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Huawei’s Strategy for Partnering Success (Part Two): Focusing on Customer Challenges that ‘Only Innovative Partnering Solutions Can Solve’

Posted By Genevieve Fraser, Tuesday, March 6, 2018
Updated: Saturday, March 3, 2018

This is the second of a two-part blog post based on my recent interview with Greg Fox, CSAP, a longtime ASAP member who is currently vice president of strategic alliances at Huawei Technologies, headquartered in Shenzhen, Guangdong, China. For the past two years, Fox has lead Huawei’s efforts to build information and communications technologies (ICT) industry-leading alliance management competencies and global partnering capabilities.

 

Organizations that Huawei is most apt to forge alliances with are heavily driven and influenced by the needs of their business groups and associated business units, where Huawei products and solutions are incubated, produced, and delivered to the market.

 

According to Fox, during the early phases, he and his team were focused on traditional alliances in the IT space, including independent software vendors (ISVs), systems integrators (SIs), and key technology partners. As the business evolved and expanded beyond this core, it brought in a new era of partnering with non-traditional partners focused on specific industries.

 

“For example, we partner with GE Digital to push the industrial industry towards digitization and automation, with KUKA for smart factories to enable acceptance of the smart production applications in the manufacturing sector, and with the likes of Honeywell to bring to market smart building offerings that take advantage of the latest IoT [Internet of Things] technologies to help make buildings more sustainable, secure and energy efficient,” he said. “In our digital transformation platform effort, we are open to any mutually advantageous partnering arrangement, where we together can combine our capabilities and value to deliver customer success.”

 

Fox explained that some partners are global and cross-industry in nature, while others focus on specific industry business needs, where a relationship may just be tied to that industry. “We are finding that in this age of digital transformation and the desire for increased innovation, productivity, and growth, there are not absolute boundaries that exist. What we do today with a partner in one industry, as the business grows, and we prove things and show success, this may also lead to expanding that partnership to include another industry, and it can scale in breadth and scope, but also in depth.”

 

The most attractive areas of cooperation for Huawei today, and for the foreseeable future, are areas in which customers are experiencing their biggest business challenges that only innovative partnering solutions can solve. One of the central business challenges they face is how to foster innovation and achieve growth, and many are placing digital transformation at the center of their strategies through 2020. Yet, according to Forrester research, only 27% of businesses have a coherent digital transformation strategy in place for creating customer value. This is a major concern, and there is fear of becoming obsolete if this gap is not addressed.

 

Huawei’s goal is to be the digital transformation platform that connects intelligence, data, and devices, and that enables its customers to increase engagement with partners and develop applications that foster innovation. “The beauty of digital transformation is that its customer-centric marketing and business processes require the ability to work across business verticals and silos, which requires partners and ecosystems to achieve,” Fox said.

 

To learn more about Huawei’s partnering efforts, read part one of this blog as well as Genevieve Fraser’s Member Spotlight in the Q4 2017 issue of Strategic Alliance Magazine. Greg Fox also co-presented, with Andrew Yeomans, CSAP, of Merck Serono, the January 18, 2018 ASAP Netcast webinar “Building the Engines of Collaboration Inside and Beyond the Borders of Mainland China.”

Tags:  alliance management  cloud  digital transformation  GE Digital  global partnering capabilities  governance structures  Greg Fox  Honeywell  Huawei Technologies  ICT  independent software vendors (ISVs)  manage alliance relationship  partnerships  strategic alliances  systems integrators (SIs)  technology partners 

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Managing Complex Software Engineering Alliances in a World Teeming With Digital Twins

Posted By Cynthia B. Hanson, Thursday, May 5, 2016
Updated: Wednesday, May 4, 2016

Michael Moser spends a good deal of his day collaborating in a digital world. With tech experience that reaches back 25 years with some of the biggest companies in the industry, such as HP, he is well-positioned to manage very complex software engineering alliances. When he came onboard at Dassault Systémes in Vélizy-Villacoublay, France, 15 years ago, he had already been introduced to interactive 3-D software, such as the engineering model for the Boeing 777. Since then, 3-D software has evolved significantly; it’s now a realistic, animated prototype capable of interconnecting via the cloud, he explained to me in an interview during the 2016 ASAP Global Alliance Summit “Partnering Everywhere: Expert Leadership for the Ecosystem,” held at the Gaylord National Resort & Convention Center, National Harbor, Maryland. For Moser, who offered the session “Master a Portfolio of Tactics to Animate the Partner Ecosystem,” the challenge of the day is deciding how to build partner networks that capture mushrooming opportunities in a growing industry. 

What are digital twins, and how do customers use them?
Dassault Systémes creates 3-D experiences for customers to sell a product. The customers can then present it digitally through simulation, which allows users to demonstrate and experience the product before a physical product is built. It’s called a digital twin, because you have a twin of your real-world product in the digital world. Dassault works with many industries, such as transportation, shipbuilding, aerospace and defense, high-tech products, architecture and engineering, consumer package goods (supermarkets), life sciences (the human body), energy creation and consumption, natural resources (mining), and security (panic patterns and fires).  The program can create digital twins for nature and the planet, such as altering a riverbed to impact a valley. It can simulate molecules and life and test chemical reactions. It’s all physics in the end. 

What types of projects have used a digital twin?
Electronics, data management, online connections, Internet of Things technology, sensors. It’s used by healthcare a lot, not only for analysis but also for emergency support, and security for simulating a terrorist attack or nuclear accident. If you apply this concept to a city, for example Singapore, which is one of our customers, it can be used to investigate the impact of changes on new buildings and physical parameters, such as lights, wind, and pollution. A client asked Dassault to simulate towing an iceberg from Antarctica to Africa for fresh water. It worked, so now they know it can be done. We also can build thermoanalytic systems for rising temperatures resulting from global warming that consist of human models walking through a city and experiencing temperature variation. 

What are the benefits of building digital twins?
It saves money for the customer as compared to the old model of build a prototype, such as a town in the desert. With a digital twin, you don’t have the expense of building or destroying a physical structure. It’s also much more green and sustainable because you don’t have to building physical structures. With a simulated car crash, you might need 10 prototypes for a crash. With a twin, you only have to build one to certify safety. Another benefit is flexibility: They can be altered to optimize the design. It also saves time. For example, instead of asking customers to walk aisles and document their findings on questionnaires, you can have customers wear goggles, send them through a store, and change the aisles based on capturing their reaction. With goggles, you are really in the midst of the digital twin because it scans the body, and you can actually see your hands. You look down at your feet, and your feet are in the virtual world. You also get better feedback because you can test multiple scenarios to optimize design and collect feedback to incorporate it. 

How do you try to capture this growing, and sometimes illusive, market?
Not only does Dassault simulate and construct prototypes, we are engaged in solution partnerships. There are an enormous number of technology partners with programs integrated into software. They develop solutions and want to sell them, but they aren’t always properly promoted. They need to sell to a broader ecosystem of customers and users. I take those partners’ positions and interests and design a support structure to sell and promote their solutions. One technique I use is a social marketing platform called “Talk,” an online community where partners can explain their solution to potential users. We integrate them to go to market, develop sales leads, and provide a platform to communicate akin to LinkedIn that is comprised of a Dassault customer base. 

What do you foresee for Dassault’s future?
The challenge is to bring it to next level and give more freedom to this ecosystem. If you have a bulletproof Pentagon style, you won’t meet the requirements of the new world, which is integrated instantly with apps. I am in favor of loose controls because if you don’t work that way these days, you will lose opportunity. These skills are more needed than deep technology skills, at least in the partnering environment—you need collaboration skills and open mindedness. 

Tags:  collaboration  Dassault Systémes  digital twin  ecosystem  go to market  Mike Moser  partnerships  technology partners  thermoanalytic systems 

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