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Morphing Your Partnering Philosophy in a Changing World of Digital Drivers (Part One)

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Wednesday, March 28, 2018

Key sectors of the economy are struggling to adapt to disruptions from digital technologies, such as the cloud. The change is resulting in new business models and service sector opportunities in areas such as security and supply chains. In the 2018 ASAP Global Alliance Summit session “Partnering with Change in a World of Ongoing Disruption,” Joe Schramm, vice president of strategic alliances at BeyondTrust, and Morgan Wheaton, senior director, global partner alliances & channels at JDA Software, addressed the huge transformations taking place in these sectors. BeyondTrust has been a provider of cybersecurity software since 1985. JDA Software is one of the largest providers of supply chain and retail technology. The following insights and excerpts from the session drill down to the core of some of today’s most pressing partnering questions during a time of digital transformation:

Joe Schramm: In traditional channels, it’s about “How much product can I sell?” It’s now about “How much value-added service can I provide?” If you can’t adapt [to that new model], you will be out of business.

Morgan Wheaton: The way that you manage cash flow as a software company has changed to subscription-based. But making that change from large payments to a little every month is a chasm that some companies can’t cross.

Schramm: Our origins are more in network operations, but today, we offer complete solutions in privilege access management (PAM) and are a recognized leader in the market. BeyondTrust’s job is to protect companies from bad actors. There are three types of bad actors: nation state-sponsored actors, such as Russia, China, etc., that are after intellectual property to get trade secrets; “hacktavists”; identity thieves. They break the perimeter through fishing with suspicious email links or known vulnerabilities—such as the Microsoft operating system, Adobe, your car, pacemaker, the Grid—to gain access and control. Once in, they try to hijack privileges. Our technology  is used to reduce administrator rights. What’s new is that more in the manufacturing sector are starting to wake up and realize their IP is being compromised. Meeting those customer needs and adapting to digital technologies required rethinking partnering.

The old paradigm:

  • We sold tools; installed them
  • Partnered with resellers to fulfill
  • Systems integrators viewed as competitive
  • No strategy to extend reach

The new paradigm:

  • We sell complex solutions; partners implement
  • Partners sourcing and implementing new businesses
  • Systems integrators are strategic partners
  •   We can’t grow fast enough

Wheaton: At JDA, our customers are some of the biggest companies out there, such as all 15 of the top car companies; 60 percent of soap makers; 70 percent of prescriptions get filled by JDA software. We are seeing their world being disrupted by the cloud. Consider what Amazon is doing by creating a standard for customers where they can order a product by mail that can be returned in a day. They are setting a new bar, and retailers are undergoing massive disruption and asking “How do we compete with this?” Manufacturers need to innovate and deliver in record time. Distributors must reinvent themselves to remain relevant. What does this mean for JDA? Every CEO out there is rethinking their supply chain. We are seeing very much the same things at supply chain companies as they are at security companies. In the old paradigm, systems integrators were viewed as competitors. We partnered opportunistically—there was little standardization.

The old paradigm:

  • We offer turnkey solutions
  • Service partners only extend JDA delivery capacity
  • Systems integrators viewed as competitive
  • No need to extend reach
  • Partner opportunistically

The new paradigm

  • Together we grow the pie
  • Partners help to complete the solution
  • Systems integrators are strategic partners
  • We can’t grow fast enough
  • Partner with intent

We had to reinvent our program with three components:  Consulting partners, to help with implementation and customer strategy; tech partners; selling partners.

So how do you recognize and strategize for the current and anticipated future paradigm shifts? Schramm and Wheaton took turns answering this question, which was relevant to both industries:

  • Practice Open Communication: with partners, customers, and industry leaders.
  • Observe the Competition: What are they messaging? Are you losing your partners?
  • Watch Market Makers.
  • Watch Start-ups—how they are disrupting and how they are doing.

Part II of this post will address how key cultural changes are needed to better enable new partnering models. 

Tags:  alliances  BeyondTrust  channels  communication  cybersecurity software  disruption  implementation  JDA Software  partner  Partnering Philosophy  partners  servic  start-ups 

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The Importance of Broadening Your Definition of ROI in Partnering from the Perspective of Cisco and Dimension Data

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Thursday, February 8, 2018
Updated: Wednesday, February 7, 2018

I recently had the pleasure of interviewing Steve McGarr, senior director of the Cisco global partner organization, for the article “Saving Endangered Species, One Gigabyte at a Time,” which appears as a case study in the cover story on out-of-the-box thinking in the Q4 2017issue of Strategic Alliance Magazine. McGarr is also quoted in the same issue’s The Close column, “The Magic in Finding the Right Partner,” where he talks about the dynamic relationship between the two companies. Cisco and Dimension Data have partnered for the past 26 years, and their Connected Conservation technology to save endangered species is part of a series of projects the companies conceived that involve connected technology for societal good.

To celebrate their 25th anniversary of collaboration, the alliance partners kicked off 25 projects for creating social good, which landed them a spot as a finalist for an ASAP Alliance Excellence Award. Four awards will be presented at the upcoming 2018 ASAP Global Alliance Summit “Propelling Partnering for the On-Demand World: New Perspectives + Proven Practices for Collaborative Business,” March 26-28 in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, USA (see the official awards announcement at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2018/01/prweb15131526.htm). The following continues our conversation with McGarr beyond what appears in the Strategic Alliance Magazine article.

Your case study that appears in the 2017 Q4 Strategic Alliance Magazine describes your alliance to protect rhinos and other endangered species. What was the impetus for the project?

It’s important to me to care about the things that our partners and customers care about. It’s a guiding principle of Cisco. When considering the need for connected technology projects around the world, we asked “What are some of the problems that are plaguing South Africa?” Illegal poaching is one of them. As an American, we don’t see that every day. The more I understood the problem, the more it seemed like an opportunity to get Cisco involved. So Doc Watson of Dimension Data, myself, and local conservationists—people that lived in the bush country—discussed the possibility of creating a Cloud technology solution for the poaching problem near South Africa’s Kruger National Park.

The system is now in place and replicable for other endangered species. Are there similar applications for this type of security system?

 

This project emerged as a great use case opportunity for Cisco and Dimension Data to demonstrate the use of our technologies, architectures, solutions, and capabilities and demonstrate the applicability of this use case in industrial practice. The same methodology—the same idea using network architectures, sensors, Internet of Things software—has industry applications in border security, mining, and a variety of other industries. It was our idea to demonstrate these emerging technologies and have applicability in industry while doing good.

What other connected technology projects have you collaborated on recently?

Another project Cisco did with Dimension Data helps breast cancer patients in the United Kingdom stay connected. These women were talking about feeling isolated and wanted to be part of the community. So we created the Cisco Spark App to help them always be there for each other. When you are feeling powerless, technology that connects helps. The partnership allows us to imagine, build, deliver, and to help people while we demonstrate our technology.

What role did collaboration play in helping these out-of-the-box solutions become reality?

There are so many great individual siloed technology projects and creators that are in need of a platform. It reminds me of that commercial with a bank robbery in progress: If you are not connected to a platform, you are a car alarm going off in the night without any ability to analyze or act. Cisco and Dimension Data have been so wonderful to me and my teams—they allowed us to invest in projects like this to demo our technology. The supportive attitude was one of “Let’s demo it while we see societal value.” The companies have been partners now for 26 years. They have delivered in so many industries—too many to count. They see projects like this as an opportunity to really be immersive in the world. It’s so much fun, it really is. And sometimes magic happens—the right individuals, environment, capability, and you dare to speak and share your imagination. And we’ve been fortunate that our leadership rallied to our imagination. So I would encourage any reader to take a broad definition of ROI—that’s what we did. If you broaden your definition to include opportunities for societal value, replicability of technology, and solution standards—you will find that organizations want to invest. It’s going to pay off in ways you couldn’t even imagine. A broader interpretation will require a broader analysis of the benefit.

The 2018 Alliance Excellence Award Winners will be announced on March 27, 2018 at the ASAP Global Alliance Summit. Learn more about and register for the 2018 Summit—ASAP’s flagship event and the world’s largest annual gathering of partnering executives—at http://asapsummit.org/. Read more about all of the finalists for the 2018 ASAP Alliance Excellence Awards in the January 2018 edition of eSAM Plus. See the official ASAP announcement of the 2018 finalists at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2018/01/prweb15131526.htm

Tags:  ASAP Alliance Excellence Awards  Cisco  Cisco Spark App  Dimension Data  IoT  partners  ROI  societal value  Steve McGarr 

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NOT ‘Business as Usual:’ What the BioPharma Channel Can Glean From High Tech

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Monday, October 16, 2017
Updated: Sunday, October 15, 2017

Partnering isn’t “business as usual” anymore. “Even companies that think they have their practices down are all reinventing what they are doing now because they have to deal with … the increasing speed, scale, and scope of partnering that has become exponentially greater,” emphasized Jan Twombly, CSAP, The Rhythm of Business, Inc., during her session “The BioPharma Channel: Leveraging Practices from the High-Tech World to Drive Success.” Twombly was presenting at the 2017 ASAP BioPharma Conference, “Accelerating Life Science Collaborations: Better Partnering, Better Outcomes,” held Sept. 13-15 at the Royal Sonesta Boston, Cambridge, Mass.

“The high tech channel has learned that you are not going to be successful if your channel partners aren’t successful. … You need customized partners to provide local market access. High tech needs new partners because it needs vertical and technical specialization. Some companies do this better than others,” she added. For example, Cisco generates 85 percent of revenues by channel partners. That’s exceptional, considering that the industry average is 39 percent.

The channel is a route to market that is accessed either by communication avenues, a direct sale force, or co-commercializing a product with a partner. It’s about delivering on intended value in a resource-friendly way, she added.  Biopharma usually doesn’t consider the channel as key to growth. Yet market growth trends and future projections from BMI Research indicate that unmet patient needs and the significant growth potential of emerging markets provide significant reason for pursuing a channel strategy, Twombly said, while flashing past market size data and future size projections:

2010: $150 billion
2015: $245 billion
2020: $340 billion
2025: $490 billion

High-tech channel partners are not seeking more automation, Twombly observed.  What they are looking for is:

  • More engagement with field engineers and local sales personnel
  • Greater understanding of corporate priorities
  • Joint planning on strategic opportunities
  • Better understanding of their partners’ strategies and plans
  • More proactive communications, support, and relationship management

So what can the biopharma industry learn from high tech’s successes with channel partnering? Twombly asked.

  1. Take a portfolio approach: Place bets carefully, and manage it as a portfolio from low-touch to high-touch.
  2. Carefully manage the transitions, and ensure partner (and stakeholder) readiness.
  3. Maintain robust measurements, reporting, and action from a 360-degree perspective. We are becoming very data driven.
  4. Make it part of the fabric of the organization from end to end: Bake it in, don’t bolt it on. You need to have a strategy, and the partnering needs to be integrated into various functions of your company.

That’s critical to the entire process, she emphasized:  “Baking it in. … We like using a stakeholder management model. In many instances, you will not have dedicated people. You need to understand the economics; have good reporting and data collection that are able to be monitored; focus on closing the gap between current practice and what stakeholders need to profitably support the channel partners. That is how you will demonstrate value,” she advised.

“Governance is sometimes not in place,” she added. “You want simpler governance because of the nature of the relationships, but still need to have executive and operations levels to formal governance. Make sure you have the right participants engaged, set expectations, and have proper alignment and meetings. Make them good, formal meetings, but create an environment people will want to attend. The quarterly business reviews in high tech are typically all one way. If you really want to build that relationship so the partner can help you with market access and driving the business, you need to make it a two-way meeting.”

Consider conducting partner summits, she concluded. In the high tech world, they are a staple for building relationships by helping partners learn what’s new and where company strategies are headed. Summits provide an opportunity to have all your partners together to learn about common challenges.

ASAP Members can learn more about this provocative and well-attended ASAP BioPharma Conference session in the September 2017 issue of eSAM Plus.

Tags:  alignment  ASAP BioPharma Conference  BMI Research  channel partners  channels  governance  high tech  Jan Twombly  partners  portfolio approach  stakeholder  summits  The Rhythm of Business 

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Collaborating at Digital Transformation Speed: Report from the ASAP Tech Partner Forum, Part Two

Posted By ohn W. DeWitt, Monday, June 19, 2017

When I think of digitization, disruptive technologies, and the blistering pace of change, I understand that it impacts companies of all sizes. But, like many folks I’m guessing, I have this image in my head of nimble hotshot startups headed by 26-year-olds causing all the disruption and driving all the innovation. But of course, that’s not the case at all—tech industry giants like Cisco and Intel, and leading storage solution players such as NetApp, “aren’t young companies,” noted Erna Arnesen, CSAP—NetApp is 25 years old, Cisco 30, and Intel 40. But they are in the thick of driving digital transformation through ecosystem partnering with a diversity of players, from startups to decades-old tech firms to an increasing number of vertical industry operational technology companies.

We were talking with Arnesen last Thursday, the morning after the inaugural ASAP Tech Partner Forum in Santa Clara, Calif. (see Part One of our coverage http://www.strategic-alliances.org/blogpost/1143942/278261/Collaborating-at-Digital-Transformation-Speed-Report-from-the-ASAP-Tech-Partner-Forum-Part-One). On the conference line with me and ASAP Media Managing Editor Cynthia B. Hanson, Arnesen was joined by Gregory Burge, CSAP, a consultant and immediate past president of the Silicon Valley Chapter, Citrix alliance executive and current chapter president Ana Brown, CA-AM, and Norma Watenpaugh, CSAP, and Ann Trampas, CSAP, both of Phoenix Consulting Group.  Where we left the conference recap, Arnesen and colleagues had just described the very effective opening presentation by two NVIDIA executives.

Now we were discussing the three established tech leaders represented in her panel discussion focused on “Strategies You Need to Partner Everywhere” the previous morning. Arnesen, a familiar face in Silicon Valley and ASAP for many years, moderated a discussion among Steen Graham, general manager, IoT ecosystem/channels, Internet of Things Group, Intel Corporation, Maria Olson, CSAP, VP of global and strategic alliances at NetApp, and Andres Sintes, Cisco’s global senior director, partner GTM, digital transformation & IoT. The three talked about how their large organizations are making key strategic shifts and embracing “the importance of these large-scale, multi-partner, broader ecosystems,” Arnesen said.

One “back to the future” theme that emerged: verticalization driven by engagement with operational technology (OT) companies. The panel delved into the shift required to move beyond partnering with traditional partners. “As the Internet of Things [IoT] and digitization have transformed partnering, the operational technology players who didn’t come from the IT world are really the players that we are engaging with IoT and a lot of these other disruptive technologies,” Arnesen explained.

Panelists emphasized that “multi-partner engagement is key because of the complexity and size of digital transformation solutions,” Watenpaugh commented—and this raises many strategic questions for companies and their strategy and partnering leaders to sort through now. “To do these at scale, you’re going to market as an ecosystem of partners. The verticalization discussion was interesting—are companies really verticalizing? The operational technology companies have specific industry expertise but often lack the IT expertise. So are we going back to the future with verticalization—for example, with vertically oriented VARs [value-added resellers]? Are horizontal partners going away or rendered less relevant because we are leading with vertical applications?”

Definitive answers are still being determined—but even amidst unprecedented change, the “80/20 rule” applies. “The panel emphasized that you’ve still got to focus on your bread-and-butter [that drives] 80 percent of revenue while you’re doing these innovative partnerships. In the midst of SaaS [Software-as-a-Service], you still need the edge devices, the sensors, and analytics. And you need to engineer the business processes and human interface—if there is one,” Watenpaugh said. “This requires tight integration and coordination of these components, and it needs to be simplified so that it is digestible and repeatable.”

Burge added that he was intrigued when Steen Graham brought up an interesting new concept—“the IoT aggregator”—in the context of this discussion. The aggregator bundles these solutions so they can be deployed repeatedly and at scale.

Many of the themes continued into the next presentation by Karen Dougherty, vice president of channel and alliances at GE Digital, Brown recalled.  Dougherty’s presentation, “Building a Thriving Ecosystem: GE Digital's Partner Journey,” walked attendees through recent developments at a company that predates the 20th Century. “I thought her presentation was super strong—really effective,” Brown noted. “I liked it for two reasons. At events like ASAP’s Tech Partner Forum, I find it really valuable to learn about what multinational conglomerates, like GE, are actually doing. We learned from Karen Dougherty how they’ve taken a 125-year-old company and pivoted to the conceptual era of software-defined business intelligence and big data analytics with Predix, a cloud-based PaaS [Platform-as-a-Service] that enables industrial-scale analytics—asset performance management [APM]—and has been a key component in building and managing the company’s ecosystem partnerships.”

Arnesen chimed in to agree with Brown’s assessment. “She gave us a lot of information. Her division alone is 28,000 employees at GE Digital, and hiring another 20,000 by end of year. … GE built Predix, this platform of its own, and calls it a ‘purpose-built platform for industry.’ Consider that they are driving a lot of the change in traditional industrial companies. They called it the ‘digital industrial blueprint.’ It takes big players with deep pockets to do this,” Arnesen noted.

“Karen Dougherty’s presentation was so rich, talking about enabling productivity around industrial assets using Predix, which interacts with physical assets—asset performance management and operations optimization providing a way to connect machines, data, and people,” Brown continued. “She shared a real-world renewable energy example involving wind turbines, using the capabilities of the software to predict that something’s going to go wrong—an example using an industrial asset that will be more and more relevant in the next few years because of the worldwide efforts to combat climate change. Dougherty was crisp and, from tech perspective, so interesting,” she enthused.

Dougherty also touched on the impact of all the data now being collected via the industrial Internet, noted Trampas. “In her Schindler example, they can now answer the question, ‘How many people are there on the escalator at Union Station at the middle of the day?’ And they can sell this data, which is a new business for people like Schindler,” Trampas added.

At this point, we have only gotten to lunch—this just completes our recap of the morning’s presentations. If you haven’t already, be sure to check out Part One of ASAP Media’s recap of the June 7, 2017 ASAP Tech Partner Forum at http://www.strategic-alliances.org/blogpost/1143942/278261/Collaborating-at-Digital-Transformation-Speed-Report-from-the-ASAP-Tech-Partner-Forum-Part-One. Stay tuned for more ASAP Media coverage of the conference, including the forthcoming Part Three of this series, where we’ll discuss topics and insights from afternoon sessions, including “Customer Experience Is the New Competitive Battleground” presented by Tiffani Bova of Salesforce. 

Tags:  Andres Sintes  asset performance management  broader ecosystems  Cisco  digitization  disruptive technologies  ecosystem  industrial Internet  Intel  Internet of Things  IoT  Maria Olson  multi-partner engagement  NetApp  operations optimization  partnering  partners  Steen Graham  strategic shifts  verticalizing 

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Collaborating at Digital Transformation Speed: Report from the ASAP Tech Partner Forum, Part One

Posted By John W. DeWitt, Monday, June 12, 2017

ASAP Media Managing Editor Cynthia B. Hanson and I caught up with leading ASAP members from the ASAP Silicon Valley Chapter—and one from the ASAP Midwest Chapter—in an 8 a.m. Pacific debriefing the morning after the inaugural ASAP Tech Partner Forum in Santa Clara, Calif. Despite the early hour, triumph and excitement remained palpable on the conference call as the group of executives described the fruits of more than six months spent planning the event in conjunction with ASAP staff executive Diane Lemkin.

“It was pretty amazing. It all came together. I can’t believe it actually all happened after all that effort,” enthused Erna Arnesen, CSAP, chief channel and alliance officer at ZL Technologies. “Seventy-four people showed up. A few people registered right at the end. One guy signed up that morning—he came from Tahoe. The group of people was very diverse, coming from across Silicon Valley from most of the leading companies and from startups, so there was a very wide swath of companies represented.” Also, she added, “It was a good cross-section of ASAP members and nonmembers.”

Leading tech companies represented included Cisco, NetApp, Intel, SAP, GE Digital, VMWare, Citrix, Splunk, Oracle, ServiceNow, Cognizant, Microsoft, and Xerox. Aside from Silicon Valley, attendees came from San Francisco and points across the Bay Area. “We had quite a few people from Southern California,” noted Norma Watenpaugh, CSAP, principal of Phoenix Consulting Group. Her Phoenix Consulting colleague Ann Trampas, CSAP, flew in from Chicago where she also is a professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Trampas chimed in, “We also had folks from Scottsdale, and someone came down from Seattle from JDA Software” to join several other JDA colleagues, “there were several execs from Hitachi Data Systems, including one from Minnesota, and we had several people fly in from the East Coast,” she added.

“From the perspective of an attendee, the quality of the program was exceptional,” Trampas said. “It was right up there with the quality of ASAP Global Alliance Summit presentations, but in a more intimate environment allowing you more access to those speakers. So I was blown away by the program.”

“A lot of attendees said they liked the intimate grouping, the roundtables, that the room was ‘comfortably full,’” Watenpaugh said. “And by staying with the high-tech focus for the entire event, they felt the topics were targeted and addressed issues that participants had really dealt with in their companies. It was not a generic ‘this is how you do metrics,’ but rather, ‘this is how you work in high-tech partnering in the context of digital transformation.’”

After the welcome, host sponsor NVIDIA kicked off the ASAP Tech Partner Forum with what our group of reviewers described as an impressively relevant and “buttoned-up” presentation by John Fanelli, product vice president for NVIDIA GRID, and Olimpio DeMarco, director of strategic alliances for manufacturing & Architecture, Engineering, and Construction (AEC) industries for NVIDIA, a maker of graphics processing units (GPUs) that is evolving beyond its roots in making graphics processor boards for gaming. Beyond gaming, the company is developing technologies that venture into the real world and virtually real world: supercomputing, artificial intelligence, and deep learning, Watenpaugh said.

“John Fanelli and Olimpio DeMarco really set the tone for the rest of the day—it was really good,” commented Greg Burge, a consultant and former San Mateo County alliance executive with a long history at IBM who is the immediate past president of the ASAP Silicon Valley Chapter. NVIDIA developed CUDA—which stands for Compute Unified Device Architecture—as the company’s programming interface and software architecture framework for writing to a GPU. “They described how this software programming model has affected NVIDIA’s approach to its partner ecosystem—anytime you bring in software development, it changes the way you partner,” Burge noted.

“It was really great for the host to kick off the event that way,” agreed Watenpaugh. “What I thought was fascinating is that NVIDIA has a lot of alliances with car companies around self-driving cars and artificial intelligence. Fanelli talked about both Toyota and Honda as partners.”

The highly engaged audience asked good questions, Watenpaugh noted. “One interesting question was around NVIDIA GRID—an ecosystem of five partners built to virtualize 10,000 desktop computers for Honda. ‘How do you manage that kind of constellation alliance?’”

Another participant asked the NVIDIA execs, “’What about the services required for all the complex technologies and complex ecosystem engagements you’re involved in,’” Arnesen recalled. “John Fanelli was very impressive in outlining his products, channels and alliances, but admitted that NVIDIA is just getting going building out services” and services partnerships.

“The last thing that they talked about was speed-of-light culture, or SOL culture,” Arnesen continued. At NVIDIA, “alliances are not centralized—the company has a distributed strategy and model. Olimpio DeMarco has his own alliance people that manage these different types of partners, but Fanelli said, ‘We want to be fast and nimble and agile, so we manage them as we need them for our businesses.’”

Check out the ASAP Blog for our previous articles and forthcoming ASAP Media coverage of the June 7, 2017 ASAP Tech Partner Forum in Santa Clara, Calif., hosted by NVIDIA, at www.strategic-alliances.org

Tags:  alliances  Ann Trampas  ASAP Tech Partner Forum  channels  Cisco  Citrix  Cognizant  CUDA  Erna Arnesen  GE Digital  GPU  Greg Burge  Intel  John Fanelli  Microsoft  NetApp  Norma Watenpaugh  NVIDIA  NVIDIA GRID  Olimpio DeMarco  Oracle  partner ecosystem  partners  SAP  ServiceNow  SOL culture  Splunk  VMWare  Xerox 

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