes it’s about looking at a new market in a new way. Putting things together in new ways to get leadership to buy into it. Show them a little bit of what it looks like. 

Jan: The fundamentals of partnering are the same, but how do you keep the same with six to seven partners? How do you make sure everyone is getting the value? 

Tony: The concept doesn’t change. I believe that when you try to get six to seven people to agree, it won’t happen. There will always be someone who will win and lose because of the complexity. When things are tough, I go back to the fundamentals, like let’s get together at least once a quarter. 

Mary Beth: We had to break the barrier between legally what we felt we could do and what the market was asking for. We said “We are going to open everything up, we are breaking down barriers.” We put in governance around the partners in that space, and they are partners that are reselling that service. But the complexity in IoT is still there. We are desperately trying to simplify it. We are not there yet. 

Joan: We are all about repeatability, but you have to have assets that are repeatable. With smart cities, we are able to package things up and periscope it. I expect the same thing to happen with IoT. But you may not be able to resell that solution. I hope next year we will be able to talk about repeatability because none of us can afford to be in an on-and-off business. 

Tony: We need to get our leaders out of the comfort zone. That’s what we get paid for. 

Joan: You need a really solid project manager who will require everyone to come together. Ask what’s hot? Healthcare, the automotive industry, airplanes—anything with asset management is very hot. 

Tony: With the industrial portion of manufacturing, the technology on the factory floor is 30 to 40 years old. That’s slowly opening up. There is money to be made in the data that is involved in manufacturing. That is a data rich environment. 

Mary Beth: Simplify the complexities with your partners, be innovative, and finally, don’t be afraid to go after something you think is there. 

Tags:  2016 ASAP Global Alliance Summit  alliance executive  Alliance Managers  data rich  IBM  innovative  IoT  Jan Twombly  Joan Meltzer  Mary Beth Hall  partnering  Partners  Schneider Electric  The Rhythm of Business  Tony DeSpirto  Verizon 

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Building Win-Win Partnerships By Challenging and Reordering Your Assumptions

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Monday, May 23, 2016
Updated: Saturday, May 21, 2016

Many organizations struggle with partnership execution because of their flawed assumptions, says Stuart Kliman, CA-AM, partner, alliance practice head at Vantage Partners. They need to replace those limited assumptions with more progressive ones, he emphasized in his session “Winning Through Partnering” at the March 1-4 2016 Global Alliance Summit“Partnering Everywhere: Expert Leadership for the Ecosystem,” held at the Gaylord National Resort & Convention Center, National Harbor, Maryland. 

“If you think about how organizations are built, where they come from, organizations—even big old ones—start with the founders’ strategic assumptions of how you win. Those assumptions permeate the building of the organization. The strategic assumption of how you win drives your focus, leadership, structure, incentives, tools, skills, and how you ask people to think.  All of this leads to results,” added the Harvard University faculty member, who has led international conflict resolution through CMG (now part of Mercy Corps), and whose session is a spin-off from the Harvard Negotiation Project. Kliman helps clients maximize the value from partnerships through effective conflict management, negotiation, and relationship management

“You can’t bolt an alliance onto an organization that is not built for partnering—trying to execute partnerships in a world that has not been built for partnership execution,” he said. “We see more and more organizations coming to us to solve that problem.” 

He then highlighted the difference between organizations designed to succeed at external partnering and those that are not. “How do you know that an organization has been built with partnering at its core? And how do you create an organization that is built for partnering versus individual alliances?” he asked. Partnering success depends on these critical components, he pointed out: 

  • Organization is not self-centric
  • Mission statement is partner-oriented
  • Executives and senior leadership looks to alliance management in their options
  • Company has a reputation as a partner of choice
  • Website shows partnering and partnering solutions
  • Leadership does not cascade down
  • Completely flexible
  • Right mix of skills and employees doing the partnering
  • Core competencies training

Organizations should analyze the difference between a progressive partnering stance and one with poor assumptions, he told the audience. “You start with an assumption, and you build on that, and then you break it down into component parts,” he instructed. “You can then map how that strategic assumption drives culture, leadership, focus, organizational structure, incentives, processes and tools, mindset, and skills,” he said, while showing a complex deck slide. 

These lead to good or flawed behaviors, such as the attitude “make them come to us” or the de-prioritization of partner meetings, which all lead to bad results, he added.

“You are saying on the one hand that your goal is to be a world-class partnering organization, but your language says something else.” 

While showing a deck slide on a vicious cycle that threatens partnering success, he provided an example of a CEO who was calling the company partners “gap fillers.” The beginning and ending of the cycle was “We will win through out own expertise.” 

When designing the internal organization, ask these questions: “How is this going to work in alliances? How do we structure this to be externally facing or centric?” he advised. “Without collaboration and negotiation skills, we are likely to fail. By comparison, when we start building with creativity and clear communication, and we launch partnerships with a focus on effective execution, we get this,” he said, flashing a slide with a reversal of the problematic cycle to a virtuous one that ends with “Our company is successful given the value and competitive edge that we get from partnering—partners bring their best opportunities to us.” 

“If you think of the mission of the typical alliance organization, there is a mission statement that says ‘Put alliance managers on alliances to ensure individual alliance support.’ The second aspect of the mission is to ensure that the company is the best possible partnering organization it can be and ensure that it’s a partner of choice. Far too often, we in alliance management have not focused in on the second aspect of the mission,” he concluded. “We see this more and more—a key role for alliance management is embedding the partnering capability deep into the organization—because it’s in your mission statement.” 

Tags:  alliance  conflict management  culture  incentives  leadership  negotiation  organizational structure  partnering  partnership execution  relationship management  Stu Kliman  Vantage Partners 

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It is Time to Think Differently - Taming the Complexity of IoT Partnering

Posted By Jan Twombly, CSAP and Jeff Shuman, CSAP, PhD | The Rhythm of Business and SMART Partnering, Wednesday, May 4, 2016

The Internet of Things (IoT) is upending partnering “best practices.” One practice is clear: no company succeeds alone. It takes an ecosystem.

This is partnering at a scale, scope, and speed unprecedented until now. It requires creativity and bold experimentation. Companies must learn quickly, iterate strategies, manage complexity, and try new models for value creation, delivery, and capture.

“We know how to partner. We’ve been doing it for 20 years.” These are deadly words when said about partnering for the Internet of Things. The fundamentals of partnering may still apply – or not – but businesses that until now have been relatively un-digitized are discovering tremendous opportunities to rethink their operations and economics. This necessitates partnering:

  • Across industries and sectors
  • With many more companies for any given industry solution
  • At a greater speed to assemble and reassemble the right partners for each customer scenario
  • With agility, shifting from orchestrator to participant, sometimes with the same customer
  • In conjunction with “Everything as a Service” business models

Innovate and Experiment

Companies that succeed at building the partnering ecosystem required for the IoT take a page from design thinking: Start with the experience of the end customer and play that back to solution development. Those that succeed think similarly about the partner experience, making it easy to engage and drive down transaction costs. They do not lock onto any specific business or partnering model; rather they experiment and learn which of the assumptions you’ve made are valid and which are invalid and need to be iterated.

Instead of copying what competitors consider “best practices,” companies that remake their partnering capabilities for today’s connected world look for other inspiration. For example, Médicins sans Frontières (Doctors without Borders) assembles teams of medical and logistical professionals when conflict breaks out or there is an epidemic. The network has the ability to quickly assemble and then disband when the work is done because it knows what each partner considers valuable and works to ensure that value is received, thus maintaining willingness to participate and contribute value.

Companies throughout the ecosystem, regardless of their role or roles, must be willing to take some risks and fund experimentation to determine what is repeatable and scalable, both in the business and partnering models and in how partnering operations are carried out.

Connective Tissue or Achilles’ Heel

At the ASAP Global Summit in March keynote presenter Jonathan Ballon, Vice President of Intel’s Internet of Things (IoT) Group made it very clear that IoT is a massive opportunity to create and realize tremendous economic value; transforming industries; changing products, services, and solutions, and disrupting business models. He also emphasized that partnering and alliances are the connective tissue required to realize this value. The SMART Partnering Alliance of The Rhythm of Business and Alliancesphere argues that success in the ecosystem partnering required by IoT is not happenstance – it takes careful design. If your company’s partnering capability is insufficient for the task, partnering might be your Achilles’ heel – the exposed and unprotected weak spot of your organization. Alliance professionals have a duty to provide their executives with a roadmap across the new partnering landscape.

Over the next few months, we’ll be publishing a series of blog posts and white papers that explore what is different about partnering in the IoT - and how to apply design thinking – what we call Partner By Design to evolving partnering practices for the connected ecosystem era and everything as a service business models.

Missed the Summit Keynote? Read a Summary and Perspective on it from SMART Partnering.

ASAP was given permission by ASAP Corporate Member, EPPP, and guest bloggers Jan Twombly, CSAP and Jeff Shuman, CSAP, PhD of The Rhythm of Business and SMART Partnering to reprint the contributed blog. 

Tags:  alliance professionals  alliances  Alliancesphere  business model  ecosystem  Intel  Internet of Things  Jonathan Ballon  partner  partnering  SMART Partnering Alliance  The Rhythm of Business 

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