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How Do You Propel a Big, Complex Oncology Alliance Forward at Breakneck Speed? Very Carefully

Posted By Jon Lavietes, Friday, September 25, 2020

Lou Gerstner once asked, 'Who says elephants can't dance?' For the past year and a half AstraZeneca and Daiichi Sankyo have been making their pachyderm sprint like a cheetah? Last week, at the 2020 ASAP BioPharma Conference, Jonathan Bell, director of alliance and integration management at AstraZeneca, and Kenji Shigeta, vice president of DS-8201 strategy in the Global Brand Strategy Unit of Daiichi Sankyo, shared the story of their companies’ fast-moving collaboration around the cancer drug Enhertu (aka DS-8201) in a presentation titled “Executing the Biggest, Most Complex Oncology Alliance in Recent History—Learnings from the First 18 Months Together.”

The partnership has amassed impressive milestones to date. In what Shigeta termed a “speed marriage,” the two organizations announced their partnership in the spring of 2019, a mere five weeks after negotiations began in February. Shigeta also claimed that the $1.35 billion upfront payment and the subsequent $5.5 billion in milestones and other transactions represented the largest pharma deal for a single compound that has not been approved yet. The collaboration, which began with 17 programs, consisted of 43 initiatives by the time Shigeta spoke to ASAP members last week—“2.5 times larger in one year,” he said, highlighting the rapidly growing scale of the alliance.

High Response Rate: Powerful Early Results Drive Stakeholder Engagement

To move a collaboration of this magnitude forward in such a short timeframe, experienced pharma-industry observers might guess that the asset at the center could be truly special. They would be correct. Enhertu has demonstrated unprecedented efficacy in treating breast, lung, colorectal, and gastric cancers, and has already garnered national recognition in the United States—Shigeta told the audience that interviews with patients who attended the 2019 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium (SABCS) were syndicated over several CBS stations last December.   

The win-win for both companies is clear. Daiichi Sankyo is relying on AstraZeneca to help commercialize the drug outside of Japan, particularly in the United States, United Kingdom, and China. AstraZeneca gets a cut of the profits of a “best-in-class therapy,” said Shigeta. As is often the case in pharma, stakeholders on both sides of the alliance are highly motivated by Enhertu’s promise. Shigeta relayed an anecdote detailing how the alliance team received 80 responses to a survey it issued to a mix of 100 employees from both companies. He joked that the “response rate is higher than what we saw in Enhertu efficacy.” He then said that, kidding aside, this eagerness to participate in the survey illustrated a “pattern of high-level engagement and dedication” in the alliance. 

“Good Collaborative Attitude” Sets the Right Tone for the Partnership

Governance, always a critical part of any partnership, takes on even greater import when an alliance of this size and magnitude moves at breakneck speed. With a little trial and error, AstraZeneca and Daiichi Sankyo came up with a model that is arguably worthy of a business school or ASAP Handbook of Alliance Management case study. A Joint Executive Committee (JEC) sat at the top of the governance chain. Five individual committees dedicated to development, medical affairs, finance, supply chain, and commercialization, respectively, reported directly to the JEC. Underneath the Joint Commercialization Committee (JCC) sat three regional committees, one each for affairs pertaining to the United States, European Union, and all other geographies.

The first meeting of the eight senior leaders—four from each company—that made up the JEC was a fruitful one. The committee developed a joint vision statement: “Our obligation to patients is beyond what one company can achieve alone.” After the kickoff meeting, the companies communicated this vision statement, strategy, and goals of the alliance to new patients. Shigeta praised the JEC for setting the right tone for the alliance, and for creating a culture that allowed stakeholders on both sides to thrive, calling them “solution-oriented leaders” that have a “good collaboration attitude.”

“We are quite lucky to work with those exceptional leaders,” he added.

Collectively, the alliance team never stops. When employees start their day in Japan, they can take handoffs from workers in America who are wrapping up their activities for the evening. Toward the end of the Japanese workday, European stakeholders start their mornings and eventually overlap with US alliance colleagues in the afternoon and early evening.

Bogged Down: Top-Heavy Decision Making Stalls Out the Alliance Engine

When Bell took the virtual podium, he dove deeper into the machinations of the governance operation. He told the audience that the alliance had a few things going for it immediately after the launch, at least on the surface. First, the oncology lead of Sankyo’s R&D unit used to work at AstraZeneca and was thus familiar with the partner’s inner workings. In addition, both companies utilized similar cross-functional Global Project Teams (GPTs). With similar working structures, the companies initially figured they could get away with relatively simple rules of engagement—why overcomplicate governance if you don’t have to? Although well intentioned, this directive backfired to a degree. The lower committees felt they had to defer all decisions to senior management, “so what should have been relatively easy, high-level discussions at the JEC got bogged down into hours of negotiation about clinical design. It simply wasn’t working at the pace we needed to go,” said Bell.

AstraZeneca and Daiichi Sankyo decided to hold a two-day workshop under the guidance of an external agency aimed at developing course corrections. The companies administered a health check and the agency conducted one-on-one interviews prior to the event. On the first day, the joint development teams analyzed the findings and surfaced difficulties faced by stakeholders in both companies. The second day was spent driving home the idea that “a contract is not an instruction manual or a recipe book,” said Bell, making the point that beyond the JEC, the characteristics of which were spelled out in the contract, the underlying governance represented a “gray space” that could be treated as a “sandbox” for devising a structure that best fit the needs of the collaboration.

Alliance Tax Break Pays Off in Efficient Development Operation

The result was a new look for joint drug development procedures. The companies formalized the role of Joint Leadership Teams (JLTs) that sat beneath the Joint Development Committee (JDC). The JLTs and JDC were to agree upon all of the finer details before presenting initiatives to the JEC for final approval.

The new configuration had the desired effect. Loaded with relatively senior personnel, empowered to obtain approvals underneath the JEC, and now meeting weekly, the JLTs moved development items through the chain of command efficiently—fully vetted proposals were approved by the JEC 100 percent of the time after the workshop. The alliance now expects to approve as many as 15 late-stage study registrations this year. Bell said the “alliance tax bill” is much lower thanks to this expediency. 

Bell concluded by imparting four lessons to BioPharma Conference attendees. First, he credited a thorough download session conducted by Daiichi Sankyo that brought alliance stakeholders up to speed on Enhertu for setting a precedent of transparency and trust. Second, kickoff meetings are especially important in an alliance of this magnitude. Partners must agree on ways of doing things early, remain flexible during the first tests of the initial configuration, and make changes wherever necessary. Third, he recommended building “workflow archetypes”— that is, alliance managers should explore incorporating internal processes into a plan. Finally, leverage experience from other alliances. To this last point, Bell said he was fortunate to have worked on other “Goliath-Goliath” alliances in the past, such as AstraZeneca’s collaboration with Merck.

The Reward for an $18 Million Q1? The Alliance Teams Get to Do It Again

The work has paid off. On Dec. 20, 2019, the two companies received accelerated approval by the FDA two months after filing. Enhertu then amassed $18 million in US sales in this year’s first quarter. Shigeta said the clinicians are reporting exceptional responses to the drug in patients thus far.

“We cannot achieve this without fantastic and tight collaboration by two companies,” he said.

Buoyed by the success of their first year and a half working together, the joint teams entered into another major alliance initiative this past summer centered around a compound known currently as DS-1062.

In the Q&A that followed, the presenters were asked how they specifically aligned on governance before the deal was signed. Bell explained that a lot of this was covered in the five weeks of negotiations. The negotiators outlined a development plan and approved a joint business plan for US operations. Shigeta said the compressed timeframe actually spurred the teams to prioritize matters effectively.

“We had a clear goal in front of us—to launch the product within 12 months,” he said, adding that this focus was a “driving engine” for the partnership’s first year.

Asked if any executives served on both the JLT and JDC committees, Shigeta estimated a 20 to 30 percent overlap, which helped bridge the cross-functional JLT teams and the JDC when the latter had to make recommendations to the JEC. Bell added that it was important for the people serving on both committees to have a certain amount of authority if the lower committees were to obtain alignment under the JEC.

Another viewer asked if this approach is translatable to a biotech-pharma alliance of two large organizations.

Bell felt it could be, provided that the organizations, particularly the big pharma company, weren’t entrenched in their way of doing things. A 50-50 alliance suggests no hierarchy and calls for each player to remain flexible. Shigeta noted that resource allocations may not be 50-50 in another collaboration, but that doesn’t have to derail a collaborative spirit. The companies just have to tailor a structure to their needs if the AstraZeneca–Daiichi Sankyo model doesn’t fit.

We captured all of the other live sessions from last week’s events on this blog, and we will be bringing recaps of several more prerecorded on-demand presentations over the course of the next month. However, if you registered for the BioPharma Conference, we strongly urge you to check out the full recordings on the conference portal. Our blog posts capture only a fraction of the great insights in each session, so don’t miss out on any of the great wisdom that has been shared during the livestream and on-demand portions of the event.

Tags:  Alliance  AstraZeneca  cancers  collaboration  Daiichi Sankyo  Enhertu  integration management  JDC  JLT  Jonathan Bell  Kenji Shigeta  Oncology Alliance  partnership  pharma-industry 

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Cross-Industry Panel Imparts Insights for Executing David-Goliath Partnerships

Posted By Jon Lavietes, Thursday, June 25, 2020

Big company–small company alliances are a fact of life in some industries. You see them in tech when Global 1,000 technology vendors integrate innovative functionality from smaller startups that fill gaps in their offerings, or when Big Pharma organizations team up with biotechs to develop promising compounds into marketable drugs. Also known as “David-Goliath” alliances, these relationships can contain many hidden land mines if people aren’t careful. Just ask ASAP president and CEO Michael Leonetti, who has led alliance groups in Big Pharma organizations in his career.

“Quite honestly, I’ve seen [this dynamic] kill many an alliance in my time,” said Leonetti in the lead-up to a panel session titled “Managing Power Imbalances: How to Navigate Partnerships Between Large and Small Organizations,” one of the highlights of the second day of this year’s ASAP Global Alliance Summit. 

Moderated by Jessica Wadd, partner at Vantage Partners, this well-rounded panel of seasoned alliance professionals from multiple industries brought a wealth of past and present perspectives from both ends of these types of collaborations:

  • Steve Pessagno, Alliance director and head of global alliance management operations, at GSK
  • Amy Walraven, founder, president, and chief strategy officer at Turnkey Risk Solutions
  • Joy Wilder Lybeer, senior vice president of enterprise alliances at Equifax
  • Troy M. Windt, associate vice president of global alliances and external relations at Reata Pharmaceuticals

“Cultural Diagnosis” Reveals What Might Ail a Collaboration of Big and Small

In kicking off the discussion with an overview of each panelist’s alliance portfolio, Lybeer noted that Equifax relies on smaller outfits to supplement its offerings in ways the company can’t do on its own, She added that the exercise of evaluating a variety of big and small partners “allows us to develop our understanding of potential coopetition, areas where we can supplement our capabilities, or find new routes to market.”

Walraven agreed with Lybeer that smaller companies have plenty of opportunities to complement larger organizations’ offerings with niche “cohesive enhancements.” 

Pessagno, who works with a number of GSK’s R&D-centric alliances with small entities, extolled the virtues of conducting a “cultural diagnosis” at the outset of the relationship to determine how the organizations are and aren’t aligned. This process usually unearths what truly matters to the collaboration as a whole, and these priorities that emerge are eventually woven into the governance and operational elements of the partnership, including the periodic health checks.

Asked what her organization looks for in a larger partner, Walraven cited domain expertise, a strong reputation, and a shared vision of where the fraud, risk, and credit markets, areas in which Humaitrix competes, are heading.

When do you know when you as a smaller organization might have trouble coping with the power imbalance? Windt said to pay attention to the latter’s adaptability right from the start. Since a large firm has lots of processes, can it tailor an alliance structure to fit a partner that might only have two points of contact? He recounted instances where an alternative structure was inserted into the contractual language only to see the large company “migrate back to one way of doing things.”    

Dealing with Outsized Expectations

At one point, Wadd wondered if the panelists ever got excited about a David-Goliath partnership, only to be disappointed when it didn’t fulfill its promise. The panel had no shortage of stories. Walraven spoke of a past partner that showed tremendous enthusiasm about her organization when it was brought in at a late stage of negotiation, but ultimately revealed itself to have little grasp of her company’s value proposition and business model as the collaboration unfolded. The parties tried retooling their joint client deliverables multiple times only to pull the plug on the project after a succession of misfires.

“You really want to make sure that you align ahead of time and that everyone has the same understanding before you set expectations about deliverables with the client,” she said.

Lybeer counseled viewers to identify “pink flags” quickly and abandon an initiative early if the team’s gut feeling is that it will never get onto the right course. She did, however, remind viewers that “the first idea is rarely ever the best idea,” and that oftentimes you don’t necessarily have to walk away from the partner altogether after one failed joint venture.

“As long as we are able and willing to learn and work together, we will find that next innovative idea together,” she said.

Plodding Behemoths Test Nimbler Smaller Companies’ Patience

What should small companies understand about their larger counterparts when evaluating a potential collaboration? Pessagno warned startup and SME alliance professionals that there is a good possibility some of the people in the negotiation stage will disappear after the launch of the partnership. He urged larger corporations to “deal with this transparently” and make some effort to guard against an “asymmetry in the governance.”

Even after some of the initial negotiators drift away, Pessagno acknowledged later in the panel discussion that the larger company’s team might still be four times the size of the smaller counterpart’s, and that the latter will have to endure cumbersome governance and operational processes at times. He recommended that the “Goliath” in the relationship assign a single contact person to the small company’s alliance manager and let the former liaison with the rest of the team and manage the bureaucracy.

In addition, Pessagno implored smaller collaborators to dispel the idea that their larger counterparts have tons of resources to dedicate to their activities. All alliances are competing for a finite amount of resources, even in big companies.

Tech Teams Need Alliance Management Principles

Walraven and Lybeer were asked specifically about analytics-based David-Goliath alliances. The big takeaway: remember that technology partnerships entail more than just technology. Lybeer once handed a technology alliance to the tech team and said, “Good luck to you.”   

“Mistake, mistake, mistake,” she lamented. “Alliance management competencies are a thing.”

The tech team didn’t understand escalation processes and collaboration models, which ended up delaying the activities of the partnership considerably.

Walraven exhorted alliance teams to look at everything through the technical, strategic, solution, and practitioner lenses. Also, take into account that each client and prospect will similarly imagine a joint solution differently.

“Everybody will see it through a different perspective,” she said.  

Alliance Skills Will Help Small-Company Personnel for Life

As the panel concluded, the panelists offered some final takeaways. Walraven reiterated that rigorous work aligning stakeholders on execution strategy up front would ultimately make it “easier to deliver to the client.”

Lybeer urged virtual attendees to strike that balance of being tough without compromising a collaborative mindset.  

“Let’s make sure we’re hard on the hard issues, but not so hard on each other,” she advised.

She echoed her earlier sentiments that you can always walk away from a project that isn’t meeting KPIs without abandoning the partnership entirely.

Most important, according to Windt, work with your HR department to teach collaborative skills and alliance management principles to everyone working on the partnership who may not have an alliance management background. In fact, lobby to make it a permanent part of employee training programs, wherever possible.

“They will serve you well as a person and an employee for the rest of your life,” he said.

Remember, Summit registrants can find this panel, a plethora of sessions from the first two days of the conference, and several prerecorded presentations on demand in the 2020 ASAP Global Alliance Summit portal.  

Tags:  Alliance  alliance management  alliance professionals  alliance skills  Amy Walraven  collaborations  Cultural Diagnosis  enterprise  GSK  Jessica Wadd  Joy Wilder Lybeer  operations  partnership  Reata Pharmaceuticals  skills  Steve Pessagno  Troy M. Windt  Turnkey Risk Solutions  Vantage Partners 

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Riding the Roller Coaster in a Long-standing Alliance

Posted By Michael J. Burke, Thursday, June 25, 2020

How do you keep a long-standing alliance moving forward productively? Put another way, how do you keep a roller coaster humming along on its tracks, despite the ups and downs?

The answer, in a nutshell, is to have tools, frameworks, and lots of communication. And for good measure, a dedicated team whose sole purpose is to look after the health and success of the partnership. In a word, resilience.

That was the message of Alistair Dixon, PhD, head of alliance and integration management at UCB, and Tracy Blois, PhD, director, alliance management business development at Amgen. Their presentation, “Resilience in Alliance Management: How Amgen-UCB Managed the ‘Roller-Coaster Ride’ of a Long-standing Alliance,” was just one of many sessions now available on demand from the virtual ASAP Global Alliance Summit.

From Molecule to Market

This alliance began back in 2002, as a partnership between Amgen and Celltech. In 2004 Celltech was acquired by UCB, and the partnership continued as a collaboration license agreement for research, development, and eventual marketing of antibody products targeting the protein sclerostin, which plays a role in bone formation. As Blois described it, this was conceived as a partnership “from molecule to market from very early on.”

Profits and losses would be shared equally, and as Dixon said, “This collaboration agreement is truly structured to foster collaboration, alignment, and concession.”

Perhaps surprisingly, given that UCB is European, headquartered in Brussels—Dixon is based in the UK—and Amgen is a US company based in Thousand Oaks, Calif., Dixon reported that the cultural differences between the two companies were not actually that great. Organizational and internal structures, however, were another matter.

UCB is organized around “patient value units” and “product missions,” and regional leads report back to business units. Amgen, on the other hand, is more traditionally organized into R&D, operations, and commercial, and the regions report back to the commercial division.

Exploring Differences, and Cooling Off the “White Heat”

It was important first that these organizational differences be understood and communicated, and that some tools and strategies be developed for the sake of the alliance. These have consisted of three main pillars:

  • Regular health checks, including the use of joint organizational maps
  • Alliance tools, including focusing on interests, not positions
  • Evolved governance, featuring the formation of an alliance leadership team, or ALT

The tools in particular were helpful, including a Circle of Value tool provided by Vantage Partners, as well as joint problem-solving frameworks, “ways of working” frameworks, and exercises in joint scenario planning. The latter, according to Dixon, helped the two companies to “prealign” before finding themselves in “the white heat of a difficult situation.”

Reaping the Benefits of an Elevated, ALTernative Governance

Having a flexible governance model helped as well, but one of the biggest contributors to the alliance’s success has been the formation of an Alliance Leadership Team (ALT), specifically focused on the needs of the partnership and its ongoing health. The ALT membership is composed of senior program leadership, along with representatives from global alliance management, global project management, and finance—all from both organizations, working together.

According to both Dixon and Blois, the ALT has been able to resolve issues, avoid escalations, establish more trust, and more proactively manage the partnership overall—which has made for better cross-functional execution by the joint project team, as well as more “elevated” governance by the joint commercial committee and other governance bodies.

Dixon and Blois both see the ALT as a team specifically set up to focus on the success of the partnership. The key role it plays has meant that:

  • Time and space have been carved out for “nonoperational” decisions.
  • The ALT fosters objective, nonpositional discussions and is a “safe space” for open conversation about perceptions and concerns.
  • Senior governance has become more strategic, with the ALT getting “ahead” of the usual governance committees in its high-level decision making.
  • Trust has been built over time through issue resolution and intervention.

Meanwhile, the years of research and development and hard work by all concerned resulted in a new drug called Evenity (romosozumab), approved for treatment of osteoporosis among postmenopausal women at high risk of bone fracture. So the partnership not only has kept the roller coaster on the tracks, but arguably has been an exhilarating success.

“Resilience has been absolutely key to this,” said Dixon. “Being able to sit down, understand, and have open and transparent conversations with people has been critical to what we’ve achieved.”

Tags:  Alistair Dixon  alliance management  alternative governance  Amgen  collaboration  cross-functional execution governance  health checks  integration  joint organizational map  partnership  PhD  Tracy Blois  UCB 

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“A Commonality of Spirit”: How a Cancer Center Partners to Help More Patients

Posted By Michael J. Burke, Monday, June 8, 2020

At ASAP we’re used to talking about all kinds of partnerships: tech industry, cross-industry, biopharma, multipartner ecosystems, and others of many flavors. But what kinds of partnerships are important to a hospital—specifically, a leading cancer center?

That will be the subject of a June 23 keynote presentation at ASAP’s virtual Global Alliance Summit, “A Cancer Center’s Experience Developing Clinical Partnerships and Alliances: Opportunities and Cautions,” to be given by Dr. Louis B. Harrison, MD, FASTRO, vice president, chief partnership officer, and chair of the radiation oncology department at the Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, Fla.

“Everyone Wins”

 Speaking with me recently via Zoom—a conversation briefly interrupted because he had to go check on a patient—Dr. Harrison indicated that the partnerships the Moffitt Cancer Center is engaged in, and that he’ll be speaking about later this month, tend to fall into two categories: clinical care and clinical research. As an example of the former, he mentioned a partnership that Moffitt runs to deliver radiation oncology services at one or more hospitals within a 20-hospital system.

“They did not have radiation oncology expertise, although they did have other key elements to their cancer program, so we develop a partnership with them, and in the context of that partnership, we send faculty there, and treat patients there, and work with them to build a program, and do that together with that hospital,” he explained. “Another partnership relates to bone marrow transplants—that partner did not have a successful transplant program, so we sent a key clinical leader there, added additional faculty, and incorporated key members of their existing faculty, who all collaborate with the faculty at our main center in Tampa. But the key is that we treat patients there. Everyone wins—especially the patients, who are now able to receive state-of-the-art care closer to home.”

Some partnerships involve both treatment of patients and running clinical trials, he said. “Another partnership I’ll talk about [at the Summit] is a large health system where we’re going to open up a clinical trial unit and develop an outpatient cancer center, and do any number of other things in the clinical and research realm—things that they could have done by themselves, but which they felt would be stronger by doing it with us. The synergies here are basically that these hospitals or health systems have special needs in cancer—and those needs are better fulfilled when they partner with a place like Moffitt. At the same time, Moffitt gets to extend our footprint into these other hospitals and health systems. So we grow together: they get services and expertise that they don’t have but they need, and patients in those communities benefit because they get the Moffitt level of care without traveling to Tampa. Everybody wins.”

Definitely a win-win—for the smaller community hospitals that don’t have the types of specialists a major-league cancer center features, but also for Moffitt itself, Dr. Harrison said.

“Not only don’t they have [those services and expertise], but it would be hard for them to develop expertise at that level,” he explained. “A community hospital is just not going to develop that breadth and depth—it would not be worth their while, just in the context of their entire mission. They can’t possibly go that deep into the basic science and biology of cancer, at a molecular level—they don’t see enough cancer patients, and they don’t have the infrastructure to do the kinds of things that an NCI Designated Comprehensive Cancer Center can do. At the same time, there’s no way for us to have our own network of hospitals in Florida. But if our partners have the system of hospitals and we have depth of expertise, that makes for a perfect  combination. [They get] specialists, and access to clinical trials, special drugs, new therapeutics, molecular diagnostics, expert pathology, things like that.”

In addition to its mission of treating cancer patients, Moffitt is also involved in various clinical trials at a number of levels, and some of these necessitate partnerships as well. “Sometimes we develop trials that are our own trials, and sometimes we join cooperative group trials, and sometimes we join pharmaceutical trials, so it’s all of the above,” Dr. Harrison explained. “The more patients we can enroll on trials, the more we can learn and the more progress we can make in helping patients.”

Two Day Jobs at Once

He further noted that his role as chief partnership officer is actually in addition to his “day job,” which is heading up the Moffitt’s department of radiation oncology. “I’m the chair of radiation oncology, I’m a doctor, so this partnership role is not my main job, but it’s part of my job,” he said. “But we’ve developed a fairly robust team, so I have a leadership role on the clinical side, I have a partner, another person, a vice president who is the business lead, and [we] work closely together. Then we have a series of financial analysts and managers and partnership administrators and physicians who take the lead for various projects. We liaise with scientists at some of our partnership hospitals. So if you think about it, there’s a fairly broad and wide infrastructure that supports this, and it all does report up through our senior partnership leadership team.”

As to any challenges or obstacles that arise in these ongoing partnerships, Dr. Harrison pointed out the importance of the cultural and strategic fit between partnership institutions. These relationships make all the difference, he said—and as ASAP members know, they need to be handled with care.

“[In] partnerships and alliances, there has to be a commonality of culture, a commonality of spirit,” he said. “These relationships often, maybe more often than not, boil down to the people who are involved and their ability to work together. On the one hand [they] represent their institutions well, and on the other hand [they] find the commonality and the overlap where there can be synergy, where there can be common success. Taking the time and having the patience to truly understand one another’s goals is a crucial factor in the success of any partnership.”

Finding Opportunity in a Time of Greater Need

Asked about the effects of the COVID-19 crisis, Dr. Harrison acknowledged that there is “absolutely” more need for such partnerships now, given the ways in which the pandemic has upended nearly every aspect of our lives, including healthcare.

“Yes, of course, it changes everything,” he said. “Like many other things, it’s ‘What’s your framework?’ I think it’s an opportunity. Because at the end of the day, COVID-19 has stressed every healthcare system, every business, every enterprise in the country. With that stress, it becomes harder to do things yourself, and more palatable oftentimes to do things with others. Not only to share resources, but also to share risks. I think a common threat, like any other circumstance, should allow good partnerships to thrive and find new ways to work together that will make the threat we all face more surmountable on the one hand, and then of course on the other hand to be able to do things with shared resources that either of the partners would be challenged to do on their own, especially in this resource-challenged environment. So we have approached COVID-19 as an opportunity—as a partnership opportunity.”

For more information on the virtual ASAP Global Alliance Summit and to register, go to https://www.asapsummit.org/

Tags:  Alliances  cancer program  clinical care  Clinical Partnerships  clinical research  COVID-19  culture  Dr. Louis B. Harrison  hospitals  Moffitt Cancer Center  partner  partnership  radiation oncology 

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The Association of Strategic Alliance Professionals (ASAP) and allianceboard partner to elevate alliance management through technology

Posted By Kimberly Miller, Wednesday, February 12, 2020

Alliance technology has become an imperative for alliance professionals – ASAP and allianceboard are teaming-up to combine resources, best practices, and technology to support ever-evolving collaboration models.

This month, ASAP and allianceboard announced a technology and knowledge partnership that will combine ASAP resources and best practices with allianceboard’s purpose-built alliance management software solution.

The partnership between ASAP and allianceboard will create value in:

  • Offering special subscription packages for ASAP biopharma member organizations
  • Providing ASAP membership benefits to allianceboard clients
  • Integrating ASAP resources and best practices into the allianceboard platform
  • Jointly developing resources for the benefit of the alliance management community

“Our partnership with allianceboard supports ASAP’s mission to elevate the alliance management profession and to amplify its impact.  This enables ASAP to extend our resources through the allianceboard digital platform to our biopharma members and to provide these benefits to an even broader audience. allianceboard was designed from the ground-up around the needs of alliance management so this is a natural fit for our biopharma members,” said Mike Leonetti, President and CEO of ASAP.

“ASAP’s thought leadership in alliance management combined with their extensive resources have had a tremendous impact on the evolution of alliance management over the past two decades. Our clients globally recognize how much our solution, built around best practices, has become a game changer for them. We are excited to join forces with ASAP in our common mission to support organizations in achieving their growth and innovation goals through strategic alliances,” said Louis Rinfret, founder and CEO of allianceboard.

Benefits for ASAP members and allianceboard clients https://www.allianceboard.com/asap-allianceboard-partnership

ASAP membership overview

https://www.strategic-alliances.org/page/membership

allianceboard overview

https://www.allianceboard.com

About ASAP

The Association of Strategic Alliance Professionals (ASAP) is the leading global professional association dedicated to the formation, implementation, and transformation of alliances, collaborations and business partnerships. ASAP provides its members forums for networking and professional development along with access to tools and resources, while working to elevate and promote the discipline of alliance management. Founded in 1998, ASAP is a non-profit global professional membership organization with over 2,250 members representing over 35 countries across the globe. Membership represents a cross-sector of industries including high tech, biopharma, finance, insurance, and retail to name a few.

About allianceboard

allianceboard is a purpose-built, easy-to-use alliance management platform for alliance professionals. allianceboard has been developed to give alliance managers a state-of-the-art tool that’s simple and scalable – to stay on top of it all, show organizational impact and easily collaborate with partners for innovation and growth.

Tags:  alliance  alliance managers  Allianceboard  best practices  management platform  partnership  resources  tools 

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